Author Topic: NEIPA Help  (Read 433 times)

Offline monkeymullins

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NEIPA Help
« on: August 20, 2018, 08:32:36 AM »
Hi guys I’m after some hoping advice for my first NEIPA. I have 225g of African promise I want to use and this is what Iv come up with but would like some advice off you NEIPA pros please...


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Offline monkeymullins

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2018, 08:34:34 AM »
It’s a 23L batch
5.5abv
OG 1.056
FG 1.014
IBUs 49.2
EBC 9.2


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Offline RC

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2018, 04:52:48 PM »
I like my NEIPAs hazy as hell and seriously hoppy and juicy. And I make a pretty darn good one. My suggestions to achieve this (YMMV of course):

Malt: Bump up the haze-forming, higher-protein malts to about 40% of the grist. My go-to grain bill for my hazies is simply 60%:40% pale malt:wheat malt. If I'm feeling spunky I'll replace ~5% of the pale malt with vienna. (I've never needed rice hulls, even when I brew wheat beers with 60% wheat malt.)

Hops: If you're able to partially chill the wort, consider steeping the 100g charge of kettle hops after chilling the wort to ~170, rather than steeping right at flameout. You'll get a little more hop punch from this. Bitter to about 20-25 BUs with a single, simple 60-min addition. I've always gotten a lot of bitterness from dry-hopping so I go with a fairly low BU level on the hot side to compensate. And I go relatively big on the dry hopping. Your dry hop rate for both charges combined is only about 1 lb/bbl. I never go below 3 lb/bbl when I dry hop my IPAs. So consider tripling your dry hop charge. You may not have enough African promise for this, but on the hot side the varietal is less important, so you could use something else. I always do a single dry hop charge. I have found that adding at 3 days and then more at 7 days does not make a bit of difference compared to adding the combined amount all at once for a 3-day stand.

Some of this might seem contrary to the "conventional wisdom" for brewing NEIPAs, e.g. bittering only with a flameout charge, dry-hopping while primary is active, "biotransformation," multiple dry hop additions, yada yada yada. I have tried all these magical NEIPA-centric processes and I am skeptical of all of them. I have found that none of them make a better NEIPA compared to when I use simpler, more established brewing processes.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2018, 10:12:54 PM by RC »

Offline kovalski1488

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2018, 06:52:38 PM »
It’s a 23L batch
5.5abv
OG 1.056
FG 1.014
IBUs 49.2
EBC 9.2


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This batch seems very good and tasty, but s-04 yeasts are crap for Neipas I think. For example the Lallemand New England or some WhiteLab's strains will give you more turbidity and opalescence in final product. As well as the aromatic profile of these yeasts more tropical and fruity, consequently - more interesting. Next time try one of these, if there is a desire and opportunity.

it's just a tip from a dude who living on the other side of the world and trying to make a good and cool neipa. :)

So have a nice day (or night? in my own city night is coming tho...) and good luck in your experiment.

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Offline bob.wilson77

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2018, 10:47:18 AM »
Definitely up the wheat to 40 percent. Skip the 5 min boil hop. Lower the kettle temp to 170°F and I would do double the amounts of the dry hops for each dry hop addition.

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Offline monkeymullins

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2018, 02:14:11 PM »
So no boil Hop at all your saying and go 125g hopstand/whirlpool for 20mins


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Offline bob.wilson77

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2018, 02:21:44 PM »
125g is good, but I would only steep for ten minutes.

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Offline mabrungard

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2018, 02:22:23 PM »
Agree that S-04 is probably not the yeast for this style. Another yeast category to consider is the Kviek yeasts since they tend to be fruity.
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Offline Uvolnit

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2018, 01:06:21 AM »
I just tried my first NEIPA brew and it didn't turn out anywhere expected.  Definitely need to change the water profile, namely chloride and sulfate.  I also plan on not using any boil hops.  I put .5 oz at 60 mins and 3 oz at flameout which I think made too much IBU.

For reference:
https://beerandbrewing.com/weldwerks-brewing-co-juicy-bits-new-england-style-ipa/

Offline bob.wilson77

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2018, 03:19:57 AM »
You can go London Ale 3 also for yeast.

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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: NEIPA Help
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2018, 02:57:30 PM »
You can go London Ale 3 also for yeast.

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I like London Ale 3 in general but it's definitely my go-to yeast for hazy beers.

The water profile is the tricky part of this style. I follow a profile posted by somebody a few years ago:

Ca = 96
Mg = 12
Na = 28
Sulfate = 67
Chloride = 135
Bicarbonate = 128
pH: 5.45

If you can nail the water profile the rest of the beer isn't particularly complicated. Most of the NEIPAs exist in a small range of recipe differences. Poor flocculating yeast, pale malt plus a lot of oats/wheat/wheat malt/dextrin malt, very little boil hops and an enormous amount of post-boil and dry hopping. You can play around with small changes like picking different pale malts and adding different combinations and timings of post-boil hops but that will get you to a serviceable NEIPA. From there you can work on perfecting your personal recipe.
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