Author Topic: Starter Timing  (Read 410 times)

Offline In The Sand

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Starter Timing
« on: January 16, 2014, 09:06:26 AM »
I know there are two schools of thought on when to pitch starters, but for the sake of this topic I want to pitch my starter when it is at high kraeusen.  I'm using two new vials of WLP001 to pitch into a 1.066 IPA (slightly underpitching I know, but I don't have a large enough flask to do bigger and don't want to buy another vial of yeast).  I plan to make the starter using 200 grams of DME to equal a 2 Liter starter.  Starter will be on a stir plate at around 67*F temperatures.  Do you think it will be at high kraeusen within 24 hours?  I use this technique from JZ's Yeast book.

EDIT:  And will it have enough time in 24 hrs to reproduce to close to the amount of yeast I'll need?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2014, 09:19:26 AM by In The Sand »
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Offline Steve in TX

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2014, 09:28:14 AM »
When I do it the way you are proposing, I make the starter late into the evening the night before and pitch in the early evening the next day. So I guess it would be between 16-20 hours.

Offline a10t2

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2014, 12:46:11 PM »
If the vials are fresh, you don't really need to increase cell count. Assuming this is a 5-6 gal batch, you'd want around 250 billion cells versus around 200 billion in two vials.

To activate the yeast, I'd just boil and chill a liter or so of tail runnings and get that on the stir plate until you're ready to pitch.
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Offline In The Sand

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2014, 01:12:30 PM »
If the vials are fresh, you don't really need to increase cell count. Assuming this is a 5-6 gal batch, you'd want around 250 billion cells versus around 200 billion in two vials.

To activate the yeast, I'd just boil and chill a liter or so of tail runnings and get that on the stir plate until you're ready to pitch.

It is a 11-ish gallon batch.  I plan 12 to account for what the hops soak up, OG sample, and what we run off out of the lines with sanitizer.

The vials will be in today so I'm sure they're fresh.
Trey W.

Offline mtnrockhopper

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2014, 01:30:46 PM »
EDIT:  And will it have enough time in 24 hrs to reproduce to close to the amount of yeast I'll need?
24 hours on a stir plate should get you close. MrMalty recommends 2 vials into 2.5L starter for 11G.
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Offline In The Sand

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2014, 03:12:04 PM »
It was at high kraeusen at about 15 hrs. Perfect for when I wanted to pitch. However something weird happened that hasn't happened to me before. I have a 2L flask and I usually just put foil loosely on top. Well it blew out the top. Does that mean my stir plate wasn't working properly or maybe the stir bar wasn't in the right spot?
Trey W.

Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2014, 05:17:25 AM »
WLP001 is a very vigorous fermenter.
Occaisionally, I've had the same result with 2L of starter in a 2L flask.
Some stir plates generate heat which warms the wort and that just increases the possibility that the wort will "boil" over. In this case, I found that a silicone pad between the stir plate and the flask will help.


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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2014, 05:42:43 AM »
You really need some headspace.  I use a 2 gallon pail with lid and airlock for lager starters or larger starters or I will brew a smallish lightly hopped beer with the yeast straight up then harvest the yeast for the bigger batch.  Then brew with the same yeast based on the timing of the batches (rotating through different beers and yeasts to avoid the need to make a lot of starters.)
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Offline scottNU

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2014, 07:55:17 AM »
I use a 2 gallon pail with lid and airlock for lager starters or larger starters

That's a really good idea.  I wondered if people with large starters (> 2L) were using really big Erlenmeyer flasks and how they managed that much volume.  Thanks for the idea.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2014, 08:00:24 AM »
I use a 2 gallon pail with lid and airlock for lager starters or larger starters

That's a really good idea.  I wondered if people with large starters (> 2L) were using really big Erlenmeyer flasks and how they managed that much volume.  Thanks for the idea.

I have 2 5 liter Erlenmeyer flasks for big starters. For 10 gallons of Pilsner I have 12 liters of WLP-830 ready to go right now.
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Offline mtnrockhopper

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2014, 08:02:16 AM »
I use a 2 gallon pail with lid and airlock for lager starters or larger starters

That's a really good idea.  I wondered if people with large starters (> 2L) were using really big Erlenmeyer flasks and how they managed that much volume.  Thanks for the idea.
I've also seen people use gallon glass jugs for starters.
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Offline AmandaK

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2014, 08:26:15 AM »
I use a 2 gallon pail with lid and airlock for lager starters or larger starters

That's a really good idea.  I wondered if people with large starters (> 2L) were using really big Erlenmeyer flasks and how they managed that much volume.  Thanks for the idea.
I've also seen people use gallon glass jugs for starters.

Yep. A lot of people around this area dig them out of Ripple Glass for free. (Ripple Glass is Boulevard's glass recycling program for KC.)
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Offline Pinski

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Re: Starter Timing
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2014, 10:17:02 AM »
Add a few drops of fermcap to your flask and you can get away with making a full volume starter having relatively little headspace even with the most vigorous of yeasts.
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