Author Topic: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process  (Read 964 times)

Offline Jeff M

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How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« on: January 09, 2014, 03:14:15 PM »
Howdy Folks,

One thing i havent gotten much into as of yet is creating and testing new beer recipes. Personally I view this as the art side of Beer, The taking of ingredients and melding them into a wonderful melange of personal preference and experience.  When people drink the beer you have created you are taking them on a journey as it where.

Anyway - Can you guys give an explanation of how you create recipes and the steps you go threw in reviewing and tweeking?

Here has been my process thus far.  I took a brief look at the BJCP Guidelines and created 10 recipes profiles in beersmith that are Named per the style.  I am now going through and creating Grain and Hop bills according to the descriptions used in the stylebook and staying close to the OG/FG/ABV/SRM/IBU range at the same time.  My plan is to then brew a 5g batch of the .1 version and see if i can identify what i like and dont like about.
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline denny

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2014, 03:21:07 PM »
This describes the thought process I went through when I created my BVIP recipe.

http://digital.ipcprintservices.com/publication/?i=107084
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline Jeff M

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2014, 03:23:51 PM »
This describes the thought process I went through when I created my BVIP recipe.

http://digital.ipcprintservices.com/publication/?i=107084

Seems to be a dead link, doy ou have an issue number? ill go look it up and read it:)
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline garc_mall

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2014, 03:24:42 PM »
want to say it was the May/Jun issue last year. But it is on the cover, so you can look at that.
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2014, 03:32:26 PM »
I start similarly to what you have described. I then read lot's of other recipes and try to get a grasp on the commonalities.

The recipe wiki here on AHA is a good resource for that.

then I apply my own preferences; I tend to reduce bittering charges and crystal malts and tweak for ingredients I can get organically. Often I'll add a little munich.

then experiment.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

Jonathan I Fuller

Offline garc_mall

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2014, 03:34:25 PM »
Designing Great beers by Ray Daniels is a really good resource when you are trying to do a new style. It has some great charts on which malts are used at what rate by how many people. I refer to it a lot when I am attempting a new style.
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison

Offline Jeff M

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2014, 03:40:36 PM »
I am indeed looking at the recipe wiki here, it was just hard to find since the AHA website has changed over.  I am also trying to source all local ingredients when possible as a good hook for my beers.  i have about 8lbs of local whole leaf hops grown about an hour from here.  there is also a maltster near the hop farm that i need to order some grain from and roadtrip out to pick up:)

I also have the Ray Daniels book next to me, ill refer to it after i have my initial notes from the BJCP style guideline to correct mistakes and hopefully refine as version .2 before brewing.
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline denny

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2014, 03:47:44 PM »
want to say it was the May/Jun issue last year. But it is on the cover, so you can look at that.

May/June 2012
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline Jeff M

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2014, 03:49:11 PM »
want to say it was the May/Jun issue last year. But it is on the cover, so you can look at that.

May/June 2012

Ive got it, thanks denny:) reading it now!
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline garc_mall

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2014, 03:49:16 PM »
want to say it was the May/Jun issue last year. But it is on the cover, so you can look at that.

May/June 2012

Yeah... Forgot it was 2014 already...
In a Keg: Flanders Red Ale, Rye Altbier, Cascade/Topaz Pale
Fermenting: Flanders Red, Saison

Offline Jeff M

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2014, 03:50:33 PM »
want to say it was the May/Jun issue last year. But it is on the cover, so you can look at that.

May/June 2012

Yeah... Forgot it was 2014 already...

Me too, where were on the same page!
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

Offline euge

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2014, 03:54:13 PM »
DGB and BJCP. And I almost always follow the same hop schedule regardless of style unless it requires no aroma. What helps is having an example. Preferably more than one. So drink up people.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline goschman

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2014, 03:54:52 PM »
I may not be the best brewer because I tend to brew what I think I will like instead of what are solid, proven styles.

I start by thinking about the finished product and going backward from there. A lot of my beers don't necessarily fit into categories so I don't worry about guidelines much. For example, I might want to brew a Kolsch but hop it up a bit with American style hops as late kettle and dry hop additions...

I am still learning on how to develop recipes over time and that is currently my personal emphasis. I think is about getting as close as you can with the first attempt and changing one thing at a time (if possible) so you can tell if that made the final product better or worse.

Offline Jeff M

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2014, 04:01:49 PM »
I may not be the best brewer because I tend to brew what I think I will like instead of what are solid, proven styles.

I start by thinking about the finished product and going backward from there. A lot of my beers don't necessarily fit into categories so I don't worry about guidelines much. For example, I might want to brew a Kolsch but hop it up a bit with American style hops as late kettle and dry hop additions...

I do agree with this.  If an alteration takes it outside of a Style Guideline i wont mind.  But i am attempting to design beers to eventually sell.  Needless to say people will buy unusual beers as long as they taste great, i just plan to start with usual and expand my portfolio from there:)  it is after all about "knowing your flavor components", right denny?
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2014, 04:52:59 PM »
DGB and BJCP. And I almost always follow the same hop schedule regardless of style unless it requires no aroma. What helps is having an example. Preferably more than one. So drink up people.

+1 to DGB and BJCP Style Guidelines.  Designing Great Beers is a GREAT book with a great approach. You can create a recipe for a style and be able to see what ingredients (and % of each ingredient)  are common in that style. It really helped me get a handle on things across a big range of styles. Learning the attributes of each malt, hop, and yeast will help dial in a recipe, and I learned by changing only one ingredient or variable at a time. Take really clear,thorough, legible notes (including water chemistry)that you can reference. Be sure to add detailed tasting notes - I might not make a style that I brewed last year for another year or two, depending on the style. What was great, good, mediocre, or sh#$$y about it, and what would I change next time? Easiest to assess while you're drinking it than having to try to remember. Good luck.
Jon H.