Author Topic: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process  (Read 965 times)

Offline euge

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #30 on: January 11, 2014, 08:07:41 PM »
Perhaps an updated version needs to be released? I was wondering about DGB relevancy but still consider it as informative go to material but not something to be followed slavishly. One part of the game of Jenga that makes up brewing.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #31 on: January 11, 2014, 08:13:06 PM »
Perhaps an updated version needs to be released? I was wondering about DGB relevancy but still consider it as informative go to material but not something to be followed slavishly. One part of the game of Jenga that makes up brewing.

I guess Ray is doing an update, Euge. Really looking forward to it.
Jon H.

Offline Jeff M

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #32 on: January 11, 2014, 08:51:22 PM »
Thanks for all the replies folks.  IM glad i was facing in the right direction!  Now to just brew some of these recipes and start tweaking....

This may take a while!
Granite Coast Brewing Company.
Building a clone of The Electric Brewery to use as a pilot system for new recipes!

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #33 on: January 11, 2014, 09:01:58 PM »
Perhaps an updated version needs to be released? I was wondering about DGB relevancy but still consider it as informative go to material but not something to be followed slavishly. One part of the game of Jenga that makes up brewing.
So brewing=Jenga? Hmmm... building a tower higher and higher until...the keg kicks. Brilliant!

Offline majorvices

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #34 on: January 12, 2014, 07:12:52 AM »
I often get an idea when out on a walk or a run or other times after tasting or reading. Sometimes even just a name and I decide to match a beer to it. But when I start I usually choose a base malt and decide on a yeast first, then decide what color I want it and choose 2 or 3 specialty malts to go around it. Then I choose hops.

The the hard part starts because it may take me 3 or 4 brews to really dial in what I'm trying to achieve. I usually make several adjustments before I get it where I want it and even then I might continue to make small tweaks from time to time.

IPAs are the hardest in some ways because hops change so much from year to year. Every year when the new crop comes in I have to brew a test batch and see what flavors I am getting off the hops and then I may need to make some changes to the recipe.
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline davidgzach

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Re: How do YOU spitball new recipes? Name your process
« Reply #35 on: January 13, 2014, 06:32:34 AM »
Designing Great beers by Ray Daniels is a really good resource when you are trying to do a new style. It has some great charts on which malts are used at what rate by how many people. I refer to it a lot when I am attempting a new style.

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The problem is that the book is getting long in the tooth.  There are a lot of ingredients that are available now that weren't then, and using these newer ingredients might make a better beer.  As long as you're aware of that and know what to do about it, fine.  But that's one reason a newer version is under way, AFAIK.

Good to hear a newer version is coming.  What I like about DGB is the history portion and charts which allow me to take a holistic approach when brewing a new style and understand the "why" as well as the "how".
Dave Zach