Author Topic: Mild Brown Ale  (Read 1504 times)

Offline In The Sand

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
    • View Profile
Mild Brown Ale
« on: July 31, 2013, 08:59:06 AM »
We've been asked to brew a couple of styles for an event at my day job.  I'll be serving to people that I have no idea if they like craft beer or not.  So my thoughts were a citrusy/fruity IPA and a Brown Ale.  I've never done a brown ale, but I've read up on the style.  I think this would be a nice alternative to those who don't care for IPA's.  I'm not sure about the specialty malts here.  Have I overdone it?  I've never used Victory or Amber so I'm not 100% sure if both are needed or if the flavors will be complimentary.  Also, could use suggestions on yeast strain.  I figured something with low esters like 1056, but there may be a better alternative.  So from what I've gathered, I'm thinking the brown would look something like this:

Batch Size: 10.00 gal     
Boil Size: 12.00 gal
Estimated OG: 1.048 SG
Estimated Color: 15.8 SRM
Estimated IBU: 18.8 IBU
Brewhouse Efficiency: 72.00 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amount        Item                                                         % or IBU     
14.00 lb     Standard 2-Row (2.0 SRM)                            75.68 %       
3.00 lb       Amber Malt (22.0 SRM)                                 16.22 %       
0.50 lb       Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM)            2.70 %       
0.50 lb       Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM)                            2.70 %       
0.50 lb       Victory Malt (25.0 SRM)                                  2.70 %       
0.50 oz       Warrior [15.00 %]  (60 min)                         14.1 IBU     
1.00 oz       Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %]  (15 min)           4.7 IBU       
1.00 oz       Williamette [5.50 %]  (0 min)             -           
2.00 items    Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 min)         
2 Pkgs        American Ale (Wyeast Labs #1056)         


Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Medium Body, Batch Sparge
Total Grain Weight: 18.50 lb
----------------------------
Single Infusion, Medium Body, Batch Sparge
Step Time     Name               Description                         Step Temp     
60 min        Mash In            Add 9.25 gal of water at 164.0 F    154.0 F       
Trey W.

Offline bboy9000

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
  • KCMO
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 09:08:52 AM »
1.048 isn't really a mild by BJCP standards but still sessionable and I'm sure your friends will enjoy it.  As far as yeast WLP 007 or WY 1098 may be worth considering.  WLP 002 or WY 1968 may be good too but probably not as clean depending on the fermentation temperature.

*EDIT*. I did use some victory on an ESB and it was a little overpowering.  I think I used 1 pound but I don't have my notes in front of me right now.  For a brown ale you probably want something a little darker than C-60.  Maybe some pale chocolate or dehusked Carfa I or II.  I've never used amber malt before so I'm not sure what kind of contribution this would make to a mild brown ale.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2013, 09:15:20 AM by bboy9000 »
Brian
mobrewer

Offline gymrat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 866
  • Ralph's Brewery
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2013, 09:18:15 AM »
I wouldn't do the whirfloc for more than 10 minutes. I usually boil mine for 5. I read somewhere that 15 minutes is long enough to denature it.
Ralph's Brewery
Topeka, KS

Online mabrungard

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1426
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2013, 09:54:37 AM »
I'm a big fan of Milds and its a standard house brew for me. 

As mentioned, 1.048 is kind of big for a Mild.  However, I can tell you that you don't want to go too small either.  I typically shoot for the upper end of the range for the style: 1.038.  That is a good medium on keeping it small while providing enough malt for flavor. 

I tried a popular recipe posted on HomebrewTalk, Reapers Mild, but I found it far too crystally-sweet and underattenuated.  With 20% crystal malt in that recipe, its too much.  That is a fault I also find with Rogue beers...they use too much crystal malt.  I prefer to keep the crystal malt at less than 10%.  I really like the 75L Simpsons crystal.  One thing that I did appreciate that this recipe brought to my attention was pale chocolate malt.  This is truly a superb malt for adding color and a restrained roast character to a beer.  Around 3% is good in a Mild.

I find another asset in a Mild is to brew with mild malt as the base.  It is a little darker than a pale malt.  In some respects, its a version of light munich malt.  I like the Pauls Mild malt, but you may not be able to find it.  As workable substitute, I suggest pale malt with a decent charge of munich malt to serve as the base malt component in the beer, say a third of the base malt bill. 

The 19 IBU bittering would probably be quite low in a 1.048 beer, but that is the level I aim for in my 1.038 beer.  I like EKG for all hopping, but the Warrior should be relatively flavorless when used at 60 min.  For yeast, I recommend a low attenuating yeast.  I really like Wyeast 1338, but they dropped it from regular production.  The Chico yeast may be a bit too attenuative and may eat up too much of the sweetness that you want to retain in the final product.  The single step, 154F mash temp should be good for reducing attenuation a bit.

