Author Topic: dry yeast question  (Read 3775 times)

Offline sparkleberry

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 278
    • View Profile
dry yeast question
« on: August 24, 2013, 07:01:11 PM »
so i brewed two days ago. ground water wouldn't get me to pitching temps, which is fine as i planned on letting wort chill the rest of the way in the ferm chamber anyway. and i did.

i rehydrated yeast yesterday and nothing was happening after 24 hours+.

today i sprinkled another pack of us05 into the wort and have very good things going on now.

i rehydrated the yeast at 105. followed reliable directions for it and still had nothing. it's an american wheat similar to gumballhead(which i've never actually had). within a few hours of pitching dry yeast today, fermentation is taking off.

i guess my question is, did i do the right thing? i've never rehydrated yeast before. i usually use wyeast 1056 and make a starter, but was a little confused as to why fermentation didn't take off with the rehydrated us05. brew day was off a little as i haven't brewed in a while but process was still pretty solid.

cheers and thanks.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2013, 07:04:50 PM by sparkleberry »
cheers.

rpl
apertureales

Online HoosierBrew

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2269
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2013, 07:22:54 PM »
I used to rehydrate per the instructions, but i have just sprinkled on top for years and won't go back.  It's easy when rehydrating to  1/ go a little warm and kill some or all of the yeast   or  2/ to add another sanitation risk.  I don't know how accurate your thermometer is, but it sounds like either a bad/old packet of yeast, or the actual temp you rehydrated at was a little high and you killed the yeast, especially since the packet of dry kicked fermentation right off. Use it dry, man.
Jon H.

Online erockrph

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2435
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • Critical Tastings
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2013, 07:46:56 PM »
I used to rehydrate per the instructions, but i have just sprinkled on top for years and won't go back.  It's easy when rehydrating to  1/ go a little warm and kill some or all of the yeast   or  2/ to add another sanitation risk.  I don't know how accurate your thermometer is, but it sounds like either a bad/old packet of yeast, or the actual temp you rehydrated at was a little high and you killed the yeast, especially since the packet of dry kicked fermentation right off. Use it dry, man.

+1 - I've tried it both ways and didn't notice an appreciable difference, so I just sprinkle it on dry.

105 does seem like a high temp for rehydrating. The Fermentis website recommends 80F water if you choose to rehydrate. It could be that either your water outright killed the yeast from being too hot, or you ended up shocking the rehydrated yeast by taking them from 100+ degree water and pitching it into much cooler wort.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *****
  • Posts: 6310
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • View Profile
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2013, 04:09:16 AM »
I never rehydrate. For high gravity beers I add extra yeast (as much as 50% more). Always have fermentation within 24 hours and narry a hitch. Just no need to rehydrate US-05 in my experience. None. Nada. Zilch. Don't let anyone tell you differently.
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline kgs

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 754
  • San Francisco, CA
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2013, 07:32:44 AM »
I went back and forth for years, but several batches ago had a contaminated batch (my 2nd in over 4 years of brewing, the first happened on my 2nd batch) and my process is otherwise so good I'm going back to sprinkling. I don't see any difference in lift-off and if I were worried about it one bit I'd sprinkle another half-packet. Make sure you have fresh yeast and keep it in the fridge until brewday.

Without knowing your temps, I concur you may have killed your yeast. The persnickety process of ensuring the rehydration water was within the right range is probably where I introduced contamination.
K.G. Schneider
AHA Member

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11688
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2013, 08:35:59 AM »
I'm another one who has tried both ways and settled on no rehydration.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline breweite

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 47
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2013, 09:10:14 AM »
I just wanted to be clear, as I'm switching to more and more dry yeast for $ reasons. Just "sprinkle" and walk away?  I've sometimes sprinkled and then shook or used my drill to give it a good swirl.  Is this a bad idea?
Cheers from Austin, Tejas!

