Author Topic: Crash Cool Question  (Read 813 times)

Offline davidgzach

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1659
    • View Profile
Crash Cool Question
« on: January 04, 2014, 08:13:11 AM »
So I get why air needs to revert back in to the carboy or bucket as the beer cools to lagering temps.  But when the beer is at lagering temps, why is my blow off tube still sucking in water?  I have to release the pressure every couple of hours. 

Dave
Dave Zach

Offline Jimmy K

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3616
  • Delaware
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2014, 08:46:26 AM »
Is the beer still cooling or at stable temp?

- Sent by my R2 unit

Delmarva United Homebrewers - President by inverse coup - former president ousted himself.
AHA Member since 2006
BJCP Certified: B0958

Offline davidgzach

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1659
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2014, 08:50:02 AM »
Is the beer still cooling or at stable temp?

- Sent by my R2 unit

Beer is at stable temp Jimmy.  That's what I don't get. 
Dave Zach

Offline morticaixavier

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 7395
  • Underhill VT
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2014, 09:59:44 AM »
Is the beer still cooling or at stable temp?

- Sent by my R2 unit

Beer is at stable temp Jimmy.  That's what I don't get.

If negative pressure is still buildingin the carboy then the beer is not yet at stable temp.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time"
-A Einstein

Offline davidgzach

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1659
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2014, 10:24:47 AM »
Is the beer still cooling or at stable temp?

- Sent by my R2 unit

Beer is at stable temp Jimmy.  That's what I don't get.

If negative pressure is still buildingin the carboy then the beer is not yet at stable temp.

Mort, the bucket with the temp probe has been stable for 2 days, yet still has some negative pressure.  Could it have anything to do with the yeast storing up for hibernation?

Edit:  There are 3 buckets in the chest freezer....
« Last Edit: January 04, 2014, 11:08:59 AM by davidgzach »
Dave Zach

Offline Steve in TX

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2950
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2014, 01:30:26 PM »
Total shot in the dark here

Could the negative pressure build to a point where the bucket looses its seal allowing new air to come in? The the new air compresses further sucking more liquid up the blowoff.

Offline davidgzach

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1659
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2014, 02:09:24 PM »
Total shot in the dark here

Could the negative pressure build to a point where the bucket looses its seal allowing new air to come in? The the new air compresses further sucking more liquid up the blowoff.

Hmm.  If the air is the same temp in the chest freezer, would that make a difference?  I don't know.
Dave Zach

Offline jeffy

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2822
  • Tampa, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2014, 02:14:08 PM »
Total shot in the dark here

Could the negative pressure build to a point where the bucket looses its seal allowing new air to come in? The the new air compresses further sucking more liquid up the blowoff.

Here's another theory, if the fermenter is in a fridge then when you open the door you let out the greater-than-ambient air pressure which was keeping the pressure equalized when the door was shut.
I just made that up, but it almost makes sense. 
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline davidgzach

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1659
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2014, 02:17:38 PM »
Total shot in the dark here

Could the negative pressure build to a point where the bucket looses its seal allowing new air to come in? The the new air compresses further sucking more liquid up the blowoff.

Here's another theory, if the fermenter is in a fridge then when you open the door you let out the greater-than-ambient air pressure which was keeping the pressure equalized when the door was shut.
I just made that up, but it almost makes sense.

It makes sense to me.  The only thing is that after time like 3-4 days it finally equalizes.  I just checked and the water was only sucked up about an inch instead of halfway to the bucket as before.
Dave Zach

Offline davidgzach

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1659
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2014, 07:30:59 AM »
Bumping this to get some of the experts opinions.  I'm thinking it's yeast related but would really like to understand this.  I lost a lager this summer because of blow off water getting sucked back in the fermenter.  I use vodka now but that evaporates quickly.  Was thinking about switching to cut down air locks as my freezer is a tight fit for buckets.  Only a few inches of head space which is why I use blow off tubes.  I'm in a quandary!  :o ???

EDIT:  No offense to the other experts that already replied...... ;)
« Last Edit: January 05, 2014, 07:35:25 AM by davidgzach »
Dave Zach

Offline morticaixavier

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 7395
  • Underhill VT
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2014, 07:47:09 AM »
No offense taken. I'm not sure what else it could be though. If liquid is moving up the blow off tube it is because the pressure out side the bucket/blow off system is greater than that inside. Could be temp drop inside, could be a leak in the bottom of your bucket, could be atmospheric pressure changes. After all you have essentially built an atmospheric pressure meter.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time"
-A Einstein

Offline reverseapachemaster

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1774
    • View Profile
    • Brain Sparging on Brewing
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2014, 10:30:56 AM »
Can't help you with why it's happening but using an S airlock instead of a blow off tube will help prevent the liquid from sucking back in.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing but I'm also a lawyer: The Kielich Law Firm

Offline Pinski

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1714
  • Portland, Oregon
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2014, 10:48:41 AM »
Can't help you with why it's happening but using an S airlock instead of a blow off tube will help prevent the liquid from sucking back in.
+1
Steve Carper
Green Dragon Brew Crew
Clubs: Oregon Brew Crew & Strange Brew
BJCP Certified

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6179
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #13 on: January 05, 2014, 10:59:03 AM »
+1. Or lager in a corny.
Jon H.

Offline Steve in TX

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2950
    • View Profile
Re: Crash Cool Question
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2014, 11:09:38 AM »
Or use a solid lid/stopper.