Author Topic: BBQ Style  (Read 205079 times)

Offline phillamb168

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BBQ Style
« Reply #2130 on: July 23, 2012, 12:28:44 PM »
ROOM. TEMP. ALWAYS.

:-)
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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2131 on: July 23, 2012, 12:59:26 PM »
Thank you BEER!

Offline redbeerman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2132 on: July 23, 2012, 01:07:51 PM »
CH3CH2OH - Without it, life itself would be impossible.

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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2133 on: July 23, 2012, 01:12:47 PM »
When did we switch to binary?
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2134 on: July 23, 2012, 01:42:24 PM »
When did we switch to binary?

I guess we just did today.  ???  :)
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Offline gordonstrong

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2135 on: July 23, 2012, 01:50:06 PM »
I blame Drew.
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Offline punatic

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2136 on: July 23, 2012, 02:17:18 PM »
My tuna steaks are always started at ocean temp.  Usually they were swimming around a few minutes before.

I grill them VERY lightly using AB's chimney method (concentrated intense heat & saves a lot of charcoal).  The marinade/dipping sauce from that episode is AWESOME!  I started using it for tuna steaks, but it has found its way into many of my other dishes too.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2012, 02:22:54 PM by punatic »
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Offline brewmichigan

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2137 on: July 24, 2012, 10:11:18 AM »
My tuna steaks are always started at ocean temp.  Usually they were swimming around a few minutes before.

I grill them VERY lightly using AB's chimney method (concentrated intense heat & saves a lot of charcoal).  The marinade/dipping sauce from that episode is AWESOME!  I started using it for tuna steaks, but it has found its way into many of my other dishes too.

I've used this recipe many times as well for tuna. I love the sesame seed exterior, very tasty.
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline punatic

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2138 on: July 24, 2012, 12:09:18 PM »
Yeah, Alton Brown is pretty cool, except for one major faux pas.  He tucks his aloha shirts in (semi-acceptable), and wears an undershirt underneath them.   ::)  What a dweeb!
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Offline brewmichigan

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2139 on: August 30, 2012, 07:06:59 AM »
Hey guys, doing a pulled pork this weekend for the football games. I was planning on doing my normal rub and then let it smoke at 250/300 for hours until done but I ran across this recipe on Alton Brown's website. Let me know what you think.

Application: Barbecue Pork Butt

Yield:  4 to 6 pounds pulled pork

Software:

    3 quarts water
    12 ounces kosher salt
    8 ounces  molasses
    8-10 pound boneless pork butt

Special Equipment:  Smoker and 4 ounces hickory or oak wood chunks

Procedure:

1. Place the water, salt, and molasses in a large 12-quart container and stir until the salt dissolves.  Add the pork butt to the brine and weigh down with a zip top bag filled with 2 cups of the brine to make sure it is completely submerged.

2. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Remove the pork from the brine, and pat dry.

3. Heat the smoker to 225 degrees F. Add the wood chunks, and place the pork into the smoker.  Cook until the pork reaches an internal temperature of 150 degrees F, 4 to 5 hours.

4. Once the meat reaches 140 degrees F, heat the oven to 300 degrees F.  Wrap the pork in aluminum foil and transfer to a half sheet pan. Place on the center rack and cook until the pork reaches an internal temperature of at least 200 degrees F and is tender and pulling apart easily, 3 to 5 hours. Remove from the oven and rest, covered for 30 minutes before serving.


The biggest difference for me is that I have a bone-in pork butt and not boneless. I kind of like the simplicity of the recipe. Whenever I do a pork butt I do feel the rub that is applied gets a little lost because the amount of bark to non-bark pork is skewed in the way of the non-bark pork.
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2140 on: August 30, 2012, 07:16:58 AM »
I've been thinking about brining my pork shoulder for the next go-round.  It just doesn't pull as easily as I would like, but I'm getting closer.

I don't see why you couldn't apply the rub after the brine if you wanted to.  IMO, the bark is the best part, maybe because there's a limited amount of it.
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Offline thebigbaker

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2141 on: August 30, 2012, 08:35:41 AM »
I've been thinking about brining my pork shoulder for the next go-round.  It just doesn't pull as easily as I would like, but I'm getting closer.

I don't see why you couldn't apply the rub after the brine if you wanted to.  IMO, the bark is the best part, maybe because there's a limited amount of it.

I don't think you need to "brine" the pork shoulder as there should be enough fat in the meat to keep it moist.  When you brine, you are trying to help keep the meat moist through the cooking process.  You could wet marinade for a day or so and/or inject the pork, but doing a brine, in my opinion, isn't necessary.

Getting a good rub, which helps create bark, not only adds flavor but helps keep the meat moist.  Similar to when you quickly sear meat before roasting it, basically to create an outer crust to help keep moisture in.  I like to take my rub and mix w/ a little apple juice and inject into the meat for a little extra flavor.

To get a good pull on you meat, make sure you first get the right cut, shoulder/ Boston butt are great and I prefer the bone in.  I like to smoke between 225-250 until the internal temp is 190.  You do this, it will fall apart as you take it off the smoker!  Another tip, place a pan of apple juice under the meat as it cooks.  This will help keep the meat moist and catch some of the "goodness" dropping from the meat.  Once the meat is done and you've pulled the meat, mix in some of the apple juice "drippings" to help moisten the pulled meat.  (I will also put my pan of baked beans under the meat in the smoker to add a little extra flavor to the beans).
Jeremy Baker

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Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2142 on: August 30, 2012, 09:33:21 AM »
Hey guys, doing a pulled pork this weekend for the football games. I was planning on doing my normal rub and then let it smoke at 250/300 for hours until done but I ran across this recipe on Alton Brown's website. Let me know what you think.

Application: Barbecue Pork Butt

Yield:  4 to 6 pounds pulled pork

Software:

    3 quarts water
    12 ounces kosher salt
    8 ounces  molasses
    8-10 pound boneless pork butt


I'm curious to know how the molasses will work with the pork flavor.  I typically use a dry rub for my butts which works great. Let us know how this one turns out. Post some pics!
Ron Price

Offline thebigbaker

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2143 on: August 30, 2012, 09:46:50 AM »
Curious about the molasses to!  Looking forward to the results.
Jeremy Baker

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #2144 on: August 30, 2012, 09:55:43 AM »
If you do brine the shoulders watch how much salt you put in the rub.  You can go overboard with doing both.
Clint
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