Author Topic: Final gravity and moutfeel  (Read 646 times)

Offline troybinso

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Final gravity and moutfeel
« on: December 30, 2013, 11:35:00 AM »
If you check your final gravity with a hydrometer, then the reading describes the density of the beer, right? Does density correlate with mouthfeel? If so, imagine you have two beers, both finishing at 1.012, but one had a starting gravity of 1.045 and the other was 1.065. Would these beers basically have the same mouthfeel?

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2013, 11:59:56 AM »
I would say that gravity is only part of it. Mouthfeel is affected by ingredients like oats, flaked barley, rye or differing amounts of hops as well as the degree of carbonation and probably much more.

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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2013, 12:06:11 PM »
I don't think there is a significantly useful correlation between FG and mouthfeel except in nearly identical beers. As Al says there are many other factors contributing.

I have made saisons with an FG hovering right around 1 (sometimes under 1) that have great big rich mouthfeel and I've made Scottish 60/- with FG in the 1.010+ range that feel pretty thin.

Carbonation makes a huge difference as do other factors such as ingredients.

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Offline erockrph

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2013, 12:21:45 PM »
For two identical recipes that finish at different gravities, and are carbonated to the same level, then I'd imagine that there would be some correlation between mouthfeel and gravity. Otherwise, there are too many other factors at play. Mort's example of a Saison is a perfect example. WY3711 will finish in the low single digits, but has a remarkably full (but not heavy), juicy mouthfeel. Flaked barley or oats in a stout is another example of adding body without gravity points.

FG is really only useful information within the context of a particular recipe.
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Offline In The Sand

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2013, 12:40:18 PM »
+1 to all of the above, especially CO2 vols.
Trey W.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2013, 12:43:29 PM »
FG is important to me to measure attenuation, but as said mouthfeel is more recipe/grist dependent.
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Offline euge

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2013, 03:04:37 PM »
Yeast and fermentation play a role as well. I'm always chasing a particular mouthfeel I get from certain Belgian and English ales. That's part of the obsession I suppose.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2013, 03:32:08 PM »
Yeast and fermentation play a role as well. I'm always chasing a particular mouthfeel I get from certain Belgian and English ales. That's part of the obsession I suppose.

for sure. I had the Diue de Ciel wit beer a year ago and have been trying to get the silky mouthfeel ever since. I can't seem to get it with flaked adjuncts alone which leads me to believe it's in part the yeast. Course now I can't find that beer around here anymore so I can't steal the yeast!
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2013, 04:37:58 PM »
Yeast play a big role for sure.  WY3711 is a great example.


<EDIT>

I would argue that mash temp can influence mouthfeel as well.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2013, 05:02:50 PM by HoosierBrew »
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Offline denny

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2013, 09:17:56 AM »
I think FG influences body more than mouthfeel.
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Offline yso191

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2013, 10:17:15 AM »
Also consider beta-glucans.  Less modified malts (like Belgian styles), oats, etc. will add beta-glucans and really ramp up the viscosity of a beer.
Steve

Offline denny

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2013, 11:15:40 AM »
There seems to be confusion here between body and mouthfeel.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2013, 11:25:10 AM »
There seems to be confusion here between body and mouthfeel.

How do you distinguish the two things Denny?
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Offline denny

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2013, 11:55:33 AM »
There seems to be confusion here between body and mouthfeel.

How do you distinguish the two things Denny?

From the BJCP Study Guide...

"The body of a beer is characterized as its fullness, viscosity, or thickness on the tongue and palate;
descriptors range from watery or characterless to satiating or thick. Body is a component of mouthfeel,
which encompasses physical sensations such as astringency, alcoholic warmth and carbonation; the
combination of all those components determines how the beer stimulates the palate. The body is
determined by the levels of dextrins and medium-length proteins. Lack of dextrins is caused by low
saccharification temperatures, excessive use of adjuncts or by highly attenuative yeast strains. A low
protein level may be caused by excessively long protein rests, excessive fining or the addition of large
amounts of fermentable sugars. Light body is appropriate in American light lagers and lambics, but not
in strongly malt-accented styles such as barleywines, Scotch ales, and doppelbocks."
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Online Pinski

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Re: Final gravity and moutfeel
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2013, 12:01:10 PM »
There seems to be confusion here between body and mouthfeel.

How do you distinguish the two things Denny?

From the BJCP Study Guide...

"The body of a beer is characterized as its fullness, viscosity, or thickness on the tongue and palate;
descriptors range from watery or characterless to satiating or thick. Body is a component of mouthfeel,
which encompasses physical sensations such as astringency, alcoholic warmth and carbonation; the
combination of all those components determines how the beer stimulates the palate. The body is
determined by the levels of dextrins and medium-length proteins. Lack of dextrins is caused by low
saccharification temperatures, excessive use of adjuncts or by highly attenuative yeast strains. A low
protein level may be caused by excessively long protein rests, excessive fining or the addition of large
amounts of fermentable sugars. Light body is appropriate in American light lagers and lambics, but not
in strongly malt-accented styles such as barleywines, Scotch ales, and doppelbocks."

That's the take-away. Thanks for sharing that Denny.
Thank you BEER!