Author Topic: Harvested Yeast Question  (Read 788 times)

Offline In The Sand

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Harvested Yeast Question
« on: December 23, 2013, 04:50:28 PM »
Harvested this wlp 001 from a pale ale last Friday. This is my first time and I'm about to use it to make a starter for an IPA I'm doing Friday. In this picture, you will see a very small light colored layer between the beer and the darker yeast(?) layer at the bottom. Is this light layer the only viable yeast from what I harvested?
Trey W.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2013, 06:25:58 PM »
How did you harvest? Swirl and pour? Or did you wash it?

I swirl and pour. I also don't do a starter if my harvest is fairly fresh. I decant the beer and pitch a cup to a cup and a half of the harvest. (Amount depending on OG or Lager)

When I restart I only use about 100 ml of the harvest in a 2000ml stir start

Offline In The Sand

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2013, 06:34:40 PM »

How did you harvest? Swirl and pour? Or did you wash it?

I swirl and pour. I also don't do a starter if my harvest is fairly fresh. I decant the beer and pitch a cup to a cup and a half of the harvest. (Amount depending on OG or Lager)

When I restart I only use about 100 ml of the harvest in a 2000ml stir start

I rinsed it then transferred to one gallon container. Decanted beer then transferred yeast off trub to one quart container. Put in fridge. I thought people always make starters with harvested yeast. Especially if you want it to go farther. But I don't know that's why I'm asking the questions.
Trey W.

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2013, 08:36:57 PM »
It's hard to tell from the picture but I think that middle layer is yeast and the rest is just trub material. The volume of trub you got in the jar indicates you didn't decant enough steps and/or you did not let it settle long enough before decanting.

When you do that rinse process it's all about temperature and time. The warmer the trub/water mix the longer it takes for the junk you don't want to drop out. You need to let it sit long enough that the stuff you don't want drops out but the yeast hasn't started to settle out. The more trub you start with the longer you need to rest before you decant the liquid to another container but generally you should be resting around 15-20 minutes the first time or two before you move the liquid into its final destination.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2013, 08:55:44 PM »
I found washing rinsing to be more trouble than its worth.

It looks good to me though. Starters fine just don't over pitch it. As fresh as it is I'd decant, and pitch the needed amount as is.

Online ynotbrusum

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2013, 03:45:04 AM »
I found washing rinsing to be more trouble than its worth.

It looks good to me though. Starters fine just don't over pitch it. As fresh as it is I'd decant, and pitch the needed amount as is.

+1.  I pretty much only make starters when starting with a new vial or smack pack, because I time my brew days for when another beer is ready to be racked from primary to keg.  Plus, a lot of times I will pitch from the vial or smack pack directly into a small batch and just step up the batch size successively to get to my standard 10 gallon batch.  Just something to consider...
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Offline davidgzach

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2013, 06:37:46 AM »
Harvested this wlp 001 from a pale ale last Friday. This is my first time and I'm about to use it to make a starter for an IPA I'm doing Friday. In this picture, you will see a very small light colored layer between the beer and the darker yeast(?) layer at the bottom. Is this light layer the only viable yeast from what I harvested?

Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave
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Offline In The Sand

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2013, 07:06:53 AM »
Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

Holy crap! That's only about 50-75 ml of yeast.  To do a 1.060 beer Mr. Malty says I need about 250 ml.  So do I just pitch 250 ml of everything that's in the jar?

Trey W.

Offline In The Sand

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2013, 07:13:00 AM »
It's hard to tell from the picture but I think that middle layer is yeast and the rest is just trub material. The volume of trub you got in the jar indicates you didn't decant enough steps and/or you did not let it settle long enough before decanting.

When you do that rinse process it's all about temperature and time. The warmer the trub/water mix the longer it takes for the junk you don't want to drop out. You need to let it sit long enough that the stuff you don't want drops out but the yeast hasn't started to settle out. The more trub you start with the longer you need to rest before you decant the liquid to another container but generally you should be resting around 15-20 minutes the first time or two before you move the liquid into its final destination.

