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Alpha Amylase conversion post mash

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denny:

--- Quote from: ynotbrusum on August 02, 2013, 04:26:54 AM ---So on another thread about coolers, Denny posted a chart that showed the conversion temps and it got me to thinking, which isn't always a good thing.  Will your wort collected in a batch sparge continue to convert sugars as you heat it up through 158-160?  If so, could you effectively do a Hockhurz type mash by heating the wort up and holding it at 158 for a few minutes before you head to the boil?  This would help guys who worry about temperature loss in a cooler and don't want to thin out the mash more with a hot water infusion...

--- End quote ---

Theoretically, yes.  Since the enzymes are in the wort, not so much in the grain at that point, it will keep converting until you denature the enzymes.  I don't know how much difference it would make.

denny:

--- Quote from: mtnrockhopper on August 02, 2013, 06:04:18 AM ---I think the answer is a definate maybe.  Conversion will continue. I think starches tend to stay in the grain until they are converted into sugars, so there may not be many starches to convert in wort. Probably the bigger problem is that starches converted to simple sugars obviously can't be converted back into complex sugars. So after an hour at low temp, raising to a higher temp won't build the body back up unless there are unconverted starches.
 
Of course, this answer is mostly brain splatter.

--- End quote ---

Good answer IMO!

ynotbrusum:
I had a second thought on this and that is - if the cooler mash temperature were not held for the traditional "longer time frame", but rather in the 45 minute range and "incomplete conversion" occurs, will the incomplete conversion allow for the complex sugars to be made from the starches at the higher temperature if the wort is then being heated into the higher range and held there for another 30 minutes?  I may just try this out to see what happens....

More brain splatter (is that where the truncation "BS" is coming from?) :o
 

denny:

--- Quote from: ynotbrusum on August 05, 2013, 03:10:06 PM ---I had a second thought on this and that is - if the cooler mash temperature were not held for the traditional "longer time frame", but rather in the 45 minute range and "incomplete conversion" occurs, will the incomplete conversion allow for the complex sugars to be made from the starches at the higher temperature if the wort is then being heated into the higher range and held there for another 30 minutes?  I may just try this out to see what happens....

More brain splatter (is that where the truncation "BS" is coming from?) :o
 

--- End quote ---

Yeah, that probably would happen to some extent.

narvin:

--- Quote from: ynotbrusum on August 05, 2013, 03:10:06 PM ---I had a second thought on this and that is - if the cooler mash temperature were not held for the traditional "longer time frame", but rather in the 45 minute range and "incomplete conversion" occurs, will the incomplete conversion allow for the complex sugars to be made from the starches at the higher temperature if the wort is then being heated into the higher range and held there for another 30 minutes?  I may just try this out to see what happens....
 

--- End quote ---

Isn't this a classic step mash?  145 for 40 minutes, 158 for 30.

Or do you mean the second step is in the kettle?  Again, I don't know how many of the unconverted starches carry over.  I know a turbid lambic mash uses hot sparge water (200+) to dissolve as much of this starch as possible, since it's desirable for lambic fermentation.

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