Author Topic: BBQ Style  (Read 204972 times)

Offline redbeerman

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1713
  • On the banks of the mighty Susquehanna
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #675 on: November 24, 2010, 07:59:27 AM »
Sitting here drooling like a dog.

+1000
CH3CH2OH - Without it, life itself would be impossible.

[441, 112.1deg] AR

Jim

Offline gordonstrong

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1355
    • View Profile
    • BJCP
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #676 on: November 24, 2010, 09:58:39 AM »
Quote
A turducken is a dish consisting of a de-boned chicken stuffed into a de-boned duck, which itself is stuffed into a de-boned turkey. The word turducken is a portmanteau of turkey, duck, and chicken or hen.

This quote amuses me since it implies that a reader of this thread wouldn't know what a 'turducken' is, but would know what 'portmanteau' means.  Not cutting on anyone; it just amused me.

Personally, I don't think I'd make a turducken because I enjoy duck so much on its own.  Roast duck is great on its own (use American, French, or Chinese recipe variations), but I also sometimes like to buy several, break them down, make confit with the legs, cook the breasts on their own or make them into sausage, and render the fat because you can never have too much duck fat around.  Fry potatoes in it sometime.  Wow.
Gordon Strong • Beavercreek, Ohio • AHA Member since 1997 • Twitter: GordonStrong

Offline deepsouth

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1008
  • Brew Maison
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #677 on: November 24, 2010, 10:05:07 AM »
grilled everything but the cheese..... 



i'll be putting on four boston butts tomorrow....  one for me, one for my dad and two for our homebrew club christmas party on december 4th (the same day as my bjcp exam, yikes).
Hoppy Homebrewers of South Mississippi (est. 2009)

AHA# 196703

bottled:     white house honey ale

Offline MrNate

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 967
  • Bridgewater, NJ
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #678 on: November 24, 2010, 10:11:01 AM »
Quote
A turducken is a dish consisting of a de-boned chicken stuffed into a de-boned duck, which itself is stuffed into a de-boned turkey. The word turducken is a portmanteau of turkey, duck, and chicken or hen.

This quote amuses me since it implies that a reader of this thread wouldn't know what a 'turducken' is, but would know what 'portmanteau' means.  Not cutting on anyone; it just amused me.

Thank you. I hate that word, by the way. It reeks of foppery.
“If one's actions are honest, one does not need the predated confidence of others, only their rational perception.”

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7214
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #679 on: November 24, 2010, 10:44:05 AM »
Great job on the fattie Tom. Looks delicioso.

We still need a drooling emoticon.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline roguejim

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 462
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #680 on: November 24, 2010, 01:12:34 PM »
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.

13 lbs is a good size to smoke.

Brine the Turkey for 24 hrs.

2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!



Is the oil for sauteeing? Or, add to the brine?  How much?

Do you cook the brine first?

Are you putting the turkey directly on the smoker's grate, or in a pan to retain the juices for gravy?

Finally...Any seasoning to go on the bird?  Basting?

Thanks.  I'm firing up the Traeger and using your brine recipe.  I used an Alton Brown recipe last year which was a vegetable broth based brine.  Yours looks more appetizing.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2010, 01:19:23 PM by roguejim »

Offline markaberrant

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 251
  • Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
    • View Profile
    • ALES Club
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #681 on: November 24, 2010, 02:34:42 PM »
In case you missed it, it is really cold in the NW and we've had a blizzard (this is all NW relative).  It was interesting to bbq when the weather is this cold, it averaged about 18F for the 4 hours it took to smoke (and it's currently 13.5F) so I had to heat the grill more than usual to keep a good temp.

Looks great Tom, but I think I can one up you!  We have had a ton of snow already this year including another foot or so in the last 24 hours.

Anyways, later today, I am going to smoke a 9.5lb pork butt overnight, and then bring to a potluck lunch at work tomorrow.  The temp is 1F right now, but expected to drop to -11F overnight (-26F with the windchill).

Should be interesting.

By the way, it was -13F when I brewed last Friday (-26F with the windchill).  Even in an attached garage with the door only open a foot or two, and a propane burner givin 'er, it was damn cold!

Offline bluesman

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8678
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #682 on: November 24, 2010, 03:44:47 PM »
I'm going to smoke a 13 pounder and cook a 12 pounder in the oven.  Any suggestions for a brining recipe for the smoked one?  It will be smoked over applewood probably, with maybe a little pecan thrown in there.

13 lbs is a good size to smoke.

Brine the Turkey for 24 hrs.

2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter

Smoke the Turkey at 350F for 2.5 hrs to acieve an internal temp of 169F.

Good Luck!



Is the oil for sauteeing? Or, add to the brine?  How much?

Do you cook the brine first?

Are you putting the turkey directly on the smoker's grate, or in a pan to retain the juices for gravy?

Finally...Any seasoning to go on the bird?  Basting?

Thanks.  I'm firing up the Traeger and using your brine recipe.  I used an Alton Brown recipe last year which was a vegetable broth based brine.  Yours looks more appetizing.

Here's the recipe.

1 12-14 lb turkey
2 quarts apple juice
1 lb brown sugar
1 cup kosher salt
3 quarts water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, sliced thin
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
vegetable oil or melted, unsalted butter
Combine apple juice, brown sugar, and salt in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring to dissolve. Boil for one minute, remove from heat, let mixture come to room temperature, then refrigerate to 40*F.

In a large non-reactive container, combine the apple juice mixture with the remaining ingredients and stir. Place rinsed, drained whole turkey into the brine. Use a heavy weight to keep the bird submerged, if necessary.

Refrigerate for 24 hours. Remove turkey from brine, rinse inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Fold wing tips under the bird. Brush outside surface with vegetable oil or melted butter.

