Author Topic: Storing beer in a corny  (Read 3459 times)

Online gmac

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2021
  • London, Ontario
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2013, 06:12:47 PM »
Sorry. I will be force carbing. So I keg it now, I put it in the keezer and get it to serving temp in December, andd then carb?

Actually, you can carb it now of you want to, and you can even carb it warm.  I do that 99% of the time.
What do you do the other 1 %? 

Offline jeffy

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2441
  • Tampa, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2013, 08:18:32 PM »
If you won't be serving it until winter and you won't be refrigerating the keg, then it would make sense to prime it with some sugar to cut down on oxidation.  Add sugar and enough pressure to seal the keg and check it occasionally for carbonation.  The fermentation will scavenge the O2 while it carbonates.

I could be wrong, but do you really need to add sugar to cut down on oxidation.  If you rack to the keg then purge w/ CO2 then there shouldn't be any worries regarding oxidation right?  I just put a winter warmer in a keg to age for the first time and did it this way w/out any sugar.  I'll put it in the fridge and force carb in December.

It's because it is hard to get all the O2 out of the keg, but the yeast eating the sugar will consume it.  Ever notice that bottle-conditioned beers stay fresh longer than counter-pressure filled bottles?  Even though I don't ever leave kegs sitting around for any long periods of time, I thought this was a good idea to circumvent staling.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline mugwort

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 96
  • Baby T Aleworks
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2013, 08:44:53 PM »
If you won't be serving it until winter and you won't be refrigerating the keg, then it would make sense to prime it with some sugar to cut down on oxidation.  Add sugar and enough pressure to seal the keg and check it occasionally for carbonation.  The fermentation will scavenge the O2 while it carbonates.

I could be wrong, but do you really need to add sugar to cut down on oxidation.  If you rack to the keg then purge w/ CO2 then there shouldn't be any worries regarding oxidation right?  I just put a winter warmer in a keg to age for the first time and did it this way w/out any sugar.  I'll put it in the fridge and force carb in December.

It's because it is hard to get all the O2 out of the keg, but the yeast eating the sugar will consume it.  Ever notice that bottle-conditioned beers stay fresh longer than counter-pressure filled bottles?  Even though I don't ever leave kegs sitting around for any long periods of time, I thought this was a good idea to circumvent staling.

Amen to refermentation for long-lived brews!
Baby T Aleworks | 100% Organic Abode-Crafted Ales | San Gabriel, CA | On tap...
Hellhound (stout on pasillas) 9% * Heatstroke Belgian IPA 7.5% * Quado 3 Belgian Dark Strong 10% * Browneyes Belgian Porter (on cacao and coffee nibs) 6.5% * Monkey's Uncle V Witbier 5% * Belgian Blonde with goji berries 7% * Heatstroke IPA 7.5% * Stone Age Belgian Stout 9.5% * Ziggurat Dark Sour 10%

Online hopfenundmalz

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4530
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2013, 06:08:52 AM »
When one gets really geeky about minimizing O2, one can fill a keg with sanitizer solution so that all the O2 is displaced. Then push the sanitizer out with CO2, so that you have a keg full of CO2. Then one can rack into the keg via the liquid out post. Also make sure the racking cane and tubing is full of beer, not air when you start, and that can be done by hooking up to a second empty keg until beer is flowing.

Tedious, but effective.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild, AHA Member, BJCP Certified
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11654
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #19 on: August 18, 2013, 09:12:17 AM »
Sorry. I will be force carbing. So I keg it now, I put it in the keezer and get it to serving temp in December, andd then carb?

Actually, you can carb it now of you want to, and you can even carb it warm.  I do that 99% of the time.
What do you do the other 1 %?

I chill it before I take it out and carb it.  Due to space limitation, I don't have CO2 run into my serving fridge.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline mugwort

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 96
  • Baby T Aleworks
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #20 on: August 18, 2013, 01:04:15 PM »
Sorry. I will be force carbing. So I keg it now, I put it in the keezer and get it to serving temp in December, andd then carb?

Actually, you can carb it now of you want to, and you can even carb it warm.  I do that 99% of the time.
What do you do the other 1 %?

I chill it before I take it out and carb it.  Due to space limitation, I don't have CO2 run into my serving fridge.

I for one was concerned that the 1% were getting too much special treatment.
Baby T Aleworks | 100% Organic Abode-Crafted Ales | San Gabriel, CA | On tap...
Hellhound (stout on pasillas) 9% * Heatstroke Belgian IPA 7.5% * Quado 3 Belgian Dark Strong 10% * Browneyes Belgian Porter (on cacao and coffee nibs) 6.5% * Monkey's Uncle V Witbier 5% * Belgian Blonde with goji berries 7% * Heatstroke IPA 7.5% * Stone Age Belgian Stout 9.5% * Ziggurat Dark Sour 10%

Offline fmader

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 845
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2013, 09:14:57 AM »
So is 10 psi good to store a beer in a corny at 65ish degrees? Or should I go higher?
Frank

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11654
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2013, 09:16:02 AM »
So is 10 psi good to store a beer in a corny at 65ish degrees? Or should I go higher?

Doesn't really matter.  Just be sure the lid is sealed, and 10 psi should do that.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Online yso191

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 632
  • Yakima, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2013, 09:36:33 AM »
So is 10 psi good to store a beer in a corny at 65ish degrees? Or should I go higher?

That will work for a while.  Then the beer will absorb the CO2 and the head pressure will equalize.  It probably isn't an issue unless you're OCD like me.  I want to keep constant positive pressure on the inside to make sure the keg stays sealed.  Which means that I come along with my CO2 and give it a 15-20 lb. shot once a day.  That way it is carbonating while it is just sitting.  And yes, if I don't need the CO2 elsewhere, I just leave it hooked up at the pressure it needs to carb to the right level.
Steve

Offline Joe Sr.

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2324
  • Chicago - NORTH SIDE
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2013, 03:58:04 PM »
So is 10 psi good to store a beer in a corny at 65ish degrees? Or should I go higher?

Doesn't really matter.  Just be sure the lid is sealed, and 10 psi should do that.

I've always thought you needed more than 10 psi to seat the lid well.  But I could be wrong.

If I'm storing kegs I hit them at about 30 psi to seat the lid.  Of course, if the seal is bad they still leak at whatever pressure you hit them with...
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Online HoosierBrew

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2228
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2013, 04:21:04 PM »
I read an article somewhere that said that a steady pressure of ~ 9 psi is enough to keep the lid seated, and that less would obviously let the beer go flat.  I wish I could remember who wrote it.  As said, a bad /old seal
wouldn't seal well regardless.
Jon H.

Offline fmader

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 845
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2013, 04:34:10 PM »
Ok, good to know guys. I bought all new gasket sets for my cornies. I replaced them all on this one. I plan on kegging it Monday. I'll just hit with 20+ish psi. Sorry if these questions seem silly. I'm totally new to the kegging game. This probably will never be an issue in the future. My keezer isn't built yet, although I have everything but the lumber. Once it's built, kegs will just go in and tapped.
Frank

Online HoosierBrew

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2228
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2013, 04:39:58 PM »
Not silly at all Frank.  It's a very different process from bottling. You'll be glad you made the jump !
Jon H.

Offline fmader

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 845
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2013, 04:49:29 PM »
Not silly at all Frank.  It's a very different process from bottling. You'll be glad you made the jump !

I basically did it to have my own beer on tap at my wedding next May. So we're going to have it up and running for our Christmas party with the Pumpkin Saison (Zymurgy recipe), a spruce ale, a winter warmer of sort, and my Red-Nosed IPA. I actually had the IPA on tap last Christmas in my 1/8 sanke keg.
Frank

Online HoosierBrew

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2228
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Storing beer in a corny
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2013, 04:52:25 PM »
Sounds like a winner.  It's fun to have more than one on tap.
Jon H.