Author Topic: First RIS - not quite done  (Read 1820 times)

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2013, 09:08:54 AM »
Do nothing but be patient.  That's a big beer, and 19 days is no big deal for it.  Wait at least another week, maybe two, and then see where it's at.  I've screwed up more beer by trying to save them than I've actually saved.
And for the record - I do what Denny says.
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Offline scott

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2013, 06:08:15 AM »
So two weeks later, the gravity has not changed.  After 30 days, it is at 1.042, unchanged since day 19.  ABV is 11%.  The beer tastes good, but I know I do not have a refined pallet.

So since I'm off the expected final gravity by about 11 points, do I bottle now or is there still a risk of bottle bombs/ over carbonation?


Recap:
Fermenting a RIS.  The OG was 1.110 (hydrometer).  The recipe called for a FG of 1.031.  I'm using WLP028 (Edinburgh Scottish Ale).  It was from a previous 5 gallon batch and was half the yeast cake.  Only one day passed from harvesting the yeast and starting this beer.  Fermented at 69°F, raised to 71°F after the first week.

Recipe:
Fermentables:
12.0 lb LME
8 oz Wheat LME
17 oz Crystal Malt 80 °L
8 oz Black Patent Malt
8 oz Chocolate Malt
8 oz Victory Malt
7 oz Roasted Barley
6 oz Malto Dextrin

Hops:
1 oz Challenger (6.9% aa) (60 min)
1 oz U.K. Northern Brewer (16 HBU with Challenger) (9.4% aa) (60 min)
1.3 oz East Kent Goldings (7.5 HBU)(5.8% aa) (60 min)
1.5 oz Fuggles (4.5% aa) (10 min)
Scott

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2013, 06:34:09 AM »
With that much LME you may be done.  Some extracts have lots of unfermentables in them.

I use the lightest possible DME (Breiss Pilsen) and have found it to be highly fermentable, but all extracts are different.

What sort of extract did you use?  Was it light or dark?

Regardless, your probably done.  I did a big beer like that with tons of extract once and it finished high, even with the Pilsen DME.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2013, 07:00:07 AM »
+1.  Some extracts are more fermentable than others.  IIRC Briess is the most fermentable of the extracts. Add crystal and maltodextrin to the extract and I bet you're done.
Jon H.

Offline scott

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #19 on: September 02, 2013, 07:55:02 AM »
I believe I used Briess LME.  But I'm beginning to believe that it may be done. 

How much of an issue is 11 points for bottle bombs?
Scott

Offline denny

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2013, 08:40:10 AM »
How much of an issue is 11 points for bottle bombs?

None at all of the fermentation is done due to the wort being unfermentable.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2013, 09:37:22 AM »
With a huge amount of LME, plus maltodextrin which is unfermentable, it's done.  You are safe to go ahead and bottle.  Whoever designed the recipe is... of old-school intellect.  I'm tired of seeing extract recipes with maltodextrin.  We know better now in the 21st century.  Extract has variable fermentability.  Next time try another brand of extract.  Or, start doing partial mash at 148 F for an hour to improve fermentability AND flavor.  Cheers.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2013, 09:39:11 AM by dmtaylor »
Dave

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Offline scott

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2013, 02:56:40 PM »
This recipe actually called more more maltodextrin.  I modified it by cutting it way down.  I typically modify extract recipes to do a partial mash with a concentrated boil.  But decided to follow the recipe more closely this time.  With several exceptions - I used all LME instead of all DME. 

Why do you NOT use maltodextrin?  Is it just better to do a partial mash at a lower temp, like 148 F?
Scott

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: First RIS - not quite done
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2013, 03:30:41 PM »
This recipe actually called more more maltodextrin.  I modified it by cutting it way down.  I typically modify extract recipes to do a partial mash with a concentrated boil.  But decided to follow the recipe more closely this time.  With several exceptions - I used all LME instead of all DME. 

Why do you NOT use maltodextrin?  Is it just better to do a partial mash at a lower temp, like 148 F?

One of the main drawbacks of using a large % of extract is attenuating anywhere near where you would by using all grain.  Most any extracts contain crystal/dextrine malts which give your beer body, but are unfermentable. 
 Maltodextrin is an unfermentable as well  - it can be used to  boost body and mouthfeel as well.  So you don't need it, and it comes with a price - being unfermentable, it drives your final gravity higher. SO a high % of LME + Crystal + maltodextrin all in the same beer is a guarantee of a high final gravity. Dave's suggestion of a partial mash @ 148F is a good one - it would help to make your wort a good bit more fermentable when used with LME.
  I did exactly one partial mash batch before realizing that I could have just made an all-grain batch.  So be prepared for that !  Good luck.
Jon H.