Author Topic: Why Plato?  (Read 7306 times)

Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2013, 05:58:09 PM »
Technically, I think that's because a refractometer can't directly read SG. And the problem is the relationship between SG and Plato are not perfectly linear. For the same reason, a hydrometer can't directly read Plato.

So when a brewery gives starting and finishing plato, which instrument gives them that? Refractometers give degrees Brix and hydrometers give specific gravity. What gives plato?

Brix = Plato
Acutely that s not correct.
There is 1.04 correction factor.
I think it has to do with what kind of sugar it is.

I use hydrometer with Plato scale and thermometer with adjustment factor.
I have one for low range (0-9) and one for mid range (8-16)
I should also buy the high range but I do not brew too many beers over 16 Plato.
I like this hydrometer better then refractometer.
I think it is more accurate.
I measure only Last runnings and wort after cooling.
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2013, 08:03:46 PM »
Brix = Plato
Acutely that s not correct.

They're different, but the difference is so small it doesn't matter at all in brewing. 1.040 SG is 9.99325 °Bx or 9.99359 °P.

I think Plato is more intuitive. It scales linearly, and one "unit" is a significant variation for brewing purposes. It's also shorter/easier to read and write, which reduces the likelihood of mistakes.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2013, 10:42:42 AM »
My understanding -- and this is probably some or all incorrect -- is that plato is used a lot in the professional brewing literature from continental Europe while gravity was more of an English preference. When brewers in the US learned to brew it was from continental literature but homebrewers adopted texts from English brewers which carried gravity forward into American homebrewing. I don't know where I picked up that story but it seems to have some potential truth to it.
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Offline ccfoo242

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2013, 01:57:44 PM »
So what's used to measure the finishing Plato? I know they can use a refractometer only if they use a formula like Sean's. Sorry to seem dense. If they use a hydrometer then wouldn't that require them to convert to Plato?

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Offline denny

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #19 on: July 06, 2013, 02:35:00 PM »
So what's used to measure the finishing Plato? I know they can use a refractometer only if they use a formula like Sean's. Sorry to seem dense. If they use a hydrometer then wouldn't that require them to convert to Plato?

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My hydrometer reads in Brix, Plato, and SG.
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Offline Kaiser

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2013, 02:40:07 PM »
I believe it's because Plato is more precise than sg when it comes to attenuation calculations, for example. Also, most of the brewing calculations are based on Plato or a similar measure of wort solids.

Sg works well enough and was picked up by home brewers. Sg based brewing calculations also originate in UK brewing if I'm not mistaken.

When I toured AB a while back I noticed extract displays in Balling.

Kai


Offline denny

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2013, 03:42:47 PM »
I believe it's because Plato is more precise than sg when it comes to attenuation calculations, for example. Also, most of the brewing calculations are based on Plato or a similar measure of wort solids.

Sg works well enough and was picked up by home brewers. Sg based brewing calculations also originate in UK brewing if I'm not mistaken.

When I toured AB a while back I noticed extract displays in Balling.

Kai

Good to see you posting again, Kai.
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Offline Kaiser

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2013, 05:52:07 PM »

Good to see you posting again, Kai.

Let's see how much time I can find for the forums.

Kai


Offline denny

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2013, 06:06:57 PM »

Good to see you posting again, Kai.

Let's see how much time I can find for the forums.

Kai

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2013, 07:23:07 PM »

Good to see you posting again, Kai.

Let's see how much time I can find for the forums.

Kai

You have to make time Kai.

Happy to see you back. Your feedback is appreciated by many, including me.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2013, 05:58:40 AM »

Good to see you posting again, Kai.

Let's see how much time I can find for the forums.

Kai
I too appreciate your insights and research posts.

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Offline Kaiser

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #26 on: July 08, 2013, 07:46:20 PM »
Thanks.

I should be able to find some time. You can also email me if you feel you need my input on a topic.

The NHC had become big. I wonder how much larger it can get.

Kai

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2013, 02:25:00 AM »
Thanks.

I should be able to find some time. You can also email me if you feel you need my input on a topic.

The NHC had become big. I wonder how much larger it can get.

Kai
4000 next year is what they are working on.
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Offline drjones

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #28 on: July 09, 2013, 09:00:20 AM »
Quote
I says to myself - I'm sure there is a SG refractometer out there. Sure enough - dual scale ...
 
http://www.amazon.com/Beer-Wort-Wine-Refractometer-Scale/dp/B006GG0TDK
 
AND IT'S ON SALE FOR $15 (from $90). SCORE!!!

They are going for $23 now - still way less than I paid just a few months ago.  If you don't have a refractometer, there is no more excuse not to.  Maybe it's overkill, but I love taking regular readings off my sparge runoff, from the fermenter, etc. a drop at a time.  Besides, the geek factor will bring oohs and aahs from your brew day audience.  That alone is worth the $23!  White lab coat anyone?
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Offline denny

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Re: Why Plato?
« Reply #29 on: July 09, 2013, 09:59:51 AM »
Thanks.

I should be able to find some time. You can also email me if you feel you need my input on a topic.

The NHC had become big. I wonder how much larger it can get.

Kai
4000 next year is what they are working on.

Yeah, that's kinda scary....
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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