Author Topic: sediment in bottom of bottles  (Read 402 times)

Offline bwuller

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sediment in bottom of bottles
« on: January 15, 2014, 07:37:38 PM »
After letting the bottles condition there is some sediment on the bottom of the bottles and wanted to know what I did wrong and if there is a way to limit or eliminate the sediment.  Thanks for the help. 
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Offline yso191

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Re: sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2014, 07:41:53 PM »
That is normal.  Some people with some styles want the yeast so much that they swirl the last bit and evenly distribute it between glasses so everyone gets an equal amount.

If you are concerned about it you can decant the beer (pour carefully without agitating the yeast, and stop short of pouring the last bit out which contains the bulk of the yeast).  Or you'll have to force carbonate your beer.
Steve

Offline hokerer

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Re: sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2014, 08:23:01 PM »
Yep, perfectly normal for bottle conditioned beer.
Joe

cornershot

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Re: sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2014, 05:04:25 AM »
A layer of sediment in bottle conditioned beer is normal, but it should be minimal. Examine the sediment layer in a bottle conditioned commercial beer like Sierra Nevada and you'll see that it's quite thin. If yours is much more than that, you either sucked sediment from the bottom of your fermenter when racking or you didn't give the beer enough time to clear after fermentation.
Some other post fermentation steps you can take to minimize sediment are:
1. Crash cooling. If you have a way to chill the entire fermenter, this will cause the yeast to settle out.
2. Lagering. Like cold crashing but for a much longer time.
3. Finings like gelatin will make the yeast clump together and drop out.
4. Filtering. If you do this you'll have to add bottling yeast.
All that said, if you pour the beer in a glass in one smooth pour, without sloshing back and forth, and leave the last 1/4" of beer behind, you should get minimal sediment. You can just pour it out and drink it too. But your beer will taste yeasty and it will make you fart a lot.

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Offline corkybstewart

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Re: sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2014, 10:07:32 AM »
There is really no way around it if you bottle condition(add priming sugar).  The sediment is the result of the yeast eating the priming sugar and creating CO2 in the bottle.  Just pour gently and leave 1/4 inch of beer in the bottle and you'll never notice it. 
Many commercial Belgian beers are bottle conditioned and have this same sediment, it's just a normal condition.
I'd really just rather be brewing in sunny Carlsbad New Mexico

Offline Steve in TX

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Re: sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2014, 10:11:03 AM »
The trick is the single pouring motion. I drink the whole bottle this way and very little yeast ends up in the glass.

If you put the beer in the fridge when it is done conditioning and leave it there for a week or two, the sediment compacts more and it is easier to avoid it. Some yeasts are more of a PIA than others.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2014, 10:19:58 AM »
Theoretically, the number of yeast cells needed to be present to carbonate the beer is pretty low which is how some of the commercial breweries can do it and have such minimal sediment.  Where the threshold between just right and not enough lies, I have no idea.

When bottle conditioning I'd rather have a little more sediment than flat beer.

There are also yeasts intended/marketed for bottle conditioning that supposedly form a more compact layer and are not as easily disturbed.  One of the dry yeast manufacturers (Frementis?) markets a yeast for this.  I have no experience with it, but I imagine you'd want to cold crash, fine, and then add the bottling yeast to the bottling bucket with your priming sugar.
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Offline alestateyall

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sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2014, 11:10:08 AM »
I pour about 10oz into the glass then drink the other 2 from the bottle. The glass looks pretty and you can't taste the sediment from the 2 oz in the bottle.

Really though I keg so sediment is a non issue for my homebrew. Just a problem with some store bought bottle conditioned beers and other homebrewer's beers.

Offline bwuller

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Re: sediment in bottom of bottles
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2014, 02:58:58 PM »
Thanks for all the feedback. It was just my first brew and wanted to make sure that it was normal and that I didn't completely mess it up.

Brad
St. Louis,MO

"An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools."
-Ernest Hemmingway