Author Topic: Dry hopping temperature  (Read 1271 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2014, 08:38:22 PM »
Good stuff! Sounds like dry hopping at cold crash is the way to go.

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2014, 09:28:15 AM »
I just finished an email conversation with the experimental brewer at Haas (for those who are not familiar, Haas is the largest hop producer in the world - just not so much to home brewers).  I was asking about a temperature that would be a sweet spot for dry hopping.  I was thinking that hop oils may not get into solution very well at lower temperatures.  What brought this up in my mind is my current IPA that I am about to dry hop, which I fermented at the low end of the range for 1056 (63*) in order to coax some lemony esters out.

His response?  50*F and below!

I thought it would be 70*+.  His main comment was that it doesn't hinder the oils going into solution, and helps avoid a vegetal character, giving a clean hop taste.

I may have to follow up with him on process though because my usual process is to dry hop as fermentation is subsiding, which coincides with when I start ramping the temperature up by 2 degrees per day (1 AM, 1 PM) in order to rouse the yeast to finish fermentation and cleaning up fermentation by-products.

So now I can see myself doing this, then dropping the temp to ~45* to dry hop for a week.  The dissonance I am experiencing is that I have been dry hopping while the yeast is still active in order to counteract any oxygen that is introduced when I dump the hops in.

What are your thoughts?

The times I have dry hopped cold I have come to the exact opposite conclusions. Cold = vegal
Agreed.

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Offline dkfick

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2014, 09:29:23 AM »
The joys of everyone's different taste buds!
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2014, 11:38:50 AM »
I just finished an email conversation with the experimental brewer at Haas (for those who are not familiar, Haas is the largest hop producer in the world - just not so much to home brewers).  I was asking about a temperature that would be a sweet spot for dry hopping.  I was thinking that hop oils may not get into solution very well at lower temperatures.  What brought this up in my mind is my current IPA that I am about to dry hop, which I fermented at the low end of the range for 1056 (63*) in order to coax some lemony esters out.

His response?  50*F and below!

I thought it would be 70*+.  His main comment was that it doesn't hinder the oils going into solution, and helps avoid a vegetal character, giving a clean hop taste.

I may have to follow up with him on process though because my usual process is to dry hop as fermentation is subsiding, which coincides with when I start ramping the temperature up by 2 degrees per day (1 AM, 1 PM) in order to rouse the yeast to finish fermentation and cleaning up fermentation by-products.

So now I can see myself doing this, then dropping the temp to ~45* to dry hop for a week.  The dissonance I am experiencing is that I have been dry hopping while the yeast is still active in order to counteract any oxygen that is introduced when I dump the hops in.

What are your thoughts?

The times I have dry hopped cold I have come to the exact opposite conclusions. Cold = vegal
Agreed.

And I'm the opposite of your opposite!

Me too. It took several grassy batches before I tried dry hopping on the cold side.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2014, 11:59:03 AM »
What temp are you cold dry hopping guys doing it at? Ive has always been under 38 degrees. Maybe that has something to do with it.

Also, I've heard other commercial brewers say the same thing thing (veg flavors at cold temps) so there is some heavy hitters saying this. That doesn't mean anyone is right or wrong but I question why it works or is opposite for some and not others.

Also, when I say "veg" flavors I'm talking more "herbal" like aromas and flavors. Not so much grassy, though that could be one descriptor.
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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2014, 12:03:46 PM »
What temp are you cold dry hopping guys doing it at? Ive has always been under 38 degrees. Maybe that has something to do with it.

Also, I've heard other commercial brewers say the same thing thing (veg flavors at cold temps) so there is some heavy hitters saying this. That doesn't mean anyone is right or wrong but I question why it works or is opposite for some and not others.

Also, when I say "veg" flavors I'm talking more "herbal" like aromas and flavors. Not so much grassy, though that could be one descriptor.

Probably low-mid 40s for me.

You should know by now that I really don't care what the "heavy hitters" say.  I trust my own experience, as everyone should.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2014, 12:33:26 PM »


You should know by now that I really don't care what the "heavy hitters" say.  I trust my own experience, as everyone should.

I'm the same way except when my experience matches up with theirs. I actually have a beer I brew that is meant to pair with a cigar and I dry hop it cold because I get moro herbal character. To be, the flavor is so much cleaner when dry hopped at 60-70.
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Offline ccfoo242

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2014, 01:10:43 PM »
Still too many parameters that need to be clarified.

Pellets or whole cone?
How many days of contact?
All varieties of hops? High alpha or low. High cohumulone or low. Etc.


