Author Topic: Centennial Fruit loop beers  (Read 2083 times)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Centennial Fruit loop beers
« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2013, 07:13:21 AM »
I would try letting your beer clear a bit, rack to secondary and then do your dry hopping. Stan Hieronymous wrote an article in Zymurgy earlier this year about dry hopping experiments he did. The takeaway was that he felt that hop aroma and flavor was better in beers dry hopped this way. The reason: dry hopping in primary with a fair amount of yeast still in suspension can produce some undesireable aromas/flavors from the interaction of hop compounds with excess yeast. I switched to doing this and I like my hop aroma/flavor better than before - it seems cleaner and better. I'd be curious to see if it prevented this in the future for you. It might.
What I got from Stan's NHC talk and articles is that some yeast still in the active stage will give a bio-transformation into aromas that you won't get otherwise. Those are aromas that are desire able, and some brewers like Matt Brynildson of Firestone Walker dry hop in primary with about 1 Plato to go, and may add mor dry hops later. On the other hand, Vinnie Cilurzo drops the yeast to dry hop. Both techniques work, I think one needs to think of the desired finished beer aroma, the hops being used, and then select the process to achieve the results.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Centennial Fruit loop beers
« Reply #31 on: December 08, 2013, 07:21:07 AM »
I find centennial to be the cleanest, perhaps "brightest", of the "C" hops with the best (to my pallet) American IPA citrus-grapefruity aroma and flavor profile. I have never encountered "fruit loops" which, to me, sound like a fermentation issue.

As far as dry hopping with yeast still present IME if the beer is still too hazy with yeast and you dry hop the yeast will pull a lot of aroma down with them as they drop out and you may have to dry hop again. I try to dry hop once the beer clears some. I've gone as far as fined in primary, dumped yeast after a week and dry hopped after beer brightened.
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Offline denny

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Re: Centennial Fruit loop beers
« Reply #32 on: December 08, 2013, 11:07:41 AM »
I would try letting your beer clear a bit, rack to secondary and then do your dry hopping. Stan Hieronymous wrote an article in Zymurgy earlier this year about dry hopping experiments he did. The takeaway was that he felt that hop aroma and flavor was better in beers dry hopped this way. The reason: dry hopping in primary with a fair amount of yeast still in suspension can produce some undesireable aromas/flavors from the interaction of hop compounds with excess yeast. I switched to doing this and I like my hop aroma/flavor better than before - it seems cleaner and better. I'd be curious to see if it prevented this in the future for you. It might.
[/quote

I went back to racking to secondary before dry hopping after reading that article.  It seemed to clear up some off flavors I was getting and it's now my standard practice.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Centennial Fruit loop beers
« Reply #33 on: December 08, 2013, 11:23:23 AM »
I would try letting your beer clear a bit, rack to secondary and then do your dry hopping. Stan Hieronymous wrote an article in Zymurgy earlier this year about dry hopping experiments he did. The takeaway was that he felt that hop aroma and flavor was better in beers dry hopped this way. The reason: dry hopping in primary with a fair amount of yeast still in suspension can produce some undesireable aromas/flavors from the interaction of hop compounds with excess yeast. I switched to doing this and I like my hop aroma/flavor better than before - it seems cleaner and better. I'd be curious to see if it prevented this in the future for you. It might.
[/quote

I went back to racking to secondary before dry hopping after reading that article.  It seemed to clear up some off flavors I was getting and it's now my standard practice.

Yeah, for the first IPA I made after reading that article I used the exact recipe I used for the previous one (and I don't do that very often) with the same hop schedule.  Same exact hops too - I had bulk in the freezer. I felt that the hop character was noticeably better. Everybody's process is different, but it worked for me convincingly.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2013, 01:27:29 PM by HoosierBrew »
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