Author Topic: Mashing High, possible issues?  (Read 2457 times)

Offline dolecek21

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Mashing High, possible issues?
« on: November 20, 2013, 12:18:33 PM »
I'm planning on brewing a Scottish ale (80/- export) this weekend and am planning on mashing at 158 F. I calculate the strike water to be ~172 F (using beersmith). This would be as high of a mash temp as I have used. I don't expect any problems , as I haven't heard anyone else mention anything, but the thought crossed my mind. At what point do you have to start being concerned about denaturing the enzymes with a high single infusion mash? I've always added grain to water to reduce dough balls, and I guess that could make a difference. I'd also guess the time spent at the high temperature would play a big role.

Has anyone had an issue with mash efficiency at higher mash temps?

Online Jimmy K

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2013, 12:26:23 PM »
Don't worry about it. You're talking about a very common practice. A few reasons would be - even if exposed to high temperatures, the enzymes don't denature instantly. And even if you denature some enzymes, modern malt has plenty to make up for it.
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Offline garc_mall

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2013, 12:53:21 PM »
For my session beers, I mash at 162. I have had no conversion issues.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2013, 02:06:51 PM »
Seems way high strike temp. How much water, grain, grain temp?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2013, 02:47:47 PM »
I heat my strike water often ~ 13 degrees above target mash temp, depending on time of year since I use a cooler and store it in the garage.  His is 14 degrees - I think the strike temp looks high because he's mashing high.
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Offline dolecek21

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2013, 02:57:38 PM »
Thanks, ya I figure it's not going to be a problem. I think I'm curious as much as anything.

The calculation is using 1 qt/lb water to grain ratio, cooler and grain temp ~ 72 (room temp). My grain bill is just under 10 lbs. Depending on how cold it is on Sat., I will most likely pre-heat my cooler/tun which would lower the strike water temp a bit.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2013, 03:31:41 PM »
The strike calculator I use is always accurate. With 10#, 2.5 gallon, 72° grain, I show 175° strike.

Offline dannyjed

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2013, 04:07:48 PM »
I don't think you'll have any issues. I heard that Lagunitas mashes their beers at 160 and I think they make some good stuff.
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Offline ccfoo242

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2013, 05:06:14 PM »
I use 158 to 160 often with water temp being around 170 going in like you have. No worries.


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Offline Three

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2013, 06:08:56 PM »
I mash in a cooler as well.  With a grain temperature of 72-75 I add my strike water and let it cool and mash in when the water is 9-10 degrees from what I'm striving for.  The results have been very consistent.  My typical mash is 14 to 18 lbs of grain with about 1.35 quarts of water per pound.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2013, 08:20:00 PM »
yeah, I mash session beers at 162 all the time. I would think that 1qt/lb is a little thick and that might affect your conversion efficiency some. If your after big and malty consider no sparge.

Mash at around 2qt/lb and, if the number seem like you'll need a bit more pre-boil, add it as a mash out step.
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Offline garc_mall

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2013, 09:47:18 PM »
yeah, I mash session beers at 162 all the time. I would think that 1qt/lb is a little thick and that might affect your conversion efficiency some. If your after big and malty consider no sparge.

Mash at around 2qt/lb and, if the number seem like you'll need a bit more pre-boil, add it as a mash out step.

Agreed, if you are looking to make a session-ish beer that is malt forward (like a Scottish) I would no-sparge if it is possible on your system.
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Offline dolecek21

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2013, 02:55:55 PM »
yeah, I mash session beers at 162 all the time. I would think that 1qt/lb is a little thick and that might affect your conversion efficiency some. If your after big and malty consider no sparge.

Mash at around 2qt/lb and, if the number seem like you'll need a bit more pre-boil, add it as a mash out step.

Agreed, if you are looking to make a session-ish beer that is malt forward (like a Scottish) I would no-sparge if it is possible on your system.

Ya, I mis-typed that part. I usually shoot for 1.5 qt/lbs (what I meant to type), and plan on that for this one as well. OG = 1.050.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2013, 04:14:10 PM »
In that case, 10 lbs, 4.25 gallons, 72° grain, = 168° strike for 158° mash.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Mashing High, possible issues?
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2013, 04:42:29 PM »
In that case, 10 lbs, 4.25 gallons, 72° grain, = 168° strike for 158° mash.

bump that a couple of degrees to pre-heat the mash tun and your at 170ish.
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