Author Topic: Leave the Trub behind...or not?  (Read 880 times)

Online majorvices

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Re: Leave the Trub behind...or not?
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2013, 05:54:44 AM »
Wort-hog. Yes, supposedly excessive trub can cause problems with cell budding, as can excessive hop resins. But other studies show some trub acts as nutrients. I think I also have read that there's enough cold break trub to act as nutrients you need and feel good if you want to leave all hot break behind. For me, I don't see that much difference to leave as much behind as possible but not sweat some. I would not go as far as removing cold break by racking the next day (unless maybe if you have a conical). I personally would not dump all the trub into my fermentor but others seem fine doing this. Best bet it to just brew it both ways and see what works best. For me, I use yeast several hens so I want to leave as much behind as possible.
Keith Y.
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Offline brewsumore

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Re: Leave the Trub behind...or not?
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2013, 01:19:06 AM »
I do 10-gallon batches that I chill with an immersion chiller that I remove after chilling the wort while stirring, and then wait at least 10 minutes before runoff first through a fine mesh strainer.  The first bucket filled gets considerably less trub in it.  I leave as much trub and pellet hop spooge behind as possible, including typically at least 1/2 gallon of liquid.  Although both buckets are filled the same and sit in the same fridge ferment chamber, sometimes one does not come out as well as the other all other things being equal while practicing quality sanitary practices.  I figure the primary reason for a difference in flavor and occasionally color too, is when I transfer too much trub/spooge into the second bucket fermenter.  I generally need to transfer some trub since I max out my keg kettle to yield 11 gallons/5.5 gallons wort per bucket, each of which yields 5 gallons of finished beer into a corny keg.  For batches with really heavy hop load and break material, to reduce the amount of trub transfer instead of running off via the kettle's ball valve I'll transfer from the top down using a siphon.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2013, 01:20:38 AM by brewsumore »

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Leave the Trub behind...or not?
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2013, 06:11:36 PM »
I've been using fine mesh bucket bags with good success.  Put bag in bucket(don't forget to clamp the bag in place), pour in wort then pull out slowly while alternately picking up the bottom corners to allow the wort to get through the trub and hop material.  It gets very clean and you can see all the trub when you wash it out.

Dave
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Offline brewsumore

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Re: Leave the Trub behind...or not?
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2013, 06:23:12 PM »
I'm going to jump on the bandwagon and make a copper pickup tube similar to Denny's, and try stirring again after removing my IC to see what kind of trub cone I can get going.  The main reason I haven't already done so is that I've been afraid it will substantially increase my runoff time, and I'm also concerned about the pickup tube clogging.  It's time to experiment.  Any recommendations on how wide of an opening to leave on the copper pickup tube on the partially flattened end?  Thanks.