Author Topic: BBQ Style  (Read 205024 times)

Offline deepsouth

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #30 on: November 17, 2009, 07:07:57 AM »



an older picture of some wings i did when i first got my BGE.  marinated them in texas pete's wing sauce for a few hours then did a light rinse and coated them with john henry's pecan rub.

reapplied the john henry's again the morning before putting them onto a 250 degree BGE for three and a half hours, indirect.
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bottled:     white house honey ale

Offline deepsouth

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #31 on: November 17, 2009, 07:08:38 AM »
here's another older one.....


this was cooked on the mini egg.



filet mignon, asparagus (both with gorgonzola cheese (boar's head brand) and corn on the cob (my uncle's "pioneer growers").....

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Offline deepsouth

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #32 on: November 17, 2009, 07:10:06 AM »




oh wait, that is beer pron.
Hoppy Homebrewers of South Mississippi (est. 2009)

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Offline deepsouth

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #33 on: November 17, 2009, 07:10:54 AM »














the meal was much better than the pictures.
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Offline deepsouth

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #34 on: November 17, 2009, 07:11:46 AM »



steak, chicken & pineapple kabobs with teriyaki sauce and dizzy pig pineapple head.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #35 on: November 17, 2009, 07:43:30 AM »
Grilled Romaine (i used a Big Green Egg, but you can sub any other cooker)

Ingredients:
2 Romaine Hearts
Olive oil
Parmesian Cheese
Salt & Pepper
Italian Seasoning

Instructions:

Cut the Romaine Hearts down the middle. Pull off any loose external leaves. You want a small tight bunch. Brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with fresh parmesian cheese. Push some cheese into the folds of the leaves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and whatever spices you like. Put into the fridge to keep these nice and cold. Take out at the last minute.
After grilling your meat, steak, etc., crank up the heat and flames in your Green Egg. Put the Romaine Hearts face up on the grill for 2 minutes, then flip over for a few minutes. It will make your grill a bit messy, so leave the heat up to burn off that cheese.

Serve immediately. I dont add any extra dressing, but a bit of Italian or Remolaude dressing is nice.


That sounds fantastic. There's one I need to try!
Ron Price

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #36 on: November 17, 2009, 07:45:56 AM »
Balsamic Grilled Pork Chops

Description: Serves 2 or more, depending on the meat selection you make. This recipes marinade is good for Chops or tenderloins (whole) or medallions.

Ingredients:

1 Cup EVOO
Cup Basil (chopped fresh if you have it)
Cup Parsley (chopped fresh if you have it)
5 Large Garlic Cloves (minced)
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar (to taste and size of meat portions)

Instructions:

1. Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl and pour over Chops in a shallow square pan or substitute a 1 gallon freezer bag and mix/shake.
2. Place in refrigerator for 4 hours minimum and turn occasionally.
3. Remove chops from marinade and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes (discard remaining marinade).
4. While the chops are coming up to room temperature fire up the Big Green Egg and bring to a stabilized temperature of about 350 degrees.
5. Place chops directly on the grill for approximately 6 minutes per side (lid down and no peeking).
6. When internal temperature reaches 150 degrees remove from grill and let stand for at least 5 minutes before serving.


Nice! Do you have any pics?

I love Balsamic...but the real aged vinegar is outstanding as opposed to the supermarket kind.
Ron Price

Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #37 on: November 17, 2009, 07:49:11 AM »
Atomic Buffalo Turds (ABT's)

INGREDIENTS:
12 3-3 1/2 Inch Jalapenos - fresh
1 8 Ozs Pkg. Cream Cheese
12 Ozs. Bacon (regular sliced-NOT thick sliced)
1 Package Smoked Cocktail Wieners (Lil' Smokeys)  (you can substitute any meat here )
Dizzy Pig Red Eye Express rub  (or your favorite seasoning)
Wood Chunks (Apple, Hickory, or Guava Wood work well)




Procedure:
1 Wash, remove stems and halve jalapenos lengthwise. Only cut the stem off, don't cut
2 the end of jalapeno off to remove the stem. If the jalapenos are pretty fresh. you can
3 pull the stems off fairly easy. Remove seeds and veins (leave veins in if you would
4 like a hotter ABT).
5 Fill jalapeno halves with cream cheese, then top with a cocktail wiener. Put the two
6 halves together and wrap the whole thing with a piece of bacon. Secure each end of
7 the bacon with a toothpick.
8 Sprinkle a liberal amount of DP Red Eye Express rub all over the surface of the
9 bacon.
10 Stabilize grill at 350°.
11 Place a drip pan on regular grid to catch the drippings.
12 Put 2-3 chunks of wood on the coals and place ABT’s on the raised grid.
13 Cook about 45 minutes, then turn them over to crisp up bottom side of bacon, and
14 cook for an additional 15 minutes.
15 Allow to cool several minutes before serving.








photos borrowed from "rick's tropical delight".  thanks rick.

Well the name isn't exactly appealing.  ;D

But hotdamn!

I'm getting hungry now!

This is a must try! 8)
Ron Price

Offline deepsouth

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #38 on: November 17, 2009, 08:12:35 AM »
went 2-1-2 on these at 250 degrees.... coated with some regular mustard... dizzy pig dizzy dust and red eye express, john henry pecan rub... an hour in foil with some sweet baby ray's... finishing them off with some sweet baby rays with some dizzy pig jamaican firewalk mixed in.... ought to go good with some southern pecan i think.









.
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bottled:     white house honey ale

Offline deepsouth

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #39 on: November 17, 2009, 08:13:09 AM »
sorry, but i don't have pics on the computer of these.



Balsamic Grilled Pork Chops

Description: Serves 2 or more, depending on the meat selection you make. This recipes marinade is good for Chops or tenderloins (whole) or medallions.

Ingredients:

1 Cup EVOO
Cup Basil (chopped fresh if you have it)
Cup Parsley (chopped fresh if you have it)
5 Large Garlic Cloves (minced)
1/3 Cup Balsamic Vinegar (to taste and size of meat portions)

Instructions:

1. Combine ingredients in a mixing bowl and pour over Chops in a shallow square pan or substitute a 1 gallon freezer bag and mix/shake.
2. Place in refrigerator for 4 hours minimum and turn occasionally.
3. Remove chops from marinade and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes (discard remaining marinade).
4. While the chops are coming up to room temperature fire up the Big Green Egg and bring to a stabilized temperature of about 350 degrees.
5. Place chops directly on the grill for approximately 6 minutes per side (lid down and no peeking).
6. When internal temperature reaches 150 degrees remove from grill and let stand for at least 5 minutes before serving.


Nice! Do you have any pics?

I love Balsamic...but the real aged vinegar is outstanding as opposed to the supermarket kind.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 08:15:55 AM by deepsouth »
Hoppy Homebrewers of South Mississippi (est. 2009)

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bottled:     white house honey ale

Offline akr71

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #40 on: November 17, 2009, 08:14:23 AM »
Beer is a great addition to a BBQ marinade or sauce, but the one flavor that I really love in a BBQ mop sauce is Jack Daniels. I'll add it to my basic BBQ sauce. It has a flavor that lends itself well to smokey Q. Here's another southern recipe.

http://southernfood.about.com/od/bbqsaucemarinade/r/blbb227.htm

How about BBQ sauce?  Should we start a new thread for homemade BBQ sauce or stick them here?  Beer always goes into my BBQ sauce - preferably a stout or brown ale.  Whisky or rye too if I've got it laying around and I deem it cheap enough to pour into a sauce.  Once I made a 'Mexican Maple' BBQ Sauce - liberal doses of Tequila & Maple Syrup and I jumped up the heat.

