Author Topic: Beginner questions. . .  (Read 630 times)

Offline kpaterniti

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Beginner questions. . .
« on: March 17, 2010, 11:34:28 AM »
About a year ago I started drinking craft beers.  It started when I took a tour of the Great Lakes Brewery for my birthday just before Christmas. . . and tasted their "Christmas Ale".  I was hooked and soon started trying out all kinds of new beers, many of which I love and some haven't gotten a taste for yet.  I am interested in trying to brew my own beer and have done some reading on the subject.  Is there a microbrewery kit that comes highly recommended?  I have read Zymurgy "An introduction to homebrewing", is there further reading needed or should I buy a kit and just jump into making beer?

Online denny

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Re: Beginner questions. . .
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2010, 11:45:10 AM »
Probably some of the best info around is in John Palmer's "How to Brew".  There's an online copy of the first edition at howtobrew.com, but I really recommend you buy the 3rd edition.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Beginner questions. . .
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2010, 12:28:23 PM »
+1  And if that bogs you down a bit, get Papazian's  The Complete Joy of Homebrewing.  Less technical and a little dated, but more entertaining and an easier read.
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Offline tygo

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Re: Beginner questions. . .
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2010, 12:31:52 PM »
+1  And if that bogs you down a bit, get Papazian's  The Complete Joy of Homebrewing.  Less technical and a little dated, but more entertaining and an easier read.

Yeah, I have to agree there.  Palmer's the better technical reference but if that was the first book on homebrewing that I ever read I think I would have felt a little overwhelmed.
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Offline boognishlager

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Re: Beginner questions. . .
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2010, 06:29:50 PM »
I'm just a beginner too, so I don't think I could help as much as these other guys. (Just check out the post I have about my first batch lol) But as far as brewing, I found it a lil easier for me to by a kit that has everything in it with a recipe, and just followed along with that. I felt that it would help get get a better understanding of the process and ingredients. But I can tell you this much for sure, just have fun with it and enjoy it.

Offline Dbbrewing

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Re: Beginner questions. . .
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2010, 04:02:07 AM »
Probably some of the best info around is in John Palmer's "How to Brew".  There's an online copy of the first edition at howtobrew.com, but I really recommend you buy the 3rd edition.
[/quote

++1 I would suggest that you read all you can about brewing.

Offline makemehoppy

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Re: Beginner questions. . .
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2010, 10:11:41 AM »
Look for a homebrew club in your area, check out local sites for Big Brew Day on May 1st to see homebrewing live. Look for a local homebrew shop. The instructions that come with a typical 5 gallon homebrew kit will get you through the first batch, but having a support group around you will make it easier.

Offline euge

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Re: Beginner questions. . .
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2010, 11:13:13 AM »
The books are great to have. Palmer's is a must IMO.

http://www.amazon.com/How-Brew-Everything-Right-First/dp/0937381888/ref=pd_sim_b_2

http://www.amazon.com/Designing-Great-Beers-Ultimate-Brewing/dp/0937381500/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_b

Ray Daniels "Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles" is also a very useful resource.

I bought "The Complete Joy of Homebrewing" by Papazian back in 1993. Respectfully, while I read it voraciously it is no match for How to Brew 3rd ed.

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Homebrewing-Third-Harperresource-Book/dp/0060531053/ref=pd_sim_b_2

But! To get started Palmer has a very respectable online version: http://www.howtobrew.com/

I haven't done any of these but if you like Rogue ales they have "kits" but really are for knowledgeable homebrewers. We can give you some easy extract recipes that should turn out better than Coopers' kits.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman