Author Topic: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees  (Read 6046 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2013, 03:37:52 PM »
Will be interesting to see how much beerocrocy there is. Law can say one thing then the agency overlords add to it

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2013, 05:56:52 PM »
Seems like they want you to have a farm to get the license. Probably trying to promote the local thing. I'd guess the people who issue the license would like to see a "farm" first.
There was a nano bill on the table here in Pa recently that would allow you to brew 1500 bbl a year for $500/ year. Haven't heard anything about it in awhile.

Offline mtnrockhopper

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2013, 07:21:41 PM »
If you're in a barley growing area (common in Delaware anyway) you might be able to rent the land to a grower with the contract stipulating that they'll provide you some of the barley or wheat grown. That might free you from the farming part while satisfying the law. You could keep a small plot to grow fruits/spices/other interesting stuff.  As you're probably figuring, much will depend on how the agency/inspectors interpret the law.
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Offline tonyp

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2013, 01:29:08 PM »
Well this is a bust. Just got off the phone with the NJ ABC and it seems the amended bill was never actually signed into law meaning the Farm Brewery License doesn't exist, but the Farm Winery License does. In any case, 3 or 3.5 acres of cultivated land is required for the Farm Winery so I'm guessing it would be similar for the brewery license if it did exist.

*pacman dying sound*

:(

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Offline euge

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2013, 01:37:03 PM »
How much does an acre of rural NJ cost?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tonyp

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2013, 01:41:35 PM »
How much is rural NJ per acre?

not really sure euge, I'm at the Jersey Shore in Toms River and we have approx. 3.8 acres total. We are zoned rural and the property was originally purchased in 1970 I think. This area used to be nothing but chicken/egg/dairy farms back in the day. The rural zoning here is becoming quite rare, and you'd have to travel about 30-40 miles west or south west to be in what's considered actual rural countryside.
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Offline tonyp

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2013, 01:44:43 PM »
For future reference, here is the link to the current NJ Liquor Statute as of 2013.

New Jersey Statutes - Title 33 Intoxicating Liquors - 33:1-10 Class A licenses; subdivisions; fees.

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Offline majorvices

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2013, 02:39:52 PM »
Why should farmers get more lenient "brewery" regulations that the rest of the people living in NJ?
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Offline tonyp

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #23 on: July 18, 2013, 02:54:38 PM »
Why should farmers get more lenient "brewery" regulations that the rest of the people living in NJ?

Because farm wineries get the privilege already?

Plus, with the way the bill was worded, you could only sell to consumers so you couldn't compete with plenary/restricted/limited breweries in regards to keg sales at bars. So it would be package sales for off-site only except for samples.
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Offline narvin

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2013, 08:04:08 PM »
The law in Maryland was introduced to promote the use of local ingredients and farming in general.  This used to be a big farm area before the suburban sprawl and Washington money, and anything that encourages the growth of industries that use Maryland agriculture is seen as a positive.  The current thinking is that local food is good for your health, your taste buds, and the environment.  You pay less for the license but otherwise will have to meet the same requirements as any other licensee.  An advantage here is that you can sell for on-premise consumption from 10am-6pm without a separate class D liquor license.  However, you can only serve your own beer and the restriction that you grow one of the main ingredients for the beer more than offsets the  benefits if you're just looking for a loophole / easy way to get into the business. 
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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2013, 02:21:39 AM »
I'm sure Big Beer's lobbies have everything to do with it. Another reason to never buy their products.

Offline VinS

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2013, 08:41:33 AM »
I would look at the Restricted brewery that you listed in that N.J link you posted. Not as great as a farm brewery but beats the others buy far. It allows you to sell on site and self distribute to resturants up to 15 gallons.
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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2013, 08:56:28 AM »
you still have to deal with the feds and pay a bond but that goes towards your taxes due them anyway.

The bond is held as collateral against the taxes on future production. You only get it back if you go out of business.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2013, 09:20:11 AM »
you still have to deal with the feds and pay a bond but that goes towards your taxes due them anyway.

The bond is held as collateral against the taxes on future production. You only get it back if you go out of business.

right. wasn't totally clear there. thanks
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Offline mtnrockhopper

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Re: Going Pro Cheap - NJ Farm Brewery Licensing and Fees
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2013, 11:51:17 AM »
Why should farmers get more lenient "brewery" regulations that the rest of the people living in NJ?
Lots of states help ag businesses out, though I think a state supporting farm breweries is sort of dumb given that you'd need to malt any grain you grow and few areas are great for hops. It doesn't seem really reasonable. And I'd rather see them just support small breweries.
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