Author Topic: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.  (Read 1719 times)

Offline Steve L

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Hi all. I'm an all grain brewer and I pretty much always get some chill haze in varying degrees. I typically do about a one hour mash then batch sparge. My efficiency runs between 75and 80% and I almost always either hit my OG or a little higher than my recipe calls for so it seems like I'm getting good conversion.

My chill hazed beers always precipitate out in the fridge after a few weeks so it's not a big concern but for competitions I feel like I may be going past the best flavor time while I'm getting the haze to settle. I batch prime and bottle as we'll, no room for kegs.

I typically do a 60 minute boil (90 with a pils base malt). Would a longer boil time be more likely to help the problem or a longer mash? I usually add my bittering hops as soon as it begins to boil and the hot break falls. I've been contemplating doing a 90 minute boil regardless of base malt.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2014, 02:47:14 PM by swlusk »
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Offline fmader

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2014, 02:52:18 PM »
Start simple... Add a whirlfloc tab to the boil for the last 10 minutes. Cheap and easy!
Frank

Offline Steve L

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2014, 03:00:51 PM »
Start simple... Add a whirlfloc tab to the boil for the last 10 minutes. Cheap and easy!
Oops...  Forgot to mention that I do indeed use whirlfloc in my boils. I do 2.5 gallon half batches so I use a half of a whirlfloc tablet.
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Offline fmader

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2014, 03:02:08 PM »
Start simple... Add a whirