Author Topic: Adding java to a stout  (Read 3704 times)

Offline Jimmy K

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #30 on: February 25, 2014, 02:36:54 PM »
  As an aside, does anyone else think coffee beers sometimes taste more like green bell peppers than coffee?
I hope you're not saying your coffee beer tastes like green bell peppers, because that would contradict your first statement that hot steeped coffee is fine.
 
I haven't thought of green peppers from any coffee beer I've had.
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #31 on: February 25, 2014, 02:42:00 PM »
When I worked at a coffee shop in college, we had a few varieties that had hints of bell pepper. I think it was the African and Indonesian beans. I would try a different bean. 

Offline krebsy

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #32 on: February 25, 2014, 03:20:02 PM »
I did not notice the bell pepper character in the beer I made, but I have noticed it in some others that I know were made with beans steeped in the beer post fermentation.  My suspicion is that it is certain beans or roast levels, or just how my senses interpret it sometimes.

Offline Jimmy K

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #33 on: February 25, 2014, 03:30:22 PM »
Hmm, that's interesting.
 
Also, how do you chill? I would think that throwing beans in at flameout would be fine if you can cool quickly. Not so good if the wort will be hot for an extended time.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #34 on: February 25, 2014, 03:32:34 PM »
One of my favorite coffees to use is Sumatra, obviously from Indonesia. I've never picked up on the bell pepper thing. Maybe the differences in each roaster.
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #35 on: February 25, 2014, 04:48:18 PM »
One of my clubmates, Sandy Cockerham, is a BJCP Master and owner of a local coffee shop. She also supplies the coffee to many of the Indy breweries and guides their practices. Cold beer steeping seems to be the direction she espouses.

In a recent brewery's rendition of a coffee beer, there was definite bell/hot pepper notes. I seem to recall they used a Guatemalan bean. Of course Sandy roasted the beans, but I don't remember how dark. I also recall a presentation she gave to our BJCP judge pool in which she worked with SunKing and their Cream Ale and infused some lightly roasted (Ethiopian?) coffee and the result was surprisingly refreshing and light.   
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Offline chezteth

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #36 on: February 25, 2014, 05:23:17 PM »
I have picked up green bell pepper / vegetal notes in some coffee beers. I agree it could be the bean variety. It could also be from using cheap or stale coffee.

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #37 on: February 25, 2014, 05:36:38 PM »
I just bought some Kona medium roast. I plan to add  4oz fresh ground to the keg prior to kegging and let it steep at cellar temp for 7 days. I like the whole bean idea too.

Thanks for all of the ideas and suggestions. Keep the suggestions/discussion coming! :)

I added 4oz of fresh ground Kona coffee before racking into the keg. I allowed the fresh ground coffee to steep for 5 days in the kegged beer, and then pulled the muslin bag from the keg. There is a prominant yet moderately balanced level of fresh coffee aroma and flavor in the Oatmeal stout. The coffee seems to meld with the stout flavor as it ages. I want to try some cocoa nibs with the coffee next time around.

Fresh ground coffee cold steeped in the keg works well.  :)
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #38 on: February 25, 2014, 05:39:46 PM »
I just bought some Kona medium roast. I plan to add  4oz fresh ground to the keg prior to kegging and let it steep at cellar temp for 7 days. I like the whole bean idea too.

Thanks for all of the ideas and suggestions. Keep the suggestions/discussion coming! :)



Fresh ground coffee cold steeped in the keg works well.  :)

+1. Sure does.
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Offline krebsy

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #39 on: February 26, 2014, 02:18:24 PM »
Hmm, that's interesting.
 
Also, how do you chill? I would think that throwing beans in at flameout would be fine if you can cool quickly. Not so good if the wort will be hot for an extended time.

Immersion chiller.

Offline Jimmy K

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Re: Adding java to a stout
« Reply #40 on: February 26, 2014, 02:35:09 PM »
Hmm, that's interesting.
 
Also, how do you chill? I would think that throwing beans in at flameout would be fine if you can cool quickly. Not so good if the wort will be hot for an extended time.

Immersion chiller.
Makes sense. Quick chill = no burnt coffee flavor.
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