Author Topic: Cold Crashing  (Read 1103 times)

Offline blatz

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Cold Crashing
« on: December 05, 2013, 03:00:56 PM »
have you ever noticed whether or not cold crashing in the fermentor oxidizes your beer?
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Offline speed

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2013, 03:14:41 PM »
What is your thinking on this? Possibly dropping the temp will suck o2 in?

Offline blatz

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2013, 03:16:00 PM »
What is your thinking on this? Possibly dropping the temp will suck o2 in?

Exactly.
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Offline speed

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2013, 03:27:09 PM »
I guess one way to remedy this would be to transfer to keg and pressure it with co2 .

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2013, 03:33:23 PM »
I've noticed zero oxidation by cold crashing my primary. Though I suppose there is some infinitesimal amount, but not as much as opening the lid to take a gravity reading or to rack.

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2013, 03:39:50 PM »
yeah, oxidation reactions are going to occur very very slowly when everything is cold so even if o2 is introduced it's not going to be noticeable very quickly at all.
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2013, 05:59:45 PM »
yeah, oxidation reactions are going to occur very very slowly when everything is cold so even if o2 is introduced it's not going to be noticeable very quickly at all.

+1.  Or if you start splashing it around...

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Offline Steve in TX

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2013, 06:18:14 PM »
Plug your fermenter with a solid stopper.

I use these with my better bottles.

http://www.williamsbrewing.com/10-VENTED-SILICONE-STOPPER-P2667.aspx

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2013, 07:04:07 PM »
I prefer to rack to keg, top off with CO2, then crash and charge at same time.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2013, 08:21:09 AM »
I have not noticed an issue, but I only crash my lagers in the primary so the temp difference is much smaller and the amount of O2 getting in is probably very small as well.
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Offline leejoreilly

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2013, 08:55:38 AM »
I prefer to rack to keg, top off with CO2, then crash and charge at same time.

+1

Offline beersk

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2013, 09:45:04 AM »
Paul, are you experiencing some off flavors in your beers?
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Offline blatz

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2013, 09:51:18 AM »
Paul, are you experiencing some off flavors in your beers?

just a little bit- my latest IPA is not quite as hoppy in aroma as usual, though not what I would consider oxidized.

I'd just read another brewer, whom I respect, being very OCD about crashing his IPAs and how he feels he oxidized one by crashing with too much head space in the fermentor, which got me thinking.

Lately, I've been crashing in the primary on a lot of beers to get the cleanest/clearest beer possible in the keg, but maybe I will go back to transferring to a keg, dryhopping and then crashing/carbing.
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Offline beersk

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2013, 09:55:06 AM »
I usually blow some co2 into the headspace before I bung the carboy and cold crash. I don't think it causes any issues, but I can see where you're coming from. Got palate fatigue? ;)
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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2013, 10:49:57 AM »
have you ever noticed whether or not cold crashing in the fermentor oxidizes your beer?

By the time I'm cold crashing, whatever vessel I do it in is sealed.  There's no chance for O2 to enter.
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