Author Topic: Kitchen re-do  (Read 6024 times)

Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #60 on: August 13, 2013, 06:42:50 PM »
Photo of dimmer and Super Bright undercabinet on left and Ultra Bright Task Lighting on right:


Photo of undercabinet Super Bright led strip at full brightness:


The difference in the brightness is how many led are present per inch.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #61 on: August 16, 2013, 01:21:16 AM »
Woah, mdixon, THANK YOU for those links. You probably just saved me more than $200, and plus it looks like these are much better quality. Agreed on the dimmer, not sure that we'll fuss that much with it.
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Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #62 on: August 16, 2013, 05:20:13 AM »
Here is my layout, I changed the wiring around a little, but we went back and forth. The key is to get him the cabinet dimensions so he can get the correct length of LED for what you want and to allow for connectors. They can all daisy chain if the power suppy is big enough and if you do not care about them being switched separately.



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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #63 on: August 16, 2013, 05:48:12 AM »
So another thing about the tile, I've done some research and am considering doing something like this: http://www.ukflooringdirect.co.uk/Engineered/Engineered_Hand_Aged_Distressed_Coffee_Oak_189mm_Brushed_%2526_Lacqu.html

Apparently with a floating floor you can install it directly on top of the existing tile, as long as the appropriate vapor barrier is added first.

Plus in case of major water damage, the damaged planks could be ripped out and replaced fairly 'easily.'

What about electric subfloor heating? I asked the guy at ukflooringdirect about it, he said it's pretty easy to just add a layer between the substrate and the floating floor, it's sort of a looped resistance that you lay down like a carpet. Anybody have this?
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Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #64 on: August 16, 2013, 06:09:28 AM »
My father has electric mat in his bathrooms. I think he actually got it off ebay from someone in the UK. I noticed awhile back that Costco has it online (you can find the installation manual there):
http://www.costco.com/heating-systems.html

I don't know how that would work with a floating floor, I would think it might cause maximum expansion. My father installed his under tile. The installation instructions seem to indicate it it made for a tile floor.
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Offline theoman

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #65 on: August 16, 2013, 06:25:35 AM »
It's my understanding that you can't (or shouldn't) do under-floor heating under a floating floor. It's inefficient, for one thing. Also, early under-floor heating was actually too warm and bad for you. People were getting blood clots in their legs and stuff. I can imagine that a cheap mat directly under a floating floor (the sub-floor should be poured over the heating tubes) would have the same issues.

Offline phillamb168

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #66 on: August 16, 2013, 06:54:13 AM »
It's my understanding that you can't (or shouldn't) do under-floor heating under a floating floor. It's inefficient, for one thing. Also, early under-floor heating was actually too warm and bad for you. People were getting blood clots in their legs and stuff. I can imagine that a cheap mat directly under a floating floor (the sub-floor should be poured over the heating tubes) would have the same issues.

The blood clots thing is something I've heard a lot from my French colleagues. I am guessing this may be one of those things that Europeans believe for whatever reason. I.e., 'air conditioning is bad for your health' and 'fresh corn is only for feeding animals.'
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #67 on: August 16, 2013, 07:47:42 AM »
It's my understanding that you can't (or shouldn't) do under-floor heating under a floating floor. It's inefficient, for one thing. Also, early under-floor heating was actually too warm and bad for you. People were getting blood clots in their legs and stuff. I can imagine that a cheap mat directly under a floating floor (the sub-floor should be poured over the heating tubes) would have the same issues.

Also these are two completely different things, I'm talking about electrical under-floor which is a thin mat with a low-voltage heating wire (like an electric blanket) and the This Old House guys have installed them before, I think you're talking about liquid-based radiant heat taking the place of traditional heaters.

We just want something to keep our feet warm during the (long) winter, the main heat in the house is generated by radiators and a big ol wood-burning fireplace.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #68 on: August 19, 2013, 06:41:31 AM »
How do you guys handle compost? I am liking these flush counter-mounted bins.
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Offline theoman

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #69 on: August 19, 2013, 06:56:35 AM »
I have a plastic bin with a charcoal filter that I keep under the sink and use when the weather sucks or when I'm just too lazy. Otherwise I walk out to the compost bin with a plate or bag when I'm cleaning up. Even a day or two under the sink, stuff gets nasty. It's best just to deal with it right away. It would be nice to have a hole in the counter to just scrape stuff into, but I can't imagine how that would really make things easier overall. You still have to take the stuff out, so the receptacle would have to be easy to remove. That would mean pulling it up through the counter top. Climbing under the counter to unscrew it would be annoying.

Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #70 on: August 19, 2013, 07:02:59 AM »
I have a container in my pull out trash area. The back part holds the compost bin, the front the garbage.
http://www.rev-a-shelf.com/p-448-single-soft-close-top-mount-1-5-face-frame-wood-waste-containers.aspx

EDIT:
This may be what we have, either way you get the drift.
http://www.rev-a-shelf.com/p-297-single-top-mount-1-5-face-frame-wood-waste-containers.aspx?variant=967
« Last Edit: August 19, 2013, 10:11:57 AM by MDixon »
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #71 on: August 28, 2013, 04:11:32 AM »
One thing I'd like to do is to do cabinet facing on the fridge. But there are no french door fridges here that are sold without front panels - everything has pre-finished fronts on it, sometimes curvy fake stainless type deals. I'd rather put together my own cabinet frames for them, but is it possible to retroactively turn a non-built-in fridge into a built-in one? I usually just google about things like this, but I don't even know what to call it.
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Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #72 on: August 29, 2013, 05:29:07 AM »
I don't know how they do things in France, but most of the fridges with a cabinet facing are reduced depth. I solved that problem by bumping out one wall to make a recess for the fridge so it did not stick out as far.

I think what you are after would be called a panel-ready refrigerator. They typically are big $$.
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Offline phillamb168

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #73 on: August 30, 2013, 07:19:50 AM »
I don't know how they do things in France, but most of the fridges with a cabinet facing are reduced depth. I solved that problem by bumping out one wall to make a recess for the fridge so it did not stick out as far.

I think what you are after would be called a panel-ready refrigerator. They typically are big $$.

Any way to DIY/force a regular fridge to be a 'panel ready' one? I only have $ as opposed to $$. For fun, I contacted Sub-Zero and Wolf to see how much they cost. The freaking ventilator hood is sold WITHOUT A VENTILATOR FAN. That being said at least they are consistent with pricing, everything costs $5,000.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Kitchen re-do
« Reply #74 on: August 30, 2013, 07:35:30 AM »
You could probably strip the exterior of the existing doors off, but who knows how much work that will take.

On our fridge, the finish panel is just that.  You can get the fridge in different finishes, so the panel must come off.  The hardware (hinges, handles) all bolt into a frame that is not integral to the finish panel.

If you stripped this off and tried to replace it with wood, the only area I see difficulty is the clearance on the doors when opening/closign.  I think this would be a problem with either a side by side or French door fridge.  There is not much space between the doors when they are closed, so you'd need a pretty thin veneer to make it work.  Probably not so much a problem with over/under styles.
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