Author Topic: Help me design a killer kegerator!  (Read 1144 times)

Offline gimmeales

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Help me design a killer kegerator!
« on: March 16, 2010, 11:59:48 AM »
Hey all,

I've been charged (well, I volunteered) for getting a workable kegerator system in my office.  The big challenge is that the new building we're in has a custom cabinet unit which had a beer dispensing system put in as an afterthought.  It currently houses two pony kegs and a flash chiller, which doesn't work for anything more than a single event - not long-term storage.  I'm wondering what options exist out there for converting this space into a properly refrigerated space.  What I'm looking at (without any cutting) is a box that is 41"H x 39.5"W x 31"D (all internal dimensions), but with a 'serving shelf' on the front that reduces the current opening to 22"H.  There is a possibility of cutting out the back of the cabinet to get another 8" of depth.  Will make more sense with some pics:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/rangerover/sets/72157623477773771/

I'm hoping for: 1.)  suggestions on refridgerators\chest freezers that may fit the space as-is (i.e. cheap 'n easy) and/or  2.)  possibilities for a custom job, even referrals to companies in the NW (Seattle) that do this type of work.  I'm guessing number 2 is the mostly viable option considering the odd-sized space, but I want the experts to take a look and chime-in.  I really want to get draft beer back in the office! (wouldn't you?)

cheers!

Offline MrNate

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Re: Help me design a killer kegerator!
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2010, 06:58:37 PM »
Gut a dorm fridge? The kind that has the freezer shelf, not the kind with the coils in the side. Find one where the whole freezer pulls straight out the back (after removing the panel), unbolt the entire cooling system, and pull the box off. Then install the guts in the cabinet with some foam board insulation.

Just a thought.
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