Author Topic: US-05 at low temp  (Read 16212 times)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #45 on: October 02, 2015, 05:52:42 PM »
that's unfortunate.  I use it often and people seem to really like my beer.

I do not care what anyone says, beer made with US-05 has an edge to it that is not present in beers that are made Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001, or "Chico" cultured from the bottle (one is not going to detect this edge if one is making beers with the equivalent of 6 ounces of hops or more per 5-gallons of wort anymore than one will pick up slightly tainted meat used in a highly-spiced dish).  I believe that this edge, along with the tendency to produce the peach ester are the result of aerobic propagation in a bioreactor.  It's the same reason why S-04 has a few strange tendencies compared to Wyeast 1098 and White Labs WLP007.  S-04 is Whitbread "B," but something happens during aerobic propagation that alters it behavior slightly.

I agree, Mark. I've used lots of 05 in past years (mostly for spur of the moment brewing), and in a hop forward beer the differences aren't very noticeable. But I've also used it in styles like blonde and cream ale where the peach 'edge' you mention is definitely there. I generally just prefer liquid cultures in a starter. Personal preference.
Jon H.

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #46 on: October 02, 2015, 05:56:47 PM »
I do not care what anyone says, beer made with US-05 has an edge to it that is not present in beers that are made Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001, or "Chico" cultured from the bottle (one is not going to detect this edge if one is making beers with the equivalent of 6 ounces of hops or more per 5-gallons of wort anymore than one will pick up slightly tainted meat used in a highly-spiced dish).  I believe that this edge, along with the tendency to produce the peach ester are the result of aerobic propagation in a bioreactor.  It's the same reason why S-04 has a few strange tendencies compared to Wyeast 1098 and White Labs WLP007.  S-04 is Whitbread "B," but something happens during aerobic propagation that alters it behavior slightly.

I've used it recently in an oatmeal stout (not highly hopped at all) and a strong ale (only moderately hopped) and I don't really detect anything I would describe as off.  Perhaps if I was making blonde ale (which I pretty much never would) it would be there.  Most of my ales are either hoppy or dark or both.

There was a time when I didn't like it but now I do.  Perhaps something has changed about their process.  Fortunately I don't really need to convince your taste buds since you aren't drinking it.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #47 on: October 02, 2015, 05:58:45 PM »
I will say I think 05 works perfectly well in a hoppy, dark, or otherwise fairly strong flavored beer. I just didn't like it in pale, mild ones.
Jon H.

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #48 on: October 02, 2015, 06:10:42 PM »
I will say I think 05 works perfectly well in a hoppy, dark, or otherwise fairly strong flavored beer. I just didn't like it in pale, mild ones.

thinking back to the last time where I wasn't exactly happy with the results from US-05 I think temp control is important.  on that batch I didn't control the temperature like I have been more recently.  It could be that my current profile minimizes what some see as undesirable traits.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #49 on: October 02, 2015, 06:18:02 PM »
Just because others don't like doesn't mean you're wrong for liking it.  But it's also possible that what Mark describes as "off" about US-05 is a flavor that you've come to expect from it.

One way to test this would be to split a batch and try US-05 in one fermenter and 1056 in another.

Personally, I don't care for Nottingham yeast.  I used to use it quite a bit and wasn't happy with a number of my batches.  Figuring it could be the yeast, I did a split batch with different English yeasts and came to the conclusion that there are better options for me than Nottingham.

Of course, I've got a batch going right now with US-05 and another batch going with S-04 (working through my dry yeast stash).  I've never used S-04 so hopefully any strange tendencies it may have are not evident.  And I'll have to look for a peach flavor in my pale ale.
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evil_morty

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #50 on: October 02, 2015, 06:21:41 PM »
Just because others don't like doesn't mean you're wrong for liking it.  But it's also possible that what Mark describes as "off" about US-05 is a flavor that you've come to expect from it.

One way to test this would be to split a batch and try US-05 in one fermenter and 1056 in another.

I agree.  I also don't really treat it as an equivalent to 1056.  similar but not the same.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #51 on: October 02, 2015, 08:30:31 PM »
I like US-05 in a number of beers. I've used it to finish a Berliner Weisse, cold ferment a Munich Helles wort, and of course for hoppy PAs and IPAs. I think it is an incredibly versatile yeast.

However, I do agree with Mark that there can be 'something' in some strains that you may not like. I'm not a big fan of S-04 and for some reason, I very much dislike the flavor of WY 1007 beers. Its just me. So I can't fault Mark for his dislikes either.
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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #52 on: October 02, 2015, 08:38:08 PM »
I like US-05 in a number of beers. I've used it to finish a Berliner Weisse, cold ferment a Munich Helles wort, and of course for hoppy PAs and IPAs. I think it is an incredibly versatile yeast.

However, I do agree with Mark that there can be 'something' in some strains that you may not like. I'm not a big fan of S-04 and for some reason, I very much dislike the flavor of WY 1007 beers. Its just me. So I can't fault Mark for his dislikes either.

I really want to like S-04 but I can't quite do it.  it's right on the edge.

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #53 on: October 02, 2015, 08:58:01 PM »
I agree.  I also don't really treat it as an equivalent to 1056.  similar but not the same.

While they are more than likely different isolates, US-05 and Wyeast 1056 are the same yeast strain.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #54 on: October 02, 2015, 09:10:56 PM »
I very much dislike the flavor of WY 1007 beers.

Wyeast 1007 is a strange beast. 

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #55 on: October 02, 2015, 09:26:44 PM »
I agree.  I also don't really treat it as an equivalent to 1056.  similar but not the same.

While they are more than likely different isolates, US-05 and Wyeast 1056 are the same yeast strain.

that's what I hear but I have found the end results to be different.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: US-05 at low temp
« Reply #56 on: October 02, 2015, 10:09:20 PM »
that's what I hear but I have found the end results to be different.

The difference has to do with how US-05 is propagated.   In a nutshell, US-05 never experiences ethanol until it is pitched into a batch of beer because it propagated aerobically below the Crabtree threshold in a bioreactor using a continuously fed process.  Liquid cultures are propagated above the Crabtree threshold in batches.  If you want to know the gory details, search on my username and "Crabtree."   I have explained the dry yeast propagation process many times.  It is radically different that the liquid yeast propagation process.