Author Topic: Cold crash or not?  (Read 11051 times)

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8022
  • Ego ceruisam ad bibere cervisiam
    • View Profile
Re: Cold crash or not?
« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2013, 05:53:45 AM »
Bear in mind a fair amount of sediment will drop in the bottling bucket as well. I usually leave mine to rest for up to an hour and then bottle. I quit sweating about things like turbidity a very long time ago.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis

Offline PAYCHECK

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 37
    • View Profile
    • Split Hops Brewing
Re: Cold crash or not?
« Reply #16 on: December 25, 2015, 05:02:33 PM »
Will the be any benefit to doing this or am I just wasting time with the time in the fridge? 

The benefit will be less transferred sediment/trub, so long as you don't foul it up by majorly disturbing the trub layer on the bottom of the fermenter when racking.  So you in theory will have clear-er beer.  However, would I personally do this for an oatmeal stout, which I am assuming is nearly opaque black?  No i wouldn't waste time on that, but i nice IPA or dortmunder export, yeah, I would go the extra step.

Don't know how you will get less sediment/trub  transferred by putting it in the fridge after you transfer it. Cold crashing before you transfer would be they way to go. In this case it would be a waste of your time.
Important to remember that even though primary fermentation is completed, cold crashing the beer in the original primary will result in sometimes dialectal or butter flavors on the way down.  I always believe in removing the primary trub and yeast then going into a secondary fermentation at which time you can to a rest, then crash the temperature.
Brewing is all I ever think about!

Offline narvin

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2027
  • Baltimore
    • View Profile
Re: Cold crash or not?
« Reply #17 on: December 25, 2015, 05:53:00 PM »

Important to remember that even though primary fermentation is completed, cold crashing the beer in the original primary will result in sometimes dialectal or butter flavors on the way down.  I always believe in removing the primary trub and yeast then going into a secondary fermentation at which time you can to a rest, then crash the temperature.

Aside from the fact that this is a dead 2 year old thread, I also don't know where you got this fact.  I've never experienced it.
Please do not reply if your[sic] an evil alien!
Thanks

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 16912
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Cold crash or not?
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2015, 10:39:30 AM »

Important to remember that even though primary fermentation is completed, cold crashing the beer in the original primary will result in sometimes dialectal or butter flavors on the way down.  I always believe in removing the primary trub and yeast then going into a secondary fermentation at which time you can to a rest, then crash the temperature.

Aside from the fact that this is a dead 2 year old thread, I also don't know where you got this fact.  I've never experienced it.

Same here.  Hundreds of batches of personal experience and I've never seen this happen.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell