Author Topic: Yeast starter time question  (Read 3120 times)

Offline S. cerevisiae

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Re: Yeast starter time question
« Reply #90 on: October 23, 2014, 07:36:23 PM »
Ok so here's a new variation on my question S.: I am brewing a Dunkel Sunday. 6 gallons at 1.054. My WLP833 was harvested 9/15/14 and (I'm sorry for the reference) beersmith roughs it in at almost 70% viability. I have 2L, 5L, and 1G vessels. What is my best path to about 400-450B cells? I made a 1.25L starter of 1.031( measured) tonight and pitched to this with the plan of then crashing, decanting and pitching to 2.75L of 1.04 wort. Am I in good shape, or in the future would you suggest just a larger 1 step starter. This plan came mainly from my understanding of what you had stated earlier in the thread

You are fine.  The 5L vessal is your best bet, but you need a way to seal it while shaking.

You could have pitched the White Labs vial into 2L of 1.040 wort and been with it. 

Let me know how the fermentation turns out.  If you have the time to monitor the fermentation closely, take good notes.  Any change in the fermentation should be logged.  The log entry should include the date, time, fermentation temperature, and any observation.  The goal here is to get a better handle on how the yeast culture behaves after being pitched.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2014, 11:27:45 AM by S. cerevisiae »

Offline 69franx

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Re: Yeast starter time question
« Reply #91 on: October 25, 2014, 08:07:45 PM »
Thanks S. I will report back as best as possible. It will be in a chest freezer set at 50, and I won't be pitching till next morning before work,( having a bit of a warm spell here in low 70's) I will try to make observations before and after work all week. The second step is going great, just about 2.5L and been shaking regularly. Really cool to hear all the CO2 escaping from under the foil as I shake. Plan is to crash in the morning in same freezer I will be chilling wort in overnight, then decant and pitch Monday morning
Frank Laske
Franx Brew Works
Fermenting: The Queen's Diamonds EBW
Conditioning:
In Bottles: Split Open And Melt RIS, My first Cider,  BCS Dunkel, Denny's BVIP, Simple Saison, Bock Me traditional Bock, Nothing Special About It (ordinary, now Special Bitter)
In the works: House IPA, You're my Hero Hazelnut Double Brown, Ringler Pilsner from Ron Price recipe in the wiki, "Barky Pilsner" also from wi

Offline 69franx

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Re: Yeast starter time question
« Reply #92 on: October 28, 2014, 04:07:05 PM »
My starter wound up in 2 steps: about 1.25L and 2.75L. I pitched Monday morning about 7am. There were a couple random bubbles popping through the airlock by about 6pm and it was going good when I took the dogs out before bed around 11. It is steady chugging along  now and I posted(or tried to post) a cell phone video with audio of it sitting in my Vessel in the chest freezer. Link is in beer recipes under "BCS Dunkel" thanks for all the help


Sent from Franx Brew Works using Tapatalk
Frank Laske
Franx Brew Works
Fermenting: The Queen's Diamonds EBW
Conditioning:
In Bottles: Split Open And Melt RIS, My first Cider,  BCS Dunkel, Denny's BVIP, Simple Saison, Bock Me traditional Bock, Nothing Special About It (ordinary, now Special Bitter)
In the works: House IPA, You're my Hero Hazelnut Double Brown, Ringler Pilsner from Ron Price recipe in the wiki, "Barky Pilsner" also from wi

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Yeast starter time question
« Reply #93 on: November 02, 2014, 12:02:38 PM »
Yes Arcadia uses Ringwood. One of the Brewers said it was a "Fussy b****" in that it would require more attention some times, ie rousing.

Grizzly Peak in Ann Arbor had a Pugsley system and would struggle with Diacetyl. They changed to Essex and the beers are much improved. They open ferment and top crop. The problem is they don't have the tank time for a long D rest, they were doing close to 1600 barrels on a 7 barrel system. WLP -022 produces clean beer for them.

Real Ringwood is a Yorkshire square multi-strain yeast culture that requires rousing and aeration during fermentation, or it will tend to produce a diacetyl bomb.  While the culture is named after the microbrewery Peter Austin built after he retired from the Hull Brewery, Ringwood originally came from Webster's Brewery (a.k.a. the Fountain Head Brewery) in Halifax, West Riding, Yorkshire.   

If one examines a Peter Austin designed/Alan Pugsley installed brewery closely, one finds a device that I like to refer to as a Yorkshire shower head.  This device is used to rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation (yes, I said rouse and aerate the yeast during fermentation), as can be seen at time 0:12 in this video shot at the Blacksheep Brewery in North Yorkshire: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJmLNj14C_w.   It can also be seen in the following video, which was shot a Peter Austin designed /Alan Pugsley built brew pub in Baltimore, Maryland: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGIThQ7w0ls (the device is also used to aerate wort).
Arcadia has the Pugsley system, I don't know if it is still in Battle Creek or at the new production brewery in Kalamazoo. The next time I see the brewer I will ask her more specifics on her feelings about Ringwood.

She said the pumps had to be turned on (not sure she said when), as the years drops in 3 days if done or not.

The best time for them to top crop was at 1.022. They thought they would have the timing figured out, but sometimes it would be much earlier, which had some stories associated.

After fermentation, she said the beer had to be kept away from O2 to the point that they would purge the tanks and transfer lines. Just a little air would create diacetyl from the leftover precursors.

There was a much that had to be done to make beer with low diacetyl, according to her. 
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild, AHA Member, BJCP Certified
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!