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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2014, 01:17:42 PM »


You should know by now that I really don't care what the "heavy hitters" say.  I trust my own experience, as everyone should.

 To me, the flavor is so much cleaner when dry hopped at 60-70.


+1.  It gets back to a hop related posting the other day about how people perceive hop character (not just aromas) differently. To me it's much better in this range, but obviously other people feel it's just as good at the other end of the spectrum.
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Offline kylekohlmorgen

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2014, 02:58:44 PM »
What temp are you cold dry hopping guys doing it at? Ive has always been under 38 degrees. Maybe that has something to do with it.

Also, I've heard other commercial brewers say the same thing thing (veg flavors at cold temps) so there is some heavy hitters saying this. That doesn't mean anyone is right or wrong but I question why it works or is opposite for some and not others.

Also, when I say "veg" flavors I'm talking more "herbal" like aromas and flavors. Not so much grassy, though that could be one descriptor.

Right before I transfer, I drop them in the keg and purge. After filling the keg, I purge again and immediately move to the kegorator (45-50F).

I'll start sampling after 3 days or so and pull at the first sign of over-extracted flavor. Total contact time is anywhere from 1-3 weeks, depending on volume/type of beer and amount of hops. Bigger beers get a second, smaller shot of dry hops.

To me, over-extracted hop flavors/aromas are:

"Grassy" - not-so-freshly cut grass (kind of like the inside of a lawn mower bag) as opposed to fresh-cut grass

"Vegetal" - Wilty spinach, overcooked greens

Butter/Diacetyl? - I've always thought this was over-extraction, but I've heard Kara Taylor (White Labs) gave a MBAA presentation on diacetyl formation from yeast due to dry hopping. Would love to read it.

I also think over-extraction of hops (or any herb/spice, for that matter) add astringency 
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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2014, 04:54:13 AM »
I will go back and try dry hopping at 50 degrees and see if I have any problems. I can honestly say I have never tried it below 38 degrees and then it has probably been closer to 32 degrees.
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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2014, 05:27:25 AM »
What temp are you cold dry hopping guys doing it at? Ive has always been under 38 degrees. Maybe that has something to do with it.

Also, I've heard other commercial brewers say the same thing thing (veg flavors at cold temps) so there is some heavy hitters saying this. That doesn't mean anyone is right or wrong but I question why it works or is opposite for some and not others.

Also, when I say "veg" flavors I'm talking more "herbal" like aromas and flavors. Not so much grassy, though that could be one descriptor.

Probably low-mid 40s for me.

You should know by now that I really don't care what the "heavy hitters" say.  I trust my own experience, as everyone should.
So you're not a "heavy hitter", Denny? You're, like, the patron saint of homebrew!  :D
« Last Edit: January 10, 2014, 05:39:07 AM by Big Al »

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2014, 05:28:58 AM »


You should know by now that I really don't care what the "heavy hitters" say.  I trust my own experience, as everyone should.

I'm the same way except when my experience matches up with theirs. I actually have a beer I brew that is meant to pair with a cigar and I dry hop it cold because I get moro herbal character. To be, the flavor is so much cleaner when dry hopped at 60-70.
I can't imagine being able to taste any beer while smoking a cigar.

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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2014, 05:37:30 AM »


You should know by now that I really don't care what the "heavy hitters" say.  I trust my own experience, as everyone should.

I'm the same way except when my experience matches up with theirs. I actually have a beer I brew that is meant to pair with a cigar and I dry hop it cold because I get moro herbal character. To be, the flavor is so much cleaner when dry hopped at 60-70.
I can't imagine being able to taste any beer while smoking a cigar.

Well, that's kind of the point. Cigars kill the flavor of a beer. The key was to brew a beer that the flavor of the cigar melded and changed the flavor of the beer to an interesting flavor. The beer is pretty good by itself, but it is extremely parable with a cigar.

The cold hop extraction gives the beer a more "herbal-like" (to my tastes) character. The first time I brewed it I used whole Amarillo, Columbus and Willamette hops (and a few other hops blended in as well). I found the whole hops to be more herbal and veg like and actually prefer them with the beer but whole hops are more of a challenge for me to work with right now so all pellets now.

The beer is called "Tobacco Road" (the brewery Yellowhammer Brewing) if you are interested in searching.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2014, 05:41:10 AM by majorvices »
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Re: Dry hopping temperature
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2014, 06:29:07 AM »
Sounds like a great beer. Wish I could try it!

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