Author Topic: BBQ Style  (Read 205009 times)

Offline beerocd

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1755 on: December 13, 2011, 07:28:38 PM »
It was an intake vent issue with the WSM. Choking the fire too much, bad smoke. I'm good now, did 2 hams and 18 sausages last night. I like to take bbq to work, even eat it cold - better than subway, McD, etc., plus it doesn't cost me $12 a day.

I don't get why people put away their grills for the winter. Lawnmower makes sense, but not the grill. You don't have to stay outside with the meat, it's still a good time to drink beer, and the BBQ tastes WAY better because the other 95% of your town has put their grills away and you know you're the only one eating killer BBQ that day.
The moral majority, is neither.

Offline corkybstewart

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1756 on: December 13, 2011, 08:09:36 PM »
I don't get why people put away their grills for the winter. Lawnmower makes sense, but not the grill. You don't have to stay outside with the meat, it's still a good time to drink beer, and the BBQ tastes WAY better because the other 95% of your town has put their grills away and you know you're the only one eating killer BBQ that day.

I grill year round, regardless of the weather.  I refused to abandon my almost cooked chicken as a tornado passed over our house, a few minutes later it took out the Taco Bell down the street.  I got stuck on a drilling rig one year for New Year's Eve and didn't get home until 2 AM.  My wife had gotten steaks for us so at 2:30 AM I'm standing out in a snowstorm firing up the charcoal.
There are no flies or mosquitoes in the winter, beer stays cold, and you're not sweating over a hot grill.  Give me winter grilling anytime.
I'd really just rather be brewing in sunny Carlsbad New Mexico

Offline punatic

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1757 on: December 13, 2011, 08:37:56 PM »
What kind of drilling do you do?
There is only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way.


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Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1758 on: December 14, 2011, 10:57:51 AM »
Ron Price

Offline corkybstewart

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1759 on: December 14, 2011, 11:55:13 AM »
What kind of drilling do you do?
I run a geological services company for oil/gas exploration.  Before that I was a geological consultant for 14 years working on the rigs.
Right now most of our work is medium depth horizontal, 8000-10000' vertically and then 4000-7500' laterally.
I'd really just rather be brewing in sunny Carlsbad New Mexico

Offline punatic

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1760 on: December 14, 2011, 12:08:21 PM »
What kind of drilling do you do?
I run a geological services company for oil/gas exploration.  Before that I was a geological consultant for 14 years working on the rigs.
Right now most of our work is medium depth horizontal, 8000-10000' vertically and then 4000-7500' laterally.

Drill Baby Drill!   ;D
There is only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way.


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Offline euge

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1761 on: December 14, 2011, 12:20:34 PM »
It's amazing how things have changed in that region in the past ten years. Oil is back as a major business. Definitely not a boom but a sharp upswing.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline bo

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1762 on: December 14, 2011, 01:17:41 PM »
I still can't figure out they make that drill go horizontal and then out it where they want it and then case it with a 90 degree bend. .

Neat stuff.

Offline euge

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1763 on: December 22, 2011, 11:21:22 AM »
And chuck instead of round?

Yes, I and many others think it is a better choice for slow roasting.

I'm doing my adaptation of the AB recipe. Doctored up the juice from homemade pickled jalapeños out the garden. I wrapped the chuck-roast in a thin towel and placed it on a plate in the fridge for 24 hours. Dried it a little. Then I tied, oiled and salted per AB then seared in a hot pan. It's now resting in the marinade for the 72 hours. Will go in the oven after midnight on Sat for christmas day.

I do have a question. Some of my research show that the method calls for the roast to be seared after brining not before. I followed AB's instructions and now wondering if that was a mistake...
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1764 on: December 22, 2011, 12:00:39 PM »
I do have a question. Some of my research show that the method calls for the roast to be seared after brining not before. I followed AB's instructions and now wondering if that was a mistake...

Marinating and/or brining is typically done before any cooking. Now that is not to say it can't be done, the marinating process not only flavors the meat but also breaks down muscle and connective tissues in meats which in turn tenderizes the meat. If cooking is done before marinating/brining it can minimize the effects of this process.
Ron Price

Offline euge

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1765 on: December 22, 2011, 12:23:18 PM »
Yeah. :-[

I was about to brine the dang thing and then thought: I better check AB's recipe.  What's done is done I suppose...

Curious as to AB's rational. It's either a mistake in recipe organization or he has specific reasons for doing this. He's not 100% spot on all the time unfortunately.

Quote
Ingredients

    * 2 cups water
    * 1 cup cider vinegar
    * 1 cup red wine vinegar
    * 1 medium onion, chopped
    * 1 large carrot, chopped
    * 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt, additional for seasoning meat
    * 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    * 2 bay leaves
    * 6 whole cloves
    * 12 juniper berries
    * 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
    * 1 (3 1/2 to 4-pound) bottom round
    * 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    * 1/3 cup sugar
    * 18 dark old-fashioned gingersnaps (about 5 ounces), crushed
    * 1/2 cup seedless raisins, optional

Directions

In a large saucepan over high heat combine the water, cider vinegar, red wine vinegar, onion, carrot, salt, pepper, bay leaves, cloves, juniper, and mustard seeds. Cover and bring this to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Set aside to cool.

Pat the bottom round dry and rub with vegetable oil and salt on all sides. Heat a large saute pan over high heat; add the meat and brown on all sides, approximately 2 to 3 minutes per side.

When the marinade has cooled to a point where you can stick your finger in it and not be burned, place the meat in a non-reactive vessel and pour over the marinade. Place into the refrigerator for 3 days. If the meat is not completely submerged in the liquid, turn it over once a day.

After 3 days of marinating, preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.

Add the sugar to the meat and marinade, cover and place on the middle rack of the oven and cook until tender, approximately 4 hours.

Remove the meat from the vessel and keep warm. Strain the liquid to remove the solids. Return the liquid to the pan and place over medium-high heat. Whisk in the gingersnaps and cook until thickened, stirring occasionally. Strain the sauce through a fine mesh sieve to remove any lumps. Add the raisins if desired. Slice the meat and serve with the sauce.

« Last Edit: December 22, 2011, 12:27:18 PM by euge »
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1766 on: December 22, 2011, 12:25:11 PM »
Yeah...I see that Euge. You may try emailing him to confirm his method.
Ron Price

Offline euge

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1767 on: December 22, 2011, 12:28:17 PM »
Yeah...I see that Euge. You may try emailing him to confirm his method.

Maybe I should email Chris Kimball too. ;D
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1768 on: December 22, 2011, 12:42:03 PM »
Yeah...I see that Euge. You may try emailing him to confirm his method.

Maybe I should email Chris Kimball too. ;D

Well... you'll have to check back in with your results after you try the recipe. Let us know.  ;)
Ron Price

Offline markaberrant

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #1769 on: December 22, 2011, 01:12:46 PM »
I brown mine after brining, I thought that part of the recipe was kinda odd.