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BBQ Style

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gmac:
Is that an Egg?  I love mine. 

euge:

--- Quote from: gmac on April 10, 2014, 03:20:32 PM ---Is that an Egg?  I love mine.

--- End quote ---

I hope you got a plate setter... :)

gmac:

--- Quote from: euge on April 10, 2014, 03:39:43 PM ---
--- Quote from: gmac on April 10, 2014, 03:20:32 PM ---Is that an Egg?  I love mine.

--- End quote ---

I hope you got a plate setter... :)

--- End quote ---

You mean a "convEGGtor"?  Stupid marketing.  Yes, I love my plate setter as much as I love my egg.  Been making a lot of bacon lately, indirect smoking with apple wood.  I have a whole apple tree cut up so everything is now apple smoked...  2nd best thing I ever bought (best was an engagement ring of course - she may read this...).

euge:
I broke down and pulled the trigger on a BBQ Guru DigiQ DX2 and a PitViper fan. I'm anxiously awaiting their arrival.

Any words of advice on usage in the BGE?

mchrispen:
Euge...


I have the same setup - love it. Can't imagine smoking anything without it now.


Make sure you have a good seal on the felt of the egg. For some reason, replacing my fairly baked on old seal with a new one - really helped stabilize the temperature. Probably just helps for better convection. Also -- make sure that the pitviper fan fitting seals in properly. Ultimately you only want the air coming through the fan, and the grate door should seal up over the flange. You will need to play with the opening on the fan itself to balance how often it needs to push air. If you see the fan rapidly pulsing and smoke coming from the bottom - it needs adjustment open. I start with it about half open.


I start a very small hot fire that heats up the egg, before I stack everything in... So a small fire with a starter and just a handful of small lump charcoal, and 1 - 2 small pieces of hardwood. Let that go hot with the lid down and fully open until you heat the temp to about 50 degrees past your target temperature (say 250F or 300F). Smother or spritz that down, and then build your coals around it mixing in hardware and large chunk charcoal.  For a long smoke, you will need to fill the firebox, and I use roughly 40% cured hardwood. Let this heat/smolder until your grill dome temperature is about 10 degrees lower than your target temp. Then turn on the DigiQ and let it do its thing - pit probe at grate level. You might need to drop in a fire starter into the center if you killed the first fire too much. Then set the plate setter and your configuration. It is important to start low and let the DigiQ ramp the fire up - it doesn't do well when the fire is too hot.


I tend to let the white/grey smoke burn off first before placing any meat. The fan on the pit will cycle on and off - and try to bring your temp even with the target. This is with the plate setter and a drip pan in place under the grill grate. I also fill the pan with water, beer or cider to keep the heat somewhat moist. This also helps the smoke ring to develop. I do not use wet chips or chunks at all - no need. You should see a hazy barely blue smoke coming from the chimney. The water will boil, so you would need to replenish that occasionally.


When you are ready to place the meat - move the pit probe onto one of the meat probes at the top of the meat. I tend to wrap the wires in foil to keep them clean - so there should be room to easily clamp the alligator clip of the pit probe. There is usually a 10-15 degree temperature difference between the grill and the dome thermometer... having this right at the top of the meat seems to give a better temp. The bottom grate is fully sealed to the fan, and the top vent is cracked about halfway - you will want to check the first couple of hours regularly to make sure the grate balances with the fan input - all temperature driven.


On my Large egg - I can do three 12 pound shoulders or two well trimmed packer briskets at a time. The DigiQ really does a great job managing the temperature - last smoke (2 pork shoulders) I only opened the egg three times to replenish the water bath and spray the shoulders with cider vinegar. Took about 11 hours to bring those shoulders right to 195F, then I wrapped them in parchment and foil and let them rest in a heated cooler for about 8 hours. They were still hot as heck when I pulled them the next morning. Don't panic pushing through the plateau - seems to vary based on the meat - just keep going. If you are worried about too much bark, then tent the meats with foil after spraying with cider vinegar.


There was still enough charcoal to push another 6 hours or so - I tend to pull the remainder charcoal after it smothers and use it when grilling as there is some fat on it - and it burns a bit hotter. Only fresh lump charcoal and hardwood chunks when smoking. If your water bath doesn't boil dry - you can skim out some pork loveliness and make sauce. I pour that into a sauce pan and add a little vinegar - bring to a hard boil and spice it. Then into jars - when cooled and refridged, you can pull the fat cap off - the rest should be like jelly.


Sorry for the long post - BBQ is another passion of mine!



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