Author Topic: She's Alive!  (Read 626 times)

Offline duboman

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2014, 10:52:24 AM »
Just needs more time....

When I bottle they'll sit at 70-75 for at least 10-14 days, a few days in the fridge and they're good to go, lower temps mean slower process to carbonate.

Also note that higher gravity beers may take longer due to the higher alcohol content. I've had some 8-10% beers take over a month
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Offline rabeb25

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2014, 03:02:16 PM »
Maybe I am overly sensitive to it but I can certainly taste the difference between bottle carbing and force carbonation, and strongly prefer force carbonation as I feel its "cleaner".

I have always looked at it like this(so correct me if I am wrong). If you ferment warm you get esters, and bottle carbing is another fermentation. So why would you ferment a beer (bottle carb) above normal fermentation temps and under pressure, is that not just asking for esters?
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2014, 03:40:57 PM »
Maybe I am overly sensitive to it but I can certainly taste the difference between bottle carbing and force carbonation, and strongly prefer force carbonation as I feel its "cleaner".

I have always looked at it like this(so correct me if I am wrong). If you ferment warm you get esters, and bottle carbing is another fermentation. So why would you ferment a beer (bottle carb) above normal fermentation temps and under pressure, is that not just asking for esters?

when you allow a yeast growth phase warm you get esters. there is little to no growth phase in bottle conditioning thus little or no esters. Can you taste the bottle conditioning in a Sierra Nevada beer?

now, on a homebrew level we tend to leave a LOT more yeast in the bottle when bottle conditioning than SN does and that could well make a difference.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2014, 02:13:21 AM »
Funny but I've always (all of my life) preferred kegged beer. That's just CO2, no extra yeast. But, I like what Palmer says. CO2 is CO2, bottle conditioned isn't better its just different.

Maybe some people like the difference

Offline majorvices

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2014, 02:45:15 PM »
Keep in mind that warm fermentation temp will create fusels, which are literally oils, that can kill head retention. If you fermentation temp got much higher than 79 degrees this could be your head retention problem.
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Offline FLbrewer

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2014, 04:07:45 PM »
Keep in mind that warm fermentation temp will create fusels, which are literally oils, that can kill head retention. If you fermentation temp got much higher than 79 degrees this could be your head retention problem.
Good point, but this batch was very consistent in temps. Getting lucky in Florida over the past few months.

Offline majorvices

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2014, 04:12:19 PM »
FYI typed that on my phone. Meant to say 70. That's temp of fermentation. If your room is at, say, 64 your ambient is "OK". Just remember to add 6-8 degrees to your ambient for the temp of fermentation - which generates its own heat. If you keep your house much warmer than 64 it's a bit too warm for most ale yeasts.
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Offline FLbrewer

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2014, 04:17:04 PM »
FYI typed that on my phone. Meant to say 70. That's temp of fermentation. If your room is at, say, 64 your ambient is "OK". Just remember to add 6-8 degrees to your ambient for the temp of fermentation - which generates its own heat. If you keep your house much warmer than 64 it's a bit too warm for most ale yeasts.
6-8 degrees? Wow, wasn't aware it was that much higher. I currently use a water bath which keeps it pretty tight. I'll check the surrounding water and use a UV gun to check the glass. Counting down the days until I get a wine cooler.

Offline duboman

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2014, 05:55:23 PM »

FYI typed that on my phone. Meant to say 70. That's temp of fermentation. If your room is at, say, 64 your ambient is "OK". Just remember to add 6-8 degrees to your ambient for the temp of fermentation - which generates its own heat. If you keep your house much warmer than 64 it's a bit too warm for most ale yeasts.
6-8 degrees? Wow, wasn't aware it was that much higher. I currently use a water bath which keeps it pretty tight. I'll check the surrounding water and use a UV gun to check the glass. Counting down the days until I get a wine cooler.
if you are using a water bath and swapping ice bottles to maintain temps, you should be okay and the ambient isn't such an issue, that's what I used to do prior to ferm chamber and found it did a really nice job maintaining a consistent temp.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2014, 06:00:18 PM »

FYI typed that on my phone. Meant to say 70. That's temp of fermentation. If your room is at, say, 64 your ambient is "OK". Just remember to add 6-8 degrees to your ambient for the temp of fermentation - which generates its own heat. If you keep your house much warmer than 64 it's a bit too warm for most ale yeasts.
6-8 degrees? Wow, wasn't aware it was that much higher. I currently use a water bath which keeps it pretty tight. I'll check the surrounding water and use a UV gun to check the glass. Counting down the days until I get a wine cooler.
if you are using a water bath and swapping ice bottles to maintain temps, you should be okay and the ambient isn't such an issue, that's what I used to do prior to ferm chamber and found it did a really nice job maintaining a consistent temp.

Same here. I did it for years before I got my first used fridge and temp control. Worked pretty well. Just gotta remember/budget time for exchanging frozen bottles. That's where I got the idea to use frozen bottles to help the IC chill my wort down to pitching temps too. Still do it.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2014, 08:41:49 AM »
So why would you ferment a beer (bottle carb) above normal fermentation temps and under pressure, is that not just asking for esters?

Fermenting under pressure reduces ester production.
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Offline euge

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2014, 09:21:57 AM »
I'd be surprised to see much of a temp difference from ambient with that small of a fermentation and volume. ???

If the glass isn't squeaky clean or you use a rinse aid in the dishwasher that can lessen head retention dramatically.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2014, 03:37:31 PM »
I guess I didn't realize it wasn't a 5+ gallon ferment. But your still going to pick up some appreciable exothermic activity. Best to know EXACTLY what your temps are. Does OP know that? If he doesn't then don't rule it out! Stick on Fermometer is a good start.
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Offline FLbrewer

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Re: She's Alive!
« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2014, 04:17:06 PM »

I guess I didn't realize it wasn't a 5+ gallon ferment. But your still going to pick up some appreciable exothermic activity. Best to know EXACTLY what your temps are. Does OP know that? If he doesn't then don't rule it out! Stick on Fermometer is a good start.
Yes, I know what temp it was at. Or I believe to be within a degree or two.


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