I'll post my entire recipe, but I imagine it would be better to dedicate a new thread for this.  I'd love to see what other folks put into their sauce.
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada

Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #41 on: November 17, 2009, 09:00:08 AM »
Beer is a great addition to a BBQ marinade or sauce, but the one flavor that I really love in a BBQ mop sauce is Jack Daniels. I'll add it to my basic BBQ sauce. It has a flavor that lends itself well to smokey Q. Here's another southern recipe.

http://southernfood.about.com/od/bbqsaucemarinade/r/blbb227.htm

How about BBQ sauce?  Should we start a new thread for homemade BBQ sauce or stick them here?  Beer always goes into my BBQ sauce - preferably a stout or brown ale.  Whisky or rye too if I've got it laying around and I deem it cheap enough to pour into a sauce.  Once I made a 'Mexican Maple' BBQ Sauce - liberal doses of Tequila & Maple Syrup and I jumped up the heat.

I'll post my entire recipe, but I imagine it would be better to dedicate a new thread for this.  I'd love to see what other folks put into their sauce.


Here's a previous post. I like to add some Bock beer to this one. Sometimes I'll add some Jack Daniels. Excellent sauce. A staple in my house.

Here's the BBQ guru Steven Raichlen's KC style BBQ Sauce recipe. I give it the bluesman's twist by adding some New Mexico chili powder to it. A fantastic all- around grilling sauce. Slather it on anythiing form babybacks to burgers.

Basic Barbecue Sauce Recipe
This is the type of sauce that most people in the United States think of as barbecue sauce: Brown sugar and molasses make it sweet; liquid smoke makes it smoky--there isn't a Kansas City pit boss around who wouldn't recognize it as local. Slather it on ribs and chicken, spoon it over pork shoulder, and serve it with anything else you may fancy. You won't be disappointed.

Makes about 2-1/2 cups


2 cups ketchup
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons prepared mustard
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 tablespoon of your favorite barbecue rub
2 teaspoons liquid smoke
1/2 teaspoon black pepper


Combine all the ingredients in a nonreactive saucepan and bring slowly to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and gently simmer the sauce until dark, thick, and richly flavored, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the sauce to clean (or even sterile) jars and store in the refrigerator. It will keep for several months.

« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 10:36:18 AM by bluesman »
Ron Price

Offline akr71

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #42 on: November 17, 2009, 10:25:41 AM »
Here's my BBQ sauce.  I usually make it once or twice a year - I make a big batch & then can it in mason jars.  I start with homemade 'ketchup' - my wife & daughter love ketchup, but don't touch this stuff, so it all goes into the sauce.
Tomato Ketchup
     10 lb Tomato; totally ripe
      1    Bell pepper, red; seeded
           -& chopped
      4 lg Onion; chopped
  1 1/2 c  Vinegar, cider
      2    Garlic clove; crushed
      1 ts Peppercorns
      1 ts Allspice, whole
      1 ts Cloves, whole
      5    Cinnamon stick
      1 ts Celery seed
    1/2 t  Mustard, dry
    1/4 ts Cayenne
      4 T  Sugar, brown
      3 T  Sugar, white
      1 ts Salt

Cut tomatoes in quarters and puree them in food processor along with bell pepper. Strain puree through a coarse sieve to move skins and seeds. (You can dump the puree into a colander and work it through with your hands until there is nothing left in the colander but a dryish pulp of skins and seeds.  I save the pulp for later - see below)  Now puree onions, combine with tomato and pepper puree, and pour into a large stainless steel or enameled kettle.  Cook and stir occasionally over low heat until it is reduced by about a third and is considerably thicker. Meanwhile put garlic, peppercorns, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, and celery seed into the vinegar in a small pot and simmer covered for 1/2 hour to steep spices in the vinegar. Pour about half the spiced vinegar through a tea strainer into the thickened tomato mixture.  Stir. Also add sugar, mustard, cayenne, and salt at this point.  Here is where the tasting comes in.  You can adjust any of these ingredients to suit you.  You can add more spiced vinegar.  Or a little plain vinegar.  More or less sugar, mustard, cayenne.  Just sort of tinker with it.  Cook it some more, stirring often, until it looks like catsup should ook. Taste and adjust again.  You may notice that it looks slightly curdled.  Not to worry.  Hit it a lick in the food processor.  Smooths right out.

