Author Topic: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale  (Read 548 times)

Offline jaftak22

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
    • View Profile
Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« on: January 07, 2014, 10:43:20 PM »
So once again I am asking all these newbie questions. I honestly try and research first before coming here, but it is what it is. So I have an IPA that is getting transferred to the secondary tomorrow to dry hop. There is a beautiful 1 inch layer of yeast on the bottom right on top of the sediment. I am going to harvest it for future use. I am making a 10 gallon batch of a pale ale recipient I found next Wednesday. So would this yeast be ok for a pale ale, or should I stick to a IPA the next time I use it?  So many frickin questions! I should buy a book on yeast.

Online morticaixavier

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6081
  • Davis, CA
    • View Profile
    • The Best Artist in the WORLD!!!!!
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2014, 10:56:24 PM »
I think it would be fine. you might get some hop bitterness carryover but probably not a ton. If you want you could make a starter with a tablespoon of the yeast from the IPA and use that in the Pale Ale. but you don't have to.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Offline theoman

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 508
  • Outskirts of Brussels, Belgium
    • View Profile
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2014, 01:18:20 AM »
Yeah, what mort said.

Offline gmac

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2098
  • London, Ontario
    • View Profile
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2014, 06:33:28 AM »
I reuse all the time and I have yet to see an issue with flavour carryover. For a 10 gal batch you probably need about a cup or so. Check mr malty. Using the whole cake would be over pitching and that would be worse in my opinion. So a 1/2 cup in 5 gals or so (just guessing- check mr malty) won't be much of a percentage in the final brew.
I say go ahead or do a starter ala mort, either works but I wouldn't personally bother with the starter just for the tiny hop carryover concern.

Offline pinnah

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1160
  • Wesloper, CO
    • View Profile
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2014, 07:19:34 AM »
I wouldn't personally bother with the starter just for the tiny hop carryover concern.

+1. The only time I thought I might have had a little flavor carry over was when I used some spices.

Offline blatz

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2500
  • Paul Blatz - Jupiter, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2014, 07:59:44 AM »
I wouldn't personally bother with the starter just for the tiny hop carryover concern.

+1. The only time I thought I might have had a little flavor carry over was when I used some spices.

+2 i think the idea of pitching from small to big and light to dark is a set of ideal circumstances, but ones which I often break, and needless to say, I've never noticed any problem with it.

that said, I won't repitch yeast from a batch over ~1.070 or something super dark, roasty like my recent american oatmeal stout, unless it was going right back into a stout. 
The happiest people don’t necessarily have the best of everything; they just make the best of everything they have.

BJCP National: F0281

Offline gmac

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2098
  • London, Ontario
    • View Profile
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2014, 08:27:46 PM »
I wouldn't personally bother with the starter just for the tiny hop carryover concern.

+1. The only time I thought I might have had a little flavor carry over was when I used some spices.

+2 i think the idea of pitching from small to big and light to dark is a set of ideal circumstances, but ones which I often break, and needless to say, I've never noticed any problem with it.

that said, I won't repitch yeast from a batch over ~1.070 or something super dark, roasty like my recent american oatmeal stout, unless it was going right back into a stout.

Agreed. Sick and tires yeast is a different issue and I wouldn't go dark to light unless I could live with the colour impact. Schwarzbier to Pilsner, probably a bad idea.

Online majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *****
  • Posts: 6575
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • View Profile
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2014, 05:00:12 AM »
Generally it is better to start with the lower gravity beer (pale ale) and then go to a higher gravity beer (IPA). And recently I got a bit cavalier and decided to test this theory and used a slurry from a 1.077 tripel down to a 1.050 Belgian Pale and dumped the latter.
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline pinnah

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1160
  • Wesloper, CO
    • View Profile
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2014, 07:29:59 AM »
recently I got a bit cavalier and decided to test this theory and used a slurry from a 1.077 tripel down to a 1.050 Belgian Pale and dumped the latter.

Shuucks...how come you dumped it?  were the yeast pooped as predicted or did it have other flaws? 
 

edit: no seriously - just curious why you dumped it.

« Last Edit: January 12, 2014, 09:08:02 AM by pinnah »

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1063
  • Da mihi sis cerevisiam.
    • View Profile
Re: Yeast for IPA then a Pale ale
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2014, 08:17:50 AM »
Generally it is better to start with the lower gravity beer (pale ale) and then go to a higher gravity beer (IPA). And recently I got a bit cavalier and decided to test this theory and used a slurry from a 1.077 tripel down to a 1.050 Belgian Pale and dumped the latter.

Agreed, as to stepping up to higher gravity as the preferred method, but what about using a greater amount of the yeast slurry when stepping down or making a starter to then step down to a lighter gravity?  As to color, couldn't the same idea apply vis a vis a using a starter to avoid the color transfer or stepping down from dark to amber to light copper to lighter lager?
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"