Author Topic: Tannin Insurance  (Read 708 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Tannin Insurance
« on: November 08, 2013, 10:12:06 PM »
I've been searching the forum and other sources for water help lately. I got some good low tech advice on using gypsum and CaCl lately. I grabbed some lactic at the LHBS today cuz it was cheap, and cuz I think I've been getting a little tannin extraction in my lighter colored beers.

I did more browsing on lactic tonight. Most of it over my head and more technical that I need to get.

I'm trying to keep my brewing as off-grid as possible. Cute way of saying "dumbed down" to the point that I don't need a laptop and spreadsheets to make good beer.

I have a water lab report in my future, but for now... Here is the beer I'm planning for next week. I'm posting it to see if I'm way off on something.

7# Castle Pilsner
.5# carapils
PNW well water
Mash 2:1 @ 145° with 4 grams CaCl
Sparge with 5 gallon of 170° with 1/4 tsp lactic 88%

90 min boil
1 oz Willamette at 60
.5 oz Willamette at 15
nutrient and whirlfloc at 5

Wyeast 2112 from 2000ml starter

55° till done
32° crash

Targets
OG 1.042
IBU 20
SRM 3
ABV 4%

Is there too much lactic?
Enough to prevent tannins?
My well water is pretty close to 7pH according to my cheap gardening meter.

Offline yso191

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Re: Tannin Insurance
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2013, 01:03:03 AM »
Hi Jim,

I regularly use lactic to get the pH of the mash down.  Consequently I have asked a similar question.  The safe zone for lactic so that you won't taste it is no more than 1 ml per gallon of finished beer.  1/4 tsp. is only 1.23 ml, so no way will the flavor come out. 

I cannot answer whether it will get your mash pH down into the range you need it to be though.  But half an answer is better than none.
Steve

Offline duboman

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Re: Tannin Insurance
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2013, 06:04:42 AM »
I know they are not the most reliable but have you tried the pH strips, better than nothing. It's true that lighter grain bills have less ability to reduce mash pH than darker grains so it is possible to experience what you are.

Most of my beers with relatively hard Chicago water require 1-2ml lactic both mash and sparge total, not per gallon so I think that would be a good place to start
Peace....Love......Beer......

The Commune Brewing Company-Perfecting the craft of beer since 2010

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Tannin Insurance
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2013, 09:00:17 AM »
I've used the colorpHast strips to check my mash pH several times. But I don't think I've ever checked the sparge pH. I'll be doing that for sure, and keeping in mind what Kai's page says, that they typically read .3 lower than actual.

Offline denny

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Re: Tannin Insurance
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2013, 10:00:45 AM »
Jim, without an analysis I don't know how much good guessing at water treatments will do for you.  How certain are you that you're getting undesirable tannins?  IME, more brewers worry about the problem than actually have it.  If you want to ship me some beer, I'd be happy to give you my opinion.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Tannin Insurance
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2013, 10:38:41 AM »
Samples getting bottled next week. So I'll be shipping about mid Dec.

I fully agree though. I know no one can really say what's needed when you don't know what you have. I'll be shipping a water sample to Ward in the near future.

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Tannin Insurance
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2013, 04:42:00 PM »
Well I got a couple things to think about....suggest you try, some PH strips
a down n dirty cheep and ez way to determine where your mash is at for Ph.

then do not forget about acid malt that is for bringing that mash Ph number
down toward the desired 5.2 level.  Also consider addition of some
food grade phosphoric acid to the mash if you are still having trouble
getting to that majic number.  Be aware that the effect is logrythmic and
not linear as you would expect....ie....drop drop drop drop ....good,... drop drop drop
dammit....
A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Tannin Insurance
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2013, 05:02:28 PM »
I ordered a Ward Lab test today, so this is about to become a non problem for me, hopefully.
I have colorpHast strips. I'll be using them.
Thanks for the input