Author Topic: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...  (Read 3137 times)

Offline yugamrap

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #45 on: December 30, 2013, 08:17:49 AM »
The carbonator cap for 2L bottles.  It's very difficult to get the QDs on and off, and the poppet/spring in that thing is way too firm.  I'll stick with growlers.
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Offline braufessor

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #46 on: December 30, 2013, 08:33:10 AM »
V-Vessel Fermenters.  bought two.  The neck was really narrow and they ALWAYS plugged up.  The "collection ball" never really filled up with yeast well - if it did, it was a pain getting it back out.  They were horrendous to clean..... just nothing really good to say about them.

Offline denny

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #47 on: December 30, 2013, 09:45:52 AM »
There was an article in the Nov. 2013 BYO on the differences in a crystal and cara malt that might help. I can't remember if the topic of cara-red came up.

I did some research on this for the book.  The differences are very slight differences in process that produce very slightly different flavors.  Here's an excerpt...

"Crystal malts are typically produced at colors of 20L, 30L, 40L, 60L, 80L, 90L, and 120L.  The exact colors available will vary depending on the maltster.  When you look at crystal malt, you’ll notice that it’s a mix of lighter and darker grains.  The color is specified by an average of the grain colors.
It has also been claimed that the use of crystal malts slows oxidative reactions in beer and improves its stability by preventing the formation of oxidized flavors.
Here’s a description of the similarities and differences from Dave Kuske, Director of Malting Operations at Briess Malt & Ingredients Co.   

“Q: What's the difference between Caramel and Crystal Malts?
A: Dave Kuske, our Director of Malting Operations, explains it this way.
The difference between Caramel and Crystal malts involves both terminology and chemistry and production differences. 
As for terminology, the European maltsters landed on crystal malt as the descriptor of malts that go through a conversion step where starches are rapidly (typically within 45 minutes) converted to sugars and the sugars are then crystallized at high temperatures in a roaster. Somewhere in our distant past, it was decided that our crystal style malts produced in the same manner were given the name caramel Malt.
The term caramel really refers to the process of pyrolisis of sugars. When I give presentations on the process, I encourage the audience to envision a candy thermometer. There are different temperature "breaks" where different "types" of caramel are produced and each have unique and very different physical and flavor properties. Crystal style malt is in reality the end process of achieving high enough temperatures to produce a 'hard crack' type caramel inside of each malt kernel, which results in a hard glassy endosperm. This crystallization lends unique properties to the flavor and functionality of the malt. In order to achieve crystallization, the actual kernel temperature must exceed 300ºF, which requires much higher applied temperatures only achievable using a roaster, which has the burner capacity to reach in excess of 700+ºF if needed.
There are Caramel malts on the market that are produced using a kiln. The green malt is heated at minimal airflow and is held at high moisture content for an extended period of time (more like hours than minutes) on the upper kiln to "stew" the malt to allow the enzymes to break the starches into sugars.  It is a tricky step on the kiln because it is difficult to get the wet malt heated up to the enzyme optimum temperatures (60-70ºC or 140-158ºF) without drying the malt in the process, which slows the enzymatic breakdown. I liken it to trying to heat up a wet bath towel. After stewing, the malt is heated at the highest temperature possible on the kiln, which is not hot enough to actually crystallize the sugars due to maximum temperature limitations on the kiln. In most cases, 220-240ºF burner temperature is as high as one can achieve on a kiln, which falls far short of crystallization temperature of the predominant sugars. There is some caramelization that occurs at the lower temperatures, but the majority of the color and flavor development is due to the Maillard reaction (sugar + amino acid) which provides a different flavor profile and a mealy/powdery endosperm."
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Offline kramerog

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #48 on: December 30, 2013, 10:04:31 AM »
The carbonator cap for 2L bottles.  It's very difficult to get the QDs on and off, and the poppet/spring in that thing is way too firm.  I'll stick with growlers.

I love the carbonator caps although I get what you are saying.
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Offline yso191

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #49 on: December 30, 2013, 10:41:12 AM »
Good info Denny, thanks for posting it.
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Online Steve in TX

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #50 on: December 30, 2013, 12:28:55 PM »
Kent lock carbonator caps. Girlfriend was on a flavored sparkling water kick so I figured we could make are own and not use so many plastic bottles. Way too fragile for the job. Love my other kent lock fittings.

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #51 on: December 30, 2013, 12:42:52 PM »
Good info Denny, thanks for posting it.
+1
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Offline mugwort

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Re: What's the product that upon purchase you've been most disappointed with...
« Reply #52 on: December 30, 2013, 02:16:49 PM »
The carbonator cap for 2L bottles.  It's very difficult to get the QDs on and off, and the poppet/spring in that thing is way too firm.  I'll stick with growlers.

You said it!  Not to mention the carbonator I ordered was a constant leaker.  Sad.
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Offline chumley

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This will date me.....but I would have to say the Phil's sparge arm.  Kept losing the little stoppers in the ends, the holes would plug up with hard water deposits, the water temperature in the plastic bucket would drop too quickly before fly sparging was done, etc.  Thank God for batch sparging.

Offline denny

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This will date me.....but I would have to say the Phil's sparge arm.  Kept losing the little stoppers in the ends, the holes would plug up with hard water deposits, the water temperature in the plastic bucket would drop too quickly before fly sparging was done, etc.  Thank God for batch sparging.

At least Dan admitted how worthless those arms were!
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Online HoosierBrew

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This will date me.....but I would have to say the Phil's sparge arm.  Kept losing the little stoppers in the ends, the holes would plug up with hard water deposits, the water temperature in the plastic bucket would drop too quickly before fly sparging was done, etc.  Thank God for batch sparging.

+1.  That stroke of engineering genius ( :D ) is one of the main reasons I switched to batch sparging !
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I know these actually work, but I bought a propane burner shield with the intent of blocking the wind and keeping the flame going...but I bought it two weeks before we moved into our new house where I brew indoors. Yep years of training and experience as a disciplined leader/planner and I can't get over the excitement and compulsion to buy a new shiny toy.
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Offline Pinski

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The carbonator cap for 2L bottles.  It's very difficult to get the QDs on and off, and the poppet/spring in that thing is way too firm.  I'll stick with growlers.

You said it!  Not to mention the carbonator I ordered was a constant leaker.  Sad.

Really? I have two of the carbonator caps that I use all the time and I'd be bummed to be without.  That said, I don't use them to "slow" carbonate beer at low pressure over a period of days. I use them to carb chilled beer quickly at about 30 psi and shake for 2 minutes or so.  The thing I like most is that I can quickly carb up a hydrometer sample and get a much better preview of what the final beer will be like. 

I never leave gas lines attached for longer than a couple minutes because as mentioned previously they don't always form a tight seal on the QD.  I've not noticed any leakage from the bottle when the carbonator is simply left on as a cap. 

I'd say its a great tool to have in your kit if you need to quickly carb 2L or less. 
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Offline corkybstewart

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I bought a counter pressure filler from morebeer.com.  I used it for a while with good results about half the time, the rest of the time my wife and I were getting sprayed.  Never did figure out why 3 or 4 bottles filled perfectly, then the next spewed everywhere and no settings changed.  Finally I got a Beergun and never looked back.
Also I have an inline oxygenator.  Once I turned the gas on it would override the flow from my March pump and everything came to a standstill.  I have a much stronger pump now, I'll give it another shot soon.
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Offline dzlater

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I have a stainless domed false bottom for my round cooler.
I used it for quite a while. Never could get the wort to run clear, and I had to run off real slow or else I'd get a stuck sparge.
I started to put the grain a grain bag in the tun with the false bottom. I got a much clearer run off, and if the sparge stuck I could just lift out the grain bag.
Finally I got smart and switched to a hose braid, wish I would have done that from the start. But I had some fool idea that I wanted to fly sparge and just had to have the false bottom.