Author Topic: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?  (Read 525 times)

Offline Jeff M

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2014, 01:15:50 PM »
I wouldnt add yeast nutrients during the boil.  Ive smelled that stuff and wouldnt want it cooked into my wort.  not sure if it would happen or not, but id avoid it.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2014, 01:19:45 PM »
I wouldnt add yeast nutrients during the boil.  Ive smelled that stuff and wouldnt want it cooked into my wort.  not sure if it would happen or not, but id avoid it.

Yeast nutrient in the boil is not a problem.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2014, 01:24:38 PM »
Aerate the wort before adding yeast to promote healthy fermention. There are various methods. Rock the fermenter back and forth, stir vigorously if it's in a bucket, inject air with an aquarium pump if you're higher tech, or use an O2 tank if you're really slick.


Gotcha, I do that a couple ways: 1) pouring it fast, and 2) shaking the living crap out of it once I get the lid on ;D.  No fancy tech here, just me and a carboy!

On that side burner issue - make sure the burner structure can handle the weight of 8 gallons plus the pot (approaching 70 pounds total, if not more).  Just would hate to see a collapse of the cart....not trying to scare you.

I actually already thought of that, but I haven't tested the strength of it.  Quite honestly, I don't think the flame will be hot enough to do the job.  We have one burner on our kitchen stove that is pretty impressive, so I'll probably just do it inside until I can afford a backyard burner.  Got my eye on one for $40 that puts out 55,000 BTUs but picking a burner is a completely different post.

Can you check mash pH? Some of us do.

I've thought about it, but quite honestly I've never had any issues in all the years I've brewed to warrant it.  Of course I've only done extract brews, so maybe an all grain batch is more sensitive to water ph levels ... but my mentor taught me to "relax ... have a home brew"  ;)

For a beer this big, your yeast is going to need some added yeast nutrients.  You can put a heaping tablespoon of spent yeast into the boil to provide all the nutrients needed.

Great advice, I do believe the recipe calls for yeast nutrients 3 days into the primary fermentation.  Do you think that adding it during the boil will make that unnecessary?

Thanks again everyone!

Measuring mash pH is important, as the mash works best in a range from 5.2-5.6 or there abouts. If you want to get serious about all grain, at least get some pH strips (which have a bias that you need to be aware of).

https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/water-knowledge
Jeff Rankert
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Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2014, 01:28:29 PM »
I wouldnt add yeast nutrients during the boil.  Ive smelled that stuff and wouldnt want it cooked into my wort.  not sure if it would happen or not, but id avoid it.

Yeast nutrient in the boil is not a problem.

+1.  Wyeast recommends theirs @ 10 minutes left. It's what I do.



EDIT -      http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_productdetail.cfm?ProductID=15
« Last Edit: February 01, 2014, 01:30:54 PM by HoosierBrew »
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Offline Jeff M

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2014, 01:34:49 PM »
good to know!
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Offline garc_mall

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2014, 03:09:20 PM »
I wouldnt add yeast nutrients during the boil.  Ive smelled that stuff and wouldnt want it cooked into my wort.  not sure if it would happen or not, but id avoid it.

Yeast nutrient in the boil is not a problem.

That smell is the stuff you don't want in your beer volatilizing off. The Ammonia is used as a source of Nitrogen to help the yeast grow new cell walls.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2014, 05:21:28 PM »
Aerate the wort before adding yeast to promote healthy fermention. There are various methods. Rock the fermenter back and forth, stir vigorously if it's in a bucket, inject air with an aquarium pump if you're higher tech, or use an O2 tank if you're really slick.


Gotcha, I do that a couple ways: 1) pouring it fast, and 2) shaking the living crap out of it once I get the lid on ;D.  No fancy tech here, just me and a carboy!

On that side burner issue - make sure the burner structure can handle the weight of 8 gallons plus the pot (approaching 70 pounds total, if not more).  Just would hate to see a collapse of the cart....not trying to scare you.

I actually already thought of that, but I haven't tested the strength of it.  Quite honestly, I don't think the flame will be hot enough to do the job.  We have one burner on our kitchen stove that is pretty impressive, so I'll probably just do it inside until I can afford a backyard burner.  Got my eye on one for $40 that puts out 55,000 BTUs but picking a burner is a completely different post.

Can you check mash pH? Some of us do.

I've thought about it, but quite honestly I've never had any issues in all the years I've brewed to warrant it.  Of course I've only done extract brews, so maybe an all grain batch is more sensitive to water ph levels ... but my mentor taught me to "relax ... have a home brew"  ;)

For a beer this big, your yeast is going to need some added yeast nutrients.  You can put a heaping tablespoon of spent yeast into the boil to provide all the nutrients needed.

Great advice, I do believe the recipe calls for yeast nutrients 3 days into the primary fermentation.  Do you think that adding it during the boil will make that unnecessary?

Thanks again everyone!

Measuring mash pH is important, as the mash works best in a range from 5.2-5.6 or there abouts. If you want to get serious about all grain, at least get some pH strips (which have a bias that you need to be aware of).

https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/water-knowledge

+1 to mash pH being important. Not to say you can't still relax and have a homebrew but it's helpful to st least have an understanding of pH and how it can affect your beer. When you are using extract the brewer who made the extract paid close attention to mash pH to be sure.

I go the lazy route and start with RO our distilled water and follow bru'n water. I have yet to have a problem that way
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time" - A. Einstein

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2014, 05:43:40 PM »
+1.  I resisted getting a handle on pH for my first couple AG brewing years, and no surprise my results were spotty. Some styles came out great (blind luck), some not so. Bru'nWater is fantastic -if you invest in a 100g scale (or similar) and weigh out your water salts according to the software you'll be thrilled with the results. I honestly think it's better to stick with extract/steeped grain brewing than to brew AG and ignore pH. Just my $0.02


EDIT - http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Signature-AWS-100-Digital/dp/B0012LOQUQ

          This is the scale I use. Great for hops and water salts. Very affordable.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2014, 05:47:29 PM by HoosierBrew »
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Offline ranchovillabrew

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2014, 07:50:32 PM »
I started measuring pH when I went to all grain.  I don't adjust my water much yet. However,  I wanted to have good notes for when I'm ready to dive into tinkering with water.  I have pretty hard water though. 

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Offline ranchovillabrew

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Re: First All Grain Brew ... Advice?
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2014, 07:51:40 PM »
Also I add yeast nutrient at the same time I put my immersion chiller in and add irish moss. 15 minutes to go.

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