Author Topic: Oxygenation in first few days?  (Read 2283 times)

Offline erockrph

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2414
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • Critical Tastings
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #30 on: November 24, 2013, 02:26:04 PM »
Also, if my fermentation is done and has not gone further, after transferring and conditioning in secondary, do I need to add any yeast before bottling given the size of this beer? Want to make sure that there is enough to work with to bottle condition.

It wouldn't hurt to add a little yeast at bottling as insurance. There's no telling what condition your yeast will be in. It could be fine, it could be sluggish. A quarter pack of US-05 should be more than enough.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Online kramerog

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 774
    • View Profile
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #31 on: November 24, 2013, 06:01:09 PM »
For insurance purposes, I would use a wine yeast because its cheap ($0.50 for 5 g), tolerates high levels of alcohol, and won't ferment out the remaining complex sugars.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 08:48:21 AM by kramerog »
Brewers of South Suburbia
Brixie's Brewers

Offline nicosan1

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 46
    • View Profile
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #32 on: November 25, 2013, 06:47:00 PM »
How about Distiller's Yeast?

Online morticaixavier

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 5656
  • Davis, CA
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #33 on: November 26, 2013, 08:41:20 AM »
How about Distiller's Yeast?

that would likely be more attenuative of complex sugars I would think, could be wrong. The benefit of using wine yeast is that is selected for easting simple fructose/glucose while brewers yeast (and I suspect distillers yeast) strains are more selected for the complex sugars found in malt based wort/beer.

So if your beer is at all underattenuated, by adding wine yeast you are less likely to have further fermentation beyond the priming sugar (simple sugar). that's the idea.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Online kramerog

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 774
    • View Profile
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #34 on: November 26, 2013, 08:53:19 AM »
I'm guessing the distiller's yeast is for secondary fermentation to drive the F.G. down.  Agreed that it would not be a good choice as a bottling yeast unless you had already fermented with distiller's yeast.
Brewers of South Suburbia
Brixie's Brewers

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8130
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #35 on: November 27, 2013, 01:13:36 AM »
A distiller I spoke with recently recommended not using distillers yeast for anything but vodka.  He said they use ale yeast for their whiskey because the off flavors from distillers yeast come through even after distilling.  Based on that, I would not use it for carbonation.
Tom Schmidlin

Online morticaixavier

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 5656
  • Davis, CA
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #36 on: November 27, 2013, 09:10:11 AM »
I tried the beers white labs was sampling out at NHC that they brewed with their line of distillers yeast, whisky specific yeasts according to the marketing, and none of them seemed in anyway over attenuated. I suspect distillers yeast, while they may have a higher alcohol tolerance don't actually attenuate any better (within a range of variation).
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11626
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #37 on: November 27, 2013, 09:54:37 AM »
A distiller I spoke with recently recommended not using distillers yeast for anything but vodka.  He said they use ale yeast for their whiskey because the off flavors from distillers yeast come through even after distilling.  Based on that, I would not use it for carbonation.

In addition to the fact that it just isn't necessary!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline nicosan1

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 46
    • View Profile
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #38 on: November 27, 2013, 02:44:23 PM »
at this point I am just going to transfer to the secondary. Even though I used London Ale yeast packets for fermentation, should I add any yeast in secondary, like say one more pack of Wyeast London or a dry pack of Safale US 5 to ensure carbonation when I bottle condition? 

Online morticaixavier

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 5656
  • Davis, CA
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Oxygenation in first few days?
« Reply #39 on: November 27, 2013, 02:55:52 PM »
at this point I am just going to transfer to the secondary. Even though I used London Ale yeast packets for fermentation, should I add any yeast in secondary, like say one more pack of Wyeast London or a dry pack of Safale US 5 to ensure carbonation when I bottle condition?

yeah, it is cheap insurance. I would stick with some of the London ale for reasons of relative attenuation discussed above. You could save yourself a few bucks and pull a little slurry from the bottom of the primary and use that as your extra yeast. Or just be less careful about racking clean beer only and get a little yeast carryover. Or use KramerOg's suggestion of cheap dry wine yeast.

I also question the decision to move to secondary vs. just bottling now. I have tried it both ways and I'm not convinced there is a huge flavor difference between bulk ageing and bottle ageing.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller