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Possible noob question about growing yeast

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mosinnagant:
When making a fruit based cider, would there be any benefit to making growing some yeast from the fruit you'll be using in the cider?  I have no idea if local fruit, water, yeast, etc, would have any benefit at all in the brewing process :)

morticaixavier:
Sure, you can but it's a slightly risky option. The problem is you don't know what other micro biota you might be dealing with. Nothing that's going to hurt you understand, just might not taste good. if you are after a consistent product it's usually recommended to stun anything growing on the fruit with campden tablets (potassium metabisulfate?) and add a known strain of yeast.

personally I like the cut of your jib and suggest you have at. get some local apple cider (un-pasteurized) and put it in a glass carboy/bucket and let it go. see if your local ecosystem produces something you like.

Slowbrew:
You would be using a wild culture and there is no guarantee what you would end up with.  I ' m not saying you shouldn't try it but I would caution to start out with a small batch.  That way if get earthy, pine tar, with ragweed flavor you won't feel so bad about throwing it out.   ;D  You have no way to know if what you will get started is a yeast or a bacteria and the flavors from wild strains of either can be absolutely great or horribly, horribly bad.

And, not to be an language freak but..., you don't make yeast.  Yeast make themselves.  We culture/grow yeast but we don't make it.  Some other higher process or power made it unless you are geneticist in which case maybe you can.   8)

garc_mall:
To add to this, If you are going to use the bugs that live on the cider, Patience is Paramount.

I had a gallon of local cider start fermenting on its own, and so I let it sit (with the cap loosened) to allow it to ferment. The first 2-3 months may have been some of the worst sulfur smells I have ever smelled, but after about 3-6 months, the sulfur blew off, and left a great complex apple/lactic flavor, with a touch of barnyard. It turned into a great cider that was very tasty, and incredibly deep in flavor, despite being completely dry (.998).

If you are going to do what Mort recommends, take a gallon of cider, pour out about 1 1/2 cups, and put the lid back on softly, cover with foil, or add an airlock. I wouldn't do more than a gallon until you know you like it.

mosinnagant:

--- Quote from: Slowbrew on October 14, 2013, 10:57:28 AM ---You would be using a wild culture and there is no guarantee what you would end up with.  I ' m not saying you shouldn't try it but I would caution to start out with a small batch.  That way if get earthy, pine tar, with ragweed flavor you won't feel so bad about throwing it out.   ;D  You have no way to know if what you will get started is a yeast or a bacteria and the flavors from wild strains of either can be absolutely great or horribly, horribly bad.

And, not to be an language freak but..., you don't make yeast.  Yeast make themselves.  We culture/grow yeast but we don't make it.  Some other higher process or power made it unless you are geneticist in which case maybe you can.   8)

--- End quote ---

That's why I asked, cause I've never tried it :)  I'm still researching home brewing, don't even have anything to get started, just wanting to learn as much as I can first. 

As for the language, I'm from the south, we call all soda Coke.  "Hey, you want a Coke?"  "Sure!"  "What kind you want?"  "Dr Pepper!" :D

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