Mild should be a great introductory beer to the Budmillors crowd. 
« Last Edit: August 05, 2013, 08:15:43 AM by mabrungard »
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook for occasional discussions on brewing water and Bru'n Water
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brun-Water/464551136933908

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1700
  • Da mihi sis cerevisiam.
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2013, 12:54:48 PM »
My first tries at a mild were too watery - so I listened to others and kicked up the mash temp to 156 and it gave them more body/made them less fermentable.  The improvement was quite noticeable...I also like the chocolate malt, but it does add a roastiness, which is not exactly to style, I believe.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline bboy9000

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
  • KCMO
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2013, 01:06:32 PM »
...I also like the chocolate malt, but it does add a roastiness, which is not exactly to style, I believe.

Some roastiness is acceptable, according to the BJCP Guidelines.  The only commercial example I'm familiar with is Cain's Dark Mild and I didn't get much roastiness from it.

I recently brewed Jamil's Southern English Brown (not a mild but close) which is more sweet than roasty.  The pale chocolate was a nice touch.  Regular chocolate probably would have been too much.
Brian
mobrewer

Offline In The Sand

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2013, 05:04:08 AM »
Ok, I've revised my recipe just a bit and changed it to a Northern English Brown Ale.  Let me know what you think.  I've also upped the mash temp a bit to make it more dextrinous since chico is so attenuative.  Let me know what you all think.  Is this going to be a good balanced brown?

Style: Northern English Brown Ale
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (35.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Batch Size: 10.00 gal     
Boil Size: 12.00 gal
Estimated OG: 1.047 SG
Estimated Color: 17.6 SRM
Estimated IBU: 26.0 IBU
Brewhouse Efficiency: 72.00 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amount        Item                                      Type         % or IBU     
15.00 lb      Standard 2-Row (2.0 SRM)                  Grain        82.19 %       
2.00 lb       Amber Malt (22.0 SRM)                     Grain        10.96 %       
0.75 lb       Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM)                Grain        4.11 %       
0.50 lb       Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM)     Grain        2.74 %       
2.00 oz       Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %]  (60 min)    Hops         18.9 IBU     
1.50 oz       Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %]  (15 min)    Hops         7.0 IBU       
0.50 oz       Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %]  (0 min)     Hops          -           
2.00 items    Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 10.0 min)          Misc                       
2 Pkgs        American Ale Yeast (Fermentis #US-05)     Yeast-Ale                 


Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Medium Body, Batch Sparge
Total Grain Weight: 18.25 lb
----------------------------
Single Infusion, Medium Body, Batch Sparge
Step Time     Name               Description                         Step Temp     
75 min        Mash In            Add 8.21 gal of water at 164.5 F    156.0 F       
Trey W.

Online hopfenundmalz

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6179
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2013, 06:02:28 AM »
There are milds in England in the 1.050+ range.

Sarah Hughes is one. I had another at Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem in Nottingham, too lazy to look it up.

Edit - looked it up,Hardy and Hanson's Cursed Galleon. 5.5% ABV.
http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/hardys-hansons-cursed-galleon/38673/
« Last Edit: August 05, 2013, 09:46:23 AM by hopfenundmalz »
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild, AHA Member, BJCP Certified
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline brewin2me

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2013, 07:14:27 AM »
You may want to back off on the Amber a bit as well. Its a fairly strong malt and with that much you may end up closer to a porter than a brown. Maybe a .5 lbs would be noticeable, but not overpowering.

Offline kmccaf

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
  • Kyle (Champaign, Hensley Township, Il)
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2013, 07:30:34 AM »
You may want to back off on the Amber a bit as well. Its a fairly strong malt and with that much you may end up closer to a porter than a brown. Maybe a .5 lbs would be noticeable, but not overpowering.

I agree that it is a strong malt. However, I used 10% in a beer once and quite liked it. YMMV.
Kyle M.

Offline vista

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 118
  • Orange, CT
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2013, 08:48:21 AM »
Have you tried s-05 with English hops, specificaly ekg? I personally do not like how they play together. If you have tried it and like it then go for it.
Take it easy...

Offline bboy9000

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 398
  • KCMO
    • View Profile
Re: Mild Brown Ale
« Reply #11 on: August 05, 2013, 09:02:46 AM »
As stated earlier, you may want to consider a British ale yeast like S-04.  Other than that it looks good.
Brian
mobrewer