Author Topic: BIAB  (Read 2735 times)

Offline glitterbug

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2010, 07:40:03 AM »
What bag or material is being used?  Its amazing how the wheels of progress turn so slowly sometimes, a year or two ago the Aussie's did this and everybody sorta scoffed at it.  They were also doing grain conditioning long before it was considered by homebrewers in the US.  I think when they first started mentioning BIAB, a guy had a site showing the bag he used and it was some sort of curtain material like you would find in the sewing or craft department stores and they sewed their own bags?  Is there something else out there available, even large bags made of very fine woven material?  Perhaps the large fine mesh bags offered on some of the sites like NB are fine and strong enough.

This is a really good thread for biab info: http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4650

I got my fabric at a fabric store, it is called "swiss voile" or similar for about $10.

In addition to biab, the Australians have also pioneered the "no chill" method. You basically transfer the wort into a "jerry can" or other suitable container right after the boil without chilling. You would let wort cool overnight and pitch the next day. Some of them even store the wort and pitch several weeks or months later.

I think that biab + nochill would really save time and would greatly reduce the equipment required to move to AG. Most of the "potential problems" have already been debunked on various forums and many of the naysayers have no real experience with these "new" methods.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 07:57:03 AM by glitterbug »
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Offline denny

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2010, 08:49:13 AM »
Denny, do you want to borrow my engine hoist?  ;D

Thanks anyway, David, but I think I'll just do a small batch...like maybe a 16 oz. batch!  ;)
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Re: BIAB
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2010, 12:13:17 PM »
Denny, do you want to borrow my engine hoist?  ;D

Thanks anyway, David, but I think I'll just do a small batch...like maybe a 16 oz. batch!  ;)

OK but you'll never make into the Tim the Toolman Taylor Club like that.  :-\

Offline dean

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2010, 04:15:21 PM »
What bag or material is being used?  Its amazing how the wheels of progress turn so slowly sometimes, a year or two ago the Aussie's did this and everybody sorta scoffed at it.  They were also doing grain conditioning long before it was considered by homebrewers in the US.  I think when they first started mentioning BIAB, a guy had a site showing the bag he used and it was some sort of curtain material like you would find in the sewing or craft department stores and they sewed their own bags?  Is there something else out there available, even large bags made of very fine woven material?  Perhaps the large fine mesh bags offered on some of the sites like NB are fine and strong enough.

This is a really good thread for biab info: http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4650

I got my fabric at a fabric store, it is called "swiss voile" or similar for about $10.

In addition to biab, the Australians have also pioneered the "no chill" method. You basically transfer the wort into a "jerry can" or other suitable container right after the boil without chilling. You would let wort cool overnight and pitch the next day. Some of them even store the wort and pitch several weeks or months later.

I think that biab + nochill would really save time and would greatly reduce the equipment required to move to AG. Most of the "potential problems" have already been debunked on various forums and many of the naysayers have no real experience with these "new" methods.

I've been experimenting with the no-chill and it seems to work fine for me, you can even see the break material at the bottom.  I don't transfer from the BK... just leave it there to chill overnight.  Is the swiss voile priced at $10 per yard or is that to make the entire bag?

Offline euge

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2010, 10:43:27 PM »
dean-

Doesn't that defeat the purpose leaving it there in the BK? My understanding is that the scalding wort sanitizes the fermenter/container first. I've wondered about if this actually matters. Confidence in one's sanitation and then a huge pitch of yeast and it would be OK?

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline dean

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2010, 05:59:25 AM »
I just sanitize my carboys before I transfer, so its the same ending.  But you gave me an idea, maybe my BK could double up as a fermenter as well.  I've got enough kegs where it shouldn't be all that difficult to try it.   Thanks for the idea!  :)

Offline denny

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2010, 08:25:52 AM »
I just sanitize my carboys before I transfer, so its the same ending.  But you gave me an idea, maybe my BK could double up as a fermenter as well.  I've got enough kegs where it shouldn't be all that difficult to try it.   Thanks for the idea!  :)

someone (maybe Jeff Renner?) wrote in HBD years ago about using the BK as a fermenter and just pitching yeast right into it.
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Offline monk

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2010, 12:02:31 PM »
Question about the no-chill method:

If I were to immediately dump my wort into the fermenting bucket and leave to chill overnight, wouldn't the chilling wort suck in air that might contaminate? 

I'm sure someone else has already thought of this, but I'm curious as to how they solve the problem, or whether it's a problem.

monk

Offline hokerer

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2010, 01:20:46 PM »
Question about the no-chill method:

If I were to immediately dump my wort into the fermenting bucket and leave to chill overnight, wouldn't the chilling wort suck in air that might contaminate? 

I'm sure someone else has already thought of this, but I'm curious as to how they solve the problem, or whether it's a problem.

monk

If I remember correctly, when they do BIAB, they dump the hot wort into a "jerrycan".  It's basically a container that they can fill to the very top so there is no air left and then they put screw on the lid that makes a tight seal.  That way no air comes in as it cools. 

Once it's cool, they can then transfer it to the fermenter.
Joe

Offline glitterbug

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Re: BIAB
« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2010, 03:18:09 PM »
Question about the no-chill method:

If I were to immediately dump my wort into the fermenting bucket and leave to chill overnight, wouldn't the chilling wort suck in air that might contaminate? 

I'm sure someone else has already thought of this, but I'm curious as to how they solve the problem, or whether it's a problem.

monk

Don't dump boiling wort into the plastic fermenting bucket. I believe it will warp it. You will want to use a "jerry can" as hokerer suggested or a winpack container from US plastics. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/using-winpak-fermenter-160044/

I'm still not convinced that HDPE is safe at high temps. I think the FDA recommends 180f or below.

I have been looking for info on nochilling in a corny and most people seem to think hitting it with some co2 to maintain the seal will keep the bugs out. Unfortunately, I don't keg so I don't have a co2 source. I will probably try without it and see how it works soon.
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