Cook at 325-350*F to 160-165*F in the breast, 170-175*F in the thigh, approximately 2-1/2 to 3 hours. Cover loosely with foil and let rest 30 minutes before carving.

No seasonings are necessary.

Good Luck!

Post some pics.  8)
Ron Price

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8130
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #683 on: November 25, 2010, 12:18:57 AM »
Thanks guys, it was a lot of fun and really not that hard, I'll be doing that again.  You've definitely got to serve it to a crowd or make it smaller though, even with 6 adults eating it there was a lot left over.  Not any more though, it's gone now. :)

In case you missed it, it is really cold in the NW and we've had a blizzard (this is all NW relative).  It was interesting to bbq when the weather is this cold, it averaged about 18F for the 4 hours it took to smoke (and it's currently 13.5F) so I had to heat the grill more than usual to keep a good temp.

Looks great Tom, but I think I can one up you!  We have had a ton of snow already this year including another foot or so in the last 24 hours.

Anyways, later today, I am going to smoke a 9.5lb pork butt overnight, and then bring to a potluck lunch at work tomorrow.  The temp is 1F right now, but expected to drop to -11F overnight (-26F with the windchill).

Should be interesting.

By the way, it was -13F when I brewed last Friday (-26F with the windchill).  Even in an attached garage with the door only open a foot or two, and a propane burner givin 'er, it was damn cold!
It's much colder in lots of places, but this is record lows for us this time of year! :)  We're wimps, what can I say?  It was one of the reasons I moved here though, I'm not in to temperature extremes. ;)

I think the coldest it's ever been when I brewed was about 25F.  Not that bad, I know, although it was when we had no power for several days and the house was only 40F so there was really no way to get warm except to huddle close to the mash tun. ;D  I can't even imagine brewing when the wind chill puts it under 0, we had weather like that when I was moving here from IN - I left a few days late, it was too cold to pack my truck.

I've got pork butt on my list to do again soon, but I'm doing another bacon weave tomorrow - this one will be wrapped around a butterflied turkey breast stuff with sausage dressing.  I can't wait. :)
Tom Schmidlin

Offline nicneufeld

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1049
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #684 on: November 25, 2010, 06:03:31 AM »
I've been up for almost an hour and a half now trying to get some charcoal to light.  Usually I cheat getting charcoal lit by starting a few coals of that "instant light" charcoal, which are soaked in fluid, and then adding regular charcoal.  Today it looks like I got a bum bag of instant charcoal, because they wouldn't light any easier than normal charcoal.  I ended up breaking a couple lighters and going through half a box of matches and burning a LOT of leaves to get things hot enough to light the charcoal...

But...I now have a cajun rubbed spatchcocked turkey on the smoker.  Deboned the breast section entirely, phew that was a lot of work yesterday.  That turkey got a lot of calcium or something!

Offline beerocd

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1400
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #685 on: November 25, 2010, 06:10:51 AM »
I've been up for almost an hour and a half now trying to get some charcoal to light.  Usually I cheat getting charcoal lit by starting a few coals of that "instant light" charcoal, which are soaked in fluid, and then adding regular charcoal.  Today it looks like I got a bum bag of instant charcoal, because they wouldn't light any easier than normal charcoal.  I ended up breaking a couple lighters and going through half a box of matches and burning a LOT of leaves to get things hot enough to light the charcoal...

Maybe you can score one of these on a black friday special...


Good luck, hope it turns out great!
The moral majority, is neither.

Offline markaberrant

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 251
  • Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
    • View Profile
    • ALES Club
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #686 on: November 25, 2010, 06:16:42 AM »
my overnight pork butt is done after 12.5 hours.  Temp held steady all night long, and still lots of charcoal in the box.  Looks and smells great.

Offline nicneufeld

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1049
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #687 on: November 25, 2010, 06:21:47 AM »
See, I have a chimney, and I use it, but I don't have paraffin starters, or other sorts of flammable items to start them with.  Some days the wind and the cold just make getting a fire started nearly impossible without a "jump start".  

Guess I better go check on it...hopefully the damn thing isn't hovering at 120 degrees!

EDIT:  no worries, cooking nicely at 350 degrees!  That's perfect IMO, I'm not looking to smoke this low and slow, I want smoke, but I also want crisp skin.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 06:24:54 AM by nicneufeld »

Offline beerocd

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1400
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #688 on: November 25, 2010, 06:28:53 AM »
See, I have a chimney, and I use it, but I don't have paraffin starters, or other sorts of flammable items to start them with.

2 sheets of newspaper, balled up on the underside - whoosh! Heap Big Fire.
Never used paraffin - (tea candle basically?)
The moral majority, is neither.

Offline deepsouth

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1008
  • Brew Maison
    • View Profile
Re: BBQ Style
« Reply #689 on: November 25, 2010, 07:12:45 AM »
I've been up for almost an hour and a half now trying to get some charcoal to light.  Usually I cheat getting charcoal lit by starting a few coals of that "instant light" charcoal, which are soaked in fluid, and then adding regular charcoal.  Today it looks like I got a bum bag of instant charcoal, because they wouldn't light any easier than normal charcoal.  I ended up breaking a couple lighters and going through half a box of matches and burning a LOT of leaves to get things hot enough to light the charcoal...

But...I now have a cajun rubbed spatchcocked turkey on the smoker.  Deboned the breast section entirely, phew that was a lot of work yesterday.  That turkey got a lot of calcium or something!


sounds like your lump may have gotten damp somehow.

i start my grill with a pair of welder's gloves, safety goggles and a bernzomatic mapp gas torch. 
Hoppy Homebrewers of South Mississippi (est. 2009)

AHA# 196703

bottled:     white house honey ale