Author Topic: Dry Hopping  (Read 579 times)

Offline foxbrew

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Dry Hopping
« on: November 02, 2013, 04:57:14 PM »
hey all -

i just brewed an IPA that calls for 2 ounces of Cascade hops after 7 days in the primary.  the recipe i was using was for a 5 gallon batch, but i ended up doubling the recipe to 10 gallons.  can i just add 4 ounces of hops, or is it more complicated than that?  i know that doubling a recipe isn't always as simple as just doubling the malt/hop bill...

thanks for your help.

Offline mcdanis

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Re: Dry Hopping
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2013, 05:10:55 PM »
You should be fine doubling the dry hops. No worries.
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Online klickitat jim

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Re: Dry Hopping
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2013, 07:16:01 PM »
Agreed. Though some around here would use a pound or more. I won't name names.
After 7 days is fine. But, I like to dry hop after the bulk of the fermentation is completed and that's not a scheduled thing. Could be a week, could be two or three. The idea is to not have the bubbling CO2 carry away all those beautiful aromas. You're good to go once airlock activity stops or better yet once you hit terminal gravity.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2013, 07:19:57 PM by klickitat jim »

Offline fmader

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Re: Dry Hopping
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2013, 07:34:17 PM »
Good advice from Jim. Wait til your fermentation has settled down. This could be a couple of weeks. 4 ounces will work for your batch.... Wouldn't hurt to put 10 ounces in either  ;)
Frank

Offline erockrph

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Re: Dry Hopping
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2013, 08:14:13 PM »
As far as dry hops goes, at homebrew scales it's close enough to simply scale the dry hops linearly. So a double batch would get twice the amount of dry hops.

As far as timing goes, there's no real wrong way to do it. If you start while the yeast are still active, then the yeast will transform certain compounds in dry hops into others. This will change the aroma profile of the dry hops. If you wait until after fermentation is complete, then less biotransformation will occur. It's really a matter of taste, so go with whatever you prefer.

And - guilty as charged. I would actually advocate a pound of hops as being a good starting point for 10 gallons of IPA :)
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Dry Hopping
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2013, 08:28:27 PM »
+1.  I use ~ a lb total, ~ 6 oz of which as dry hops,  in a standard AIPA.  For years I dry hopped toward the end of fermentation and liked my results. But as mentioned, this method can result in some yeast produced compounds that slightly alter the hop character, according to Stan Hieronymous in a 2013 Zymurgy article. I took his advice on my next IPA and transferred to a secondary, let the beer clear pretty well, then dry hopped. I feel that in comparison the hop character is better this way, and that , if anything, lasts longer because much less of the hop character is attached to suspended yeast ( most of which has settled out and been racked off of) .  I'm sold.
Jon H.

Offline TrippleRippleBrewer

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Re: Dry Hopping
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2013, 02:01:21 PM »
hey all -

i just brewed an IPA that calls for 2 ounces of Cascade hops after 7 days in the primary.  the recipe i was using was for a 5 gallon batch, but i ended up doubling the recipe to 10 gallons.  can i just add 4 ounces of hops, or is it more complicated than that?  i know that doubling a recipe isn't always as simple as just doubling the malt/hop bill...

thanks for your help.

You are correct in that doubling isn't always that simple but at the home brew scales we make beer, it's not as big of an issue. It's not an issue whatsoever with dry hopping. Just double it or go moar bigger if you like aroma.

I concur with the process of racking and then dry hopping as being a bit better having done it both ways as well. You get a bit more aroma more dependably.

BUT - I frequently dry hop in the primary anyway because lazy!
Also no or less risk of oxidation during racking which I've done and which has ruined a few beers for me.
You don't want any air leaks in the racking cane / hose interface and you don't want splashing. Purge the receiving vessel - carboy or keg or whatever with CO2 if you can. I like to use 2 canes. I use the ubiquitous siphon racking cane in the primary and use a straight acrylic cane in the receiving vessel so I don't have to fight with the hose curling and falling out of the vessel. I purge with CO2 usually.

My most recent IPA was 1.065 OG pitched S05 yeast, fermented in the mid 60's and I waited 10 days for the primary to be visibly complete before putting 5oz of hops in the carboy. Cascade was not one of them but I like those ( doesn't everyone? ) I like all the krausen to be sunk and most of the dusty yeast to settle before throwing the dry hops in there. No airlock activity should be observed as others have stated.
I also feel if it takes 10 to 12 days whatever for the beer to clear to a certain point, that's how long I'll wait to dry hop. I usually go 7 days at the most out of convenience as I like to brew and rack on weekends.  I've found little difference between 4 and 7 days dry hop effect save for better settling of the hops when they sit longer but I don't rush things. Beer needs time and the beer is ready on it's own terms.
I don't recommend letting them sit longer than 14 days and the one time I did that, I did not care for the results.

I would imagine you have 2 carboys and the batch is split. You doubled the recipe so you should double ( at least! ) the dry hops and put 2oz in each. I would try 4oz in one, and 2oz in the other and see if you can tell the difference.
Growing Centennial, Columbus and Chinook hops.
Brewing IPA, APA, Dead Guy clone, and American Wheat most of the time.
Located in Three Rivers MI

Online Steve in TX

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Re: Dry Hopping
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2013, 03:57:42 PM »
...I like to use 2 canes. I use the ubiquitous siphon racking cane in the primary and use a straight acrylic cane in the receiving vessel so I don't have to fight with the hose curling and falling out of the vessel.

Stealing this!

I do purge, but I like this.