Author Topic: Dry hopping an Old Ale  (Read 470 times)

Offline Joe Sr.

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Dry hopping an Old Ale
« on: January 06, 2014, 09:19:28 AM »
I don't dry hop much, but I have an Old Ale I think I'd like to dry hop.

The recipe was 100% Centennial (inspired by Bell's Third Coast Old Ale).

I have more Centennial.  I have Cascade, Willamette, Fuggle, Goldings, Strissesplat, Northdown, Hallertau, maybe Saaz.  Others, but I don't have them all in front of me to be sure.

Any advice on what might go well with the Centennial?  Stick with it?  Or go a different route?
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Offline fmader

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2014, 09:34:39 AM »
I would stick with just using Centennial. I think it's about as versatile as they come and work well alone... In saying that they are versatile, I add them in with about all hop combos I use.
Frank

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2014, 09:36:02 AM »
Fuggles and Goldings would be a more traditional choice. I'm trying to imagine a big sweet malty old ale with hops and I waffle between the earthy, spicy, herbal combo I get with the Goldings/Fuggles (shh denny, to each their own) combo and the brighter citrus/pine thing if you used centennial and/or cascade.

Gosh.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2014, 09:41:10 AM »
Fuggles and Goldings would be a more traditional choice. I'm trying to imagine a big sweet malty old ale with hops and I waffle between the earthy, spicy, herbal combo I get with the Goldings/Fuggles (shh denny, to each their own) combo and the brighter citrus/pine thing if you used centennial and/or cascade.

Gosh.

It's already brewed, so the Centennial is foregone.

I'm a fan of Fuggles/Goldings even if some think they taste like dirt.  Just not sure that dirt will mix well with the Centennial.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2014, 09:41:26 AM »
This is one where I would mix the Centennial with some Willamette or Fuggles to dry hop with. Not normally a Fuggles fan, but it seems appropriate here.
Jon H.

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2014, 09:42:43 AM »
I think I read a post from Sean where he said that he likes the combo, BTW.
Jon H.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2014, 09:43:05 AM »
Fuggles and Goldings would be a more traditional choice. I'm trying to imagine a big sweet malty old ale with hops and I waffle between the earthy, spicy, herbal combo I get with the Goldings/Fuggles (shh denny, to each their own) combo and the brighter citrus/pine thing if you used centennial and/or cascade.

Gosh.

It's already brewed, so the Centennial is foregone.

I'm a fan of Fuggles/Goldings even if some think they taste like dirt.  Just not sure that dirt will mix well with the Centennial.

I got that it was already brewed, just thinking about the dry hops. Unless you get a lot of fruit from centennial which apparently some folks do I would think the piney/citrus flavor with the earthy spicy aroma would work. I think of mulled wine.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2014, 11:17:07 AM »
I see what you're saying now.  I'll have to taste it again and see.  I don't think I get citrus, but I need to refresh my memory.

This half of the batch I fermented with Nottingham, which I've had good luck with on high-gravity beers.  Unfortunately, it tasted tart when I last sampled it.  Not a lot, but that Notty tartness that I don't care for.  I'd like to bury it with hops.

Interesting that I'm not getting updates after I visit the site.  But I think my log-in is not auto-logging in...
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline denny

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2014, 11:27:28 AM »
I wouldn't dry hop an old ale at all.
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Offline hoser

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2014, 11:31:18 AM »
Depends upon what you dry hop with.  I have a dry-hopped old ale every year around this time.  It's called Hibernation and it's fantastic!!! ;D

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2014, 11:42:48 AM »
I wouldn't dry hop an old ale at all.

I'm hoping to mask the Nottingham.  Maybe age will do that?

Any other suggestions?

FWIW, I'm splitting five gallons and will put oak chips in one half.  Was thinking of dry hopping the other.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline denny

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2014, 02:19:59 PM »
I wouldn't dry hop an old ale at all.

I'm hoping to mask the Nottingham.  Maybe age will do that?

Any other suggestions?

FWIW, I'm splitting five gallons and will put oak chips in one half.  Was thinking of dry hopping the other.

For my tastes, I'd just age it.  But I haven't tasted YOUR old ale...maybe dry hops would work in it.
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Offline goschman

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2014, 02:45:58 PM »
FWIW, Great Divide's award winning old ale Hibernation is dry hopped...think it's been a while since they won anything...

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2014, 03:21:20 PM »
For my tastes, I'd just age it.  But I haven't tasted YOUR old ale...maybe dry hops would work in it.

I suppose it could always be aged and then dry hopped if I felt like it at the time.  It never seems to age as long as I'd like, though.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Dry hopping an Old Ale
« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2014, 03:27:01 PM »
For my tastes, I'd just age it.  But I haven't tasted YOUR old ale...maybe dry hops would work in it.

I suppose it could always be aged and then dry hopped if I felt like it at the time.  It never seems to age as long as I'd like, though.
this is the best thing about bulk ageing in a (gasp) secondary. it makes it harder to consume on a whim. and with a big beer like this it can deal with a little oxidation.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller