Author Topic: Cubic inches wood per 5 gallons of beer  (Read 1566 times)

Offline majorvices

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Re: Cubic inches wood per 5 gallons of beer
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2013, 04:21:25 AM »
Don't lose any sleep over getting the right surface area to 'mimic barrel character'. Barrel aging is much more than oak flavor.

Just throw in 1/4 oz at a time and see what happens.

Totally agree, I do a lot of barrel aging. I just want to gauge via that experience. I'm actually looking for a mild wood character. And this is cherry wood I have toasted myself. Some of it charred.

The bags said 180 cu in and I thought I remembered from the NHC presentation this past summer in Phil that its best to gauge by cu in not weight.

Anyway, thanks for all the suggestions.
Keith Y.
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Re: Cubic inches wood per 5 gallons of beer
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2013, 08:26:41 AM »
I flavor vodka on medium toasted cherrywood chunks that I buy at the Home Depot in the barbecuing section.   I toast the wood myself in my kitchen oven.  The vodka takes on a beautiful reddish-pink hue, and picks up a praline-like flavor, only without the sweetness.  Two weeks on the toasted cherrywood does the trick.  It is VERY nice on the rocks.
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Re: Cubic inches wood per 5 gallons of beer
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2013, 09:10:30 AM »
I flavor vodka on medium toasted cherrywood chunks that I buy at the Home Depot in the barbecuing section.   I toast the wood myself in my kitchen oven.  The vodka takes on a beautiful reddish-pink hue, and picks up a praline-like flavor, only without the sweetness.  Two weeks on the toasted cherrywood does the trick.  It is VERY nice on the rocks.

Nice! This is the third year I have done this Belgian strong on cherry wood. Definitely changes the color. Interesting how the cherry flavor comes through from the wood.

But I have gotten very subtle actual wood flavor and really want to dial this in.
Keith Y.
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Re: Cubic inches wood per 5 gallons of beer
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2013, 12:33:20 PM »
In my experience, less toasting contributes more wood flavors with cherrywood.  I've tried untoasted wood to charred all the way through, and all levels of toast in between.  The untoasted is too woody for my taste in vodka, but it might be what you're looking for in your beer.

The medium-dark toast I like for flavoring my vodka has toasted wood outside with an untoasted core.  The combination of the various levels of toasting combine to produce the complex praline-like flavor (think pecans and carmelized sugar, but not sweet).

FWIW the completely charred all the way through chunks contribute a charcoal-like flavor that hints of bourbon.  Very one-note-song by itself, but intersting when combined with medium toasted chunks.

Lots of possibilties. 
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Re: Cubic inches wood per 5 gallons of beer
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2013, 03:46:06 AM »
In my experience, less toasting contributes more wood flavors with cherrywood.  I've tried untoasted wood to charred all the way through, and all levels of toast in between.  The untoasted is too woody for my taste in vodka, but it might be what you're looking for in your beer.

The medium-dark toast I like for flavoring my vodka has toasted wood outside with an untoasted core.  The combination of the various levels of toasting combine to produce the complex praline-like flavor (think pecans and carmelized sugar, but not sweet).

FWIW the completely charred all the way through chunks contribute a charcoal-like flavor that hints of bourbon.  Very one-note-song by itself, but intersting when combined with medium toasted chunks.

Lots of possibilties.

Cool. I may have to try this vodka thing. Not normally a vodka drinker but surely sounds interesting. Thanks for the feed back.
Keith Y.
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