Author Topic: Apple pie ale  (Read 1473 times)

cornershot

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Apple pie ale
« on: September 24, 2013, 03:34:12 PM »
I really need some feedback on this one.  :)

10 gallon batch

8# 2 row
3# flaked barley
2# wheat malt
1# victory malt
1# crystal 60
1 oz magnum 60 minutes
1 tbsp each cinnamon and nutmeg last 10 minutes
1# brown sugar, last 10 minutes

Mash at 158, brew 6 gallons of wort and top up to 10 gallons with fresh pressed apple juice
1056, ferment at 67f



Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2013, 03:37:59 PM »
I don't know that you will get much in the way of flavor from the brown sugar. It looks like you are going for a pretty chewy beer so I might add a little molasses instead.

Why so many different grains? Do you have a reason for each?

That's ALOT of flaked barley.

I will say that I LOVE a nice 'black velvet' or 'snake bite' or whatever they call it in your neck of the woods when you float half a pint of stout on top of half a pint of cider.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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cornershot

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2013, 04:08:23 PM »
I don't know that you will get much in the way of flavor from the brown sugar. It looks like you are going for a pretty chewy beer so I might add a little molasses instead.

Why so many different grains? Do you have a reason for each?

That's ALOT of flaked barley.

I will say that I LOVE a nice 'black velvet' or 'snake bite' or whatever they call it in your neck of the woods when you float half a pint of stout on top of half a pint of cider.

I like the flaked barley for the additional body it gives a beer and I think it gives a creamy sweetness that I think would go well with a beer that's supposed to taste like a dessert.
The wheat and victory are to give it the crackery pie crust flavor.
The crystal 60 is for caramel sweetness. Because caramel and apples just go together.
All that mashed at 158f looks like it will be quite chewy but remember I will be adding about 40% highly fermentable apple juice.I don't want it to end up too thin.
My experience with molasses is that it gives beer a buttery flavor. Maybe that could be a good thing.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2013, 07:16:47 PM »
I get a "raw grain" flavor from large percentages of flaked barley. It's OK in stouts where you have a lot of roasted grain character to mask it, but I can definitely taste it in lighter beers. Maybe consider replacing some (or all) with oats?

If you want to get some brown sugar-like character in the finished beer, maybe consider a medium color Candi Syrup like D-45 or D-90. Or use a dark rum (Myers, Goslings, etc) to make a tincture for your spices. It won't be exactly the same as brown sugar, but I have a feeling it will show up in the finished beer better than brown sugar would.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Online garc_mall

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2013, 09:30:09 PM »
A guy in our club made this for NHC last year in Seattle. It was a favorite for pretty much everyone there, and so he shared the recipe.

Apple Pie Strong Scotch Ale
 
11 gal. batch
 
24 lbs.         Maris Otter
4 lbs            Crystal 40
4 lbs            Munich
2 lbs            Crystal 130
2 lbs            Wheat Malt
 
Mash @ 152 for 60 min.
Boil 90 min.
 
3 oz.            EK Goldings(5% Alpha)     60min
.5oz.            EK Goldings(5% Alpha)     15 min
 
Create a big starter with White Labs WLP028
 
OG    1.097
FG    1.018  Mine actually finished at 1.023
 
30 days Primary
60 days Secondary
 
The Strong Scotch Ale recipe is based on Phil Farrell's with the following added after the first 30 days in the secondary.  Then racked to a keg after an additional 30 days leaving the apple peel and spices behind.
 
Soak in 1 cup bourbon for a couple of days and add to secondary
-the peel of 8 large apples
-2 cinnamon sticks
-2 tsp. cassia chips
-4 cloves
-1 vanilla bean

That is certainly the best Apple Pie beer I have ever had, but I haven't made the recipe myself.
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2013, 03:26:30 AM »
I've made several paler beers with various percentages of flaked barley and I can assure you the flavor contribution is not creamy sweetness.  The only reason its welcome in a stout is that the graininess pairs well with the roast.  I find that flaked wheat provides a modest boost to body with a much lower taste impact. 
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cornershot

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2013, 04:03:43 AM »
Okay I'm second-guessing the flaked barley...and my palate! :) I thought the flaked barley might pair well with the spice. I've had Pumking recently and I could swear I tasted a heavy dose of flaked barley. And I liked that beer in spirit although it's a little over the top and in your face for me.
As for the brown sugar, consider it gone.
Garc_mall thanks for the recipe.

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2013, 05:51:15 AM »
If you use grocery store brown sugar, it's usually made by blending molasses and white sugar. Since the white sugar will just dry the beer out, and you don't want that, I'd use molasses. Don't use a lot though - the amount of molasses in a lb of brown sugar is pretty small - like a few tablespoons.
 
 
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2013, 07:09:38 AM »
I will second that a little molasses goes a long way.  I use 4 oz in a big stout and you can taste it.  It's not overpowering, but it's one of the first flavors you can pick out amongst the roast, the chocolate and the hops.
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cornershot

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2013, 04:26:50 PM »
I don't know that you will get much in the way of flavor from the brown sugar. It looks like you are going for a pretty chewy beer so I might add a little molasses instead.

Why so many different grains? Do you have a reason for each?

That's ALOT of flaked barley.

I will say that I LOVE a nice 'black velvet' or 'snake bite' or whatever they call it in your neck of the woods when you float half a pint of stout on top of half a pint of cider.

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I've decided to scrap this recipe and brew an Irish stout and press apples for cider while the stout's brewing. Then I can try that stout/cider drink which I've never heard of.
Maybe I'll try the apple pie ale recipe posted by garc_mall another time. It's really for my wife and she absolutely deserves it for her amazing patience with my turning half the house into a brewery. Just not this time. ;)

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2013, 04:56:11 PM »
I don't know that you will get much in the way of flavor from the brown sugar. It looks like you are going for a pretty chewy beer so I might add a little molasses instead.

Why so many different grains? Do you have a reason for each?

That's ALOT of flaked barley.

I will say that I LOVE a nice 'black velvet' or 'snake bite' or whatever they call it in your neck of the woods when you float half a pint of stout on top of half a pint of cider.

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I've decided to scrap this recipe and brew an Irish stout and press apples for cider while the stout's brewing. Then I can try that stout/cider drink which I've never heard of.
Maybe I'll try the apple pie ale recipe posted by garc_mall another time. It's really for my wife and she absolutely deserves it for her amazing patience with my turning half the house into a brewery. Just not this time. ;)
My wife's pretty equally patient with my brewing, so the cider I made today is for her as much as for me. She's pretty awesome.  Plus it means I can wait a few months longer before having to make another fruit beer! Win-win. By the way, "snakebite" thing is actually pretty good - essentially a black and tan with cider in the tan half.
Jon H.

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2013, 06:24:35 PM »
I made an apple pie beer last year at my wife's request. It was not good.
I made a 4 gallon batch with 6lbs of lme, 1/2lb crystal 60, 1/2lb flaked oats, 1/2 lb biscuit, 1/2lb maltodextrin. 1/2oz ekg at :60, 1/2 oz ekg at :15, cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla and 1 gallon fresh apple cider after chilling.

It was flat and lifeless. Nice apple aroma, but just sorta off.
I would recommend a similar beer and cider in a snakebite to get the apple pie effect.

I did make a float with ice cream made with my vanilla stout and the apple pie beer. That was pretty good. Kinda like an apple pie a la mode
- Charles

cornershot

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Re: Apple pie ale
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2013, 06:55:30 PM »
I don't know that you will get much in the way of flavor from the brown sugar. It looks like you are going for a pretty chewy beer so I might add a little molasses instead.

Why so many different grains? Do you have a reason for each?

That's ALOT of flaked barley.

I will say that I LOVE a nice 'black velvet' or 'snake bite' or whatever they call it in your neck of the woods when you float half a pint of stout on top of half a pint of cider.

Finally got to try this black velvet and it's really nice. Mine's made with my dry stout and my common cider which is tart and dry with a good apple flavor and aroma. What can I say? The blend just works. Glad I didn't brew the apple pie ale. This is(probably) much better!