Next add some homemade pepper sauce - usually about a pint from the recipe below, but I've use Tobasco in a pinch.
Hot Sauce
Ingredients:
2 cups assorted chiles, freshly picked, cleaned, and stemmed (mostly red, but you can mix a few greenies in for spice...experiment with what you like, but "fleshier" chiles make a smoother sauce. Also, I leave the seeds intact....too much bother to take them out, and I think they add a nice flavor.)   I add about 2 or 3 tablespoons of the tomato pulp saved from the ketchup - it helps even out the color especially if you end up with a bunch of different colored peppers - brown pepper sauce is a little odd looking.
1 ts kosher salt
1/2 onion, red or white
Juice of 1/2 lime or lemon (I actually prefer lime, but only had lemon for this shoot)
3 large cloves Garlic
1 Cup White Vinegar, heated to almost boiling (turn your rangehood on for this one...fumes are pretty strong. I usually use the microwave for about 90 seconds....be careful though as vinegar boils sooner than water.)
Freshly ground black pepper
Put it all in a blender and puree until smooth.....may need to scrape it down a couple times.
Be careful when you take the lid off the blender....this stuff will burn your nosehairs out.
Cool, bottle, and age. You can start using it right away, but it will have a definite edge to it. Besides, it's still warm so it'll just be hot and salty. Makes about 3 cups of hot sauce.  After a night in the fridge, it's ready for using. As it ages, it will mellow and blend, but loses some heat. You'll find that when "fresh", it has a hard bite up front. But as it ages a week or so it's a nice overall heat that you'll love.

Now the tinkering begins! I reduce about 4 bottles of homebrew (stouts or brown ales preferred) and then add it to the ketchup along with Brown sugar (about 2 cups), soy sauce, Worstershire sauce, as much pepper sauce as you think it needs, marjoram, thyme, rosemary, more garlic.  Let it simmer and reduce.  Maple syrup/Molasses both work to sweeten and thicken it - corn syrup can be used to thicken it. Wait until near the end because the longer you have the syrup or molasses on the heat, the greater the chance you'll scortch it (I learned the hard way).

The ketchup, hotsauce and brown sugar is the base - every thing else is personal taste and each time it comes out a little different.  Although my wife says each time it gets better and better.  She hates when I make BBQ sauce because it takes the whole day, hates it more when we run out of the homemade stuff.
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada

Offline bluesman

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #43 on: November 17, 2009, 10:56:53 AM »
Andy,

I am a BBQ and hot sauce fanatic. I like trying different styles of BBQ sauce. There are twelve different kinds of sauces, categorized by region.

1. Kansas City Sweet Sauce - probably my favorite.
2. South Carolina Mustard Sauce - great with pork.
3. East Caroilina Mop Sauce - speaks for itself. mop it on!
4. Lexington Dip (a.k.a.Western Carolina or Piedmont Dip)
5. Texas Mop Sauce - another great sauce!
6. Tennessee Whiskey Sauce - I love Jack Daniels in my sauces.
7. Louisiana Hot Sauce - an American staple
8. Memphis Dry Rub - can you say ribs!
9. Fruit Sauces
10. Sweet Glazes
11. Novelty Sauces

There is probably as many variations and iterations of each style that you could spend the rest of your life studying.

An american creation tracing back to Christopher Columbus.

« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 07:37:06 PM by bluesman »
Ron Price

Offline akr71

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Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #44 on: November 18, 2009, 06:50:01 AM »
There is a sauce thread now - I apologize for the interruption - back to your regularly scheduled programming  :-[

& I'll get back to drooling over those tasty pics, even though its only 10am...
Andy

Amherst, NS - Canada