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11688
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2013, 09:21:20 AM »
It's unlikely to be harmful, but it won't help either.  Just sprinkle and walk away is all that's necessary.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline sparkleberry

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 278
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2013, 09:25:32 AM »
thanks everyone.
cheers.

rpl
apertureales

Online Steve in TX

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 811
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2013, 09:40:08 AM »
I don't mind rehydrating my dry yeast. I simply boil a small amount of water in a flask covered with foil and let cool while brewing. If I ever use dry yeast as a backup plan, I pitch right on top the wort.

Offline repo

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 326
  • San Diego CA
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2013, 10:04:23 AM »
so i brewed two days ago. ground water wouldn't get me to pitching temps, which is fine as i planned on letting wort chill the rest of the way in the ferm chamber anyway. and i did.

i rehydrated yeast yesterday and nothing was happening after 24 hours+.

today i sprinkled another pack of us05 into the wort and have very good things going on now.

i rehydrated the yeast at 105. followed reliable directions for it and still had nothing. it's an american wheat similar to gumballhead(which i've never actually had). within a few hours of pitching dry yeast today, fermentation is taking off.

i guess my question is, did i do the right thing? i've never rehydrated yeast before. i usually use wyeast 1056 and make a starter, but was a little confused as to why fermentation didn't take off with the rehydrated us05. brew day was off a little as i haven't brewed in a while but process was still pretty solid.

cheers and thanks.

I have done both and not found any discernible difference. I haven't rehydrated in years, but when I did it was as per Fermentis 80 +/- 6 degrees.  I have also never had dry yeast take of within a few hours, always several hours and later. I think your original pitch was starting to work.

I have also tried the starter vs straight vial and found no discernible difference. There are lots of situations where making a starter is not necessary, just as there are lots of situations where making one is necessary. 


Offline narcout

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 468
  • Los Angeles, CA
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2013, 09:40:48 PM »
I doubt temperature was your issue, unless your thermometer is not accurate.

Chris White and/or Jamil (not sure who wrote the section on working with dry yeast in Yeast) recommend rehydrating at 105 degrees.  I've rehydrated many a packet of US-05 at that temperature and never had a problem with it.

Perhaps rehydrating isn't necessary, but it's never killed my yeast.

Online mtnrockhopper

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2897
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2013, 08:49:01 AM »
I just wanted to be clear, as I'm switching to more and more dry yeast for $ reasons. Just "sprinkle" and walk away?  I've sometimes sprinkled and then shook or used my drill to give it a good swirl.  Is this a bad idea?
I think some of the idea behind sprinkling is to allow the cells to more slowly rehydrate as they sit on top. Immediately stirring may cause the cells to fill with sugary wort faster. I can't say it's bad, but maybe it's not good.
Jimmy K

Delmarva United Homebrewers - President by inverse coup when the old president ousted himself.
AHA Member since 2006
BJCP: B0958

Offline aveteto01

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 10
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2013, 09:12:42 AM »
I'm another one who has tried both ways and settled on no rehydration.

So, Rehydrated < Dry

But is a yeast starter better than just sprinkling the dry yeast in? Or is that really just to boost pitching rate for higher OG beers?


Offline In The Sand

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 397
    • View Profile
Re: dry yeast question
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2013, 09:44:27 AM »

I just wanted to be clear, as I'm switching to more and more dry yeast for $ reasons. Just "sprinkle" and walk away?  I've sometimes sprinkled and then shook or used my drill to give it a good swirl.  Is this a bad idea?
I think some of the idea behind sprinkling is to allow the cells to more slowly rehydrate as they sit on top. Immediately stirring may cause the cells to fill with sugary wort faster. I can't say it's bad, but maybe it's not good.

I used to sprinkle and walk away, but since I got my Blichmann plate chiller I can chill to pitching temps right away. So I fill the carboy half way then pitch the dry yeast as I fill the rest of the way. Still seeing attenuation as expected and no ill effects in the flavor department. YMMV
Trey W.