After the rinsing process I transferred it from a 6-gal carboy to a one gallon glass jar.  I let it settle and stratify for about an hour.  The jars I used were sanitized in boiling water the night before, so the water wasn't warm.  The water and yeast/trub were about the same temperature (65-70F).

After the one gallon glass jar settled for about another hour, I transferred to the one quart jar in the picture.  Then I put that in the fridge because I didn't see anymore obvious trub at that time.  So what is in the picture has been crashing for about 84 hrs.
Trey W.

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #9 on: December 24, 2013, 07:49:49 AM »
Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

Holy crap! That's only about 50-75 ml of yeast.  To do a 1.060 beer Mr. Malty says I need about 250 ml.  So do I just pitch 250 ml of everything that's in the jar?

Mr. Malty says you need 250ml of yeast slurry, not yeast.  You have separated the yeast from the slurry.  If you did a decent job washing you have plenty of yeast for a 1.060 beer.

Dave 
Dave Zach

Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #10 on: December 24, 2013, 07:52:37 AM »

Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

How long the slurry is 'good' without a starter is based on volume and viability. You can wait 3-4 weeks as long as you have enough slurry.

I usually take the Mr. Malty calcs as gospel when it comes to slurry age/viability, even if they are a bit conservative.

Personally, if its been longer than a week, I'll make a small starter to boost viability and reduce lag/cleanup time, especially if its a finicky yeast or a lightly flavored beer (Kolsch, helles, Pils, etc).
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Offline In The Sand

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #11 on: December 24, 2013, 08:00:15 AM »
Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

Holy crap! That's only about 50-75 ml of yeast.  To do a 1.060 beer Mr. Malty says I need about 250 ml.  So do I just pitch 250 ml of everything that's in the jar?

Mr. Malty says you need 250ml of yeast slurry, not yeast.  You have separated the yeast from the slurry.  If you did a decent job washing you have plenty of yeast for a 1.060 beer.

Dave

Excellent clarification.  Thanks Dave!
Trey W.

Offline In The Sand

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2013, 08:02:09 AM »

Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

How long the slurry is 'good' without a starter is based on volume and viability. You can wait 3-4 weeks as long as you have enough slurry.

I usually take the Mr. Malty calcs as gospel when it comes to slurry age/viability, even if they are a bit conservative.

Personally, if its been longer than a week, I'll make a small starter to boost viability and reduce lag/cleanup time, especially if its a finicky yeast or a lightly flavored beer (Kolsch, helles, Pils, etc).

So if it's a week from when I harvested and it's a WLP001 slurry going from a pale ale to a heavily hopped IPA, chances are it's perfect for the job?
Trey W.

Offline davidgzach

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #13 on: December 24, 2013, 08:12:43 AM »

Yes, that layer is your viable yeast.  Decant the top off, pour that in to another jar and don't worry if a little trub follows.  You have 3-4 weeks to make another beer until you should probably make a starter.  I sometimes go up to 2 months depending how good of a separation and wash I got.

Dave

How long the slurry is 'good' without a starter is based on volume and viability. You can wait 3-4 weeks as long as you have enough slurry.

I usually take the Mr. Malty calcs as gospel when it comes to slurry age/viability, even if they are a bit conservative.

Personally, if its been longer than a week, I'll make a small starter to boost viability and reduce lag/cleanup time, especially if its a finicky yeast or a lightly flavored beer (Kolsch, helles, Pils, etc).

So if it's a week from when I harvested and it's a WLP001 slurry going from a pale ale to a heavily hopped IPA, chances are it's perfect for the job?

Looking good!   8)
Dave Zach

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Harvested Yeast Question
« Reply #14 on: December 24, 2013, 09:22:38 AM »
http://thebrewingnetwork.com/shows/984

Give this a listen. According to Palmer, a thin layer of white on top of washed yeast is yeast hulls. The healthy yeast is between that and trub at the bottom.