Author Topic: Aging in a keg  (Read 641 times)

Offline BP79

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Aging in a keg
« on: December 03, 2013, 07:57:22 AM »
I'm finally building a kegerator this weekend after Williams-Brewing had an awesome deal where I was able to score a free keg in addition to the one in the kit.  I've had an Imperial Stout in the primary for 4 weeks now that I've had some issues with (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=17387.0) that I'd like to age for a while before tapping.  It seems most people will just add enough CO2 to purge the oxygen in the tank, then let it sit at room temp for a few x months depending on the style of beer?

Offline Jimmy K

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Re: Aging in a keg
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2013, 08:04:38 AM »
You can certainly age in a keg. It's a nice, fully enclosed, air free container. The beer doesn't care if it's glass or stainless steel.
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Offline thebigbaker

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Re: Aging in a keg
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2013, 08:09:32 AM »
I recently started aging beers in kegs.  I did this with my strong winter beers the end of August and have my winter warmer on tap now.  I think it tastes better than when I aged it in a carboy last year. 

I take a clean sanitized keg, fill w/ some CO2 to purge any oxygen, fill the keg, purge, and let sit in the basement to age at about 17 psi.  Once it's ready to go into the kegerator, I connect it up, release the CO2 and set the psi at serving pressure.  Ready to go in about a week. Not sure if this is the perfect way to do it, but it has worked for me so far.

 
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Offline BP79

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Re: Aging in a keg
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2013, 08:27:50 AM »
Great, thanks for the tips.  Dumb question - will it matter that some of the CO2 would get absorbed by the beer?  It's just there to prevent oxidation initially, right?   

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Aging in a keg
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2013, 08:30:26 AM »
It will not matter.  Some will get absorbed, but no worries.
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Offline ajk

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Re: Aging in a keg
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2013, 09:14:54 AM »
I age in kegs under CO2 pressure.  Somewhere I heard beer ages better in larger containers, but I don't have a reference.  Anyone?

Offline Pinski

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Re: Aging in a keg
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2013, 09:24:12 AM »
Great, thanks for the tips.  Dumb question - will it matter that some of the CO2 would get absorbed by the beer?  It's just there to prevent oxidation initially, right?

The CO2 is used to purge O2 from the keg yes, but also make sure that you pressurize enough to set your gaskets and properly seal the keg as well.  Usually  ~10-12 psi does the trick if the gaskets don't seal from the clamp pressure. 
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