Author Topic: Belgian Blond  (Read 462 times)

Online goschman

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Belgian Blond
« on: February 10, 2014, 05:23:04 PM »
Never brewed one. Thinking about doing one instead of a Saison this Spring. From the little research I did, this is what I came up with. I realize I could be way off...

90% Pils
6% cane sugar
4% aromatic
14 g Magnum 60 min
14 g Willamette 5 min
3522 Belgian Ardennes Yeast

OG 1.064
IBU 23.4
ABV 6.8% (based on 80% attenuation and FG of 1.012)

First off, I know the Willamette is out of place but would it be "okay"? I don't really want to buy hops that I won't use. What changes should I make? Mash temp?

Online HoosierBrew

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2014, 05:29:40 PM »
All in all, pretty solid. Not too far off my last one actually ( I might have used a little more cane sugar). I mash a Blond ~ 150F. Great yeast choice ! I think you'll be happy.
Jon H.

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2014, 05:34:24 PM »
All in all, pretty solid. Not too far off my last one actually ( I might have used a little more cane sugar). I mash a Blond ~ 150F. Great yeast choice ! I think you'll be happy.

What temp do you recommend running that yeast at? I assume more phenolics at higher temps?

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2014, 05:35:33 PM »
Willamette is my default nobilish hop. I bought 2 lbs 2 seasons ago and use it in everything from English to German.

Mashing low is a good plan.

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2014, 05:49:20 PM »
All in all, pretty solid. Not too far off my last one actually ( I might have used a little more cane sugar). I mash a Blond ~ 150F. Great yeast choice ! I think you'll be happy.

What temp do you recommend running that yeast at? I assume more phenolics at higher temps?

I think I pitched @ ~ 65F and slowly ramped up to the upper 70s after a couple days. It's my favorite yeast for Blond. Good stuff.
Jon H.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2014, 08:56:58 PM »
I think Willamette would be fine here, but tastes vary. Frankly, there's no reason you have to use a finishing hop in this style, so you could always skip it if you're worried about that.

Otherwise, the recipe looks pretty nice to me. Agreed on the low-150's for a mash temp, too.
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Offline euge

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2014, 10:33:13 PM »
Did you get much phenol character? Per my tastes it can be a defect if too upfront.
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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2014, 09:36:07 AM »
I think I will take out the late hop addition. At this point I guess I am bit confused between the differences between a Blond and a Saison. Is it mainly the yeast? I am still acquiring a taste for Belgian beers and definitely prefer the lighter colored styles at this point.

The recipe is looking very similar to my Saison except that has some wheat and munich instead of the aromatic. I honestly don't know which one I would prefer at this point. I do like dry beers so maybe I go the Saison route...ugh

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2014, 09:40:12 AM »
I think I will take out the late hop addition. At this point I guess I am bit confused between the differences between a Blond and a Saison. Is it mainly the yeast? I am still acquiring a taste for Belgian beers and definitely prefer the lighter colored styles at this point.

The recipe is looking very similar to my Saison except that has some wheat and munich instead of the aromatic. I honestly don't know which one I would prefer at this point. I do like dry beers so maybe I go the Saison route...ugh

to me the big difference between a belgian blonde and a saison is a) the yeast and b) the use of unmalted adjuncts in a saison (other than sugar)
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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2014, 09:47:33 AM »
I think I will take out the late hop addition. At this point I guess I am bit confused between the differences between a Blond and a Saison. Is it mainly the yeast? I am still acquiring a taste for Belgian beers and definitely prefer the lighter colored styles at this point.

The recipe is looking very similar to my Saison except that has some wheat and munich instead of the aromatic. I honestly don't know which one I would prefer at this point. I do like dry beers so maybe I go the Saison route...ugh

to me the big difference between a belgian blonde and a saison is a) the yeast and b) the use of unmalted adjuncts in a saison (other than sugar)

Thanks Mort. Other than being more attenuative, does the Saison yeast have more phenols and flavor characteristics in general?

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2014, 09:55:28 AM »
I think I will take out the late hop addition. At this point I guess I am bit confused between the differences between a Blond and a Saison. Is it mainly the yeast? I am still acquiring a taste for Belgian beers and definitely prefer the lighter colored styles at this point.

The recipe is looking very similar to my Saison except that has some wheat and munich instead of the aromatic. I honestly don't know which one I would prefer at this point. I do like dry beers so maybe I go the Saison route...ugh

to me the big difference between a belgian blonde and a saison is a) the yeast and b) the use of unmalted adjuncts in a saison (other than sugar)

Thanks Mort. Other than being more attenuative, does the Saison yeast have more phenols and flavor characteristics in general?

Yeah, Saison strains are unique - tart, fruity, peppery. VERY attenuative while leaving a nice amount of body for the FG.
Jon H.

Offline Siamese Moose

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2014, 10:09:33 AM »
I've had a couple BOS beers with Belgian Blond, and your recipe is very close to mine (I use 10% sugar). Your target of 23 ibu's is good, but if you err, go lower. When my ibu's got to 25 it really affected the beer's score.

I also use 3522. My fermentation schedule is to start it at 62°, and let it free rise to the mid-70°s. I just try to make sure it doesn't cross 70° in the first 48 hours, or the phenols get a little too strong. If it stays cold too long it lacks the esters that I really like. I also prefer mine quite dry, so I mash at 147-8°, and it finishes around 1.008.
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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2014, 10:24:37 AM »
I've had a couple BOS beers with Belgian Blond, and your recipe is very close to mine (I use 10% sugar). Your target of 23 ibu's is good, but if you err, go lower. When my ibu's got to 25 it really affected the beer's score.

I also use 3522. My fermentation schedule is to start it at 62°, and let it free rise to the mid-70°s. I just try to make sure it doesn't cross 70° in the first 48 hours, or the phenols get a little too strong. If it stays cold too long it lacks the esters that I really like. I also prefer mine quite dry, so I mash at 147-8°, and it finishes around 1.008.

Awesome! Thanks for the pointers and the warning on IBUs. I was actually going to push mine closer to the upper limits of the guidelines so it is good to know to keep it lower.

I prefer a more mellow belgian quality so maybe I go with the Blond and ferment a bit cooler?

Offline Siamese Moose

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2014, 07:35:34 AM »
I prefer a more mellow belgian quality so maybe I go with the Blond and ferment a bit cooler?

Exactly right!
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Offline chumley

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Re: Belgian Blond
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2014, 09:29:02 AM »
For another opinion, I would bump up the flavor/aroma hops. Use those Willamettes at flameout as well. Belgian brewers don't follow silly BJCP style guidelines.  ;)

I am planning a Belgian blond myself, this weekend.  I am emulating Bink, a hoppy Belgian blond that is pretty tasty.

FWIW, I am aiming for 1.055 OG, 30 IBUs, Challenger/EKGs for bittering, Styrians for a 10 minute addition, and Saaz at flameout. Using a 50/50 mix of Best Pilsner and Malteurop 2-row, and the White Labs Belgian yeast blend for one fermenter, Chimay yeast for the second (10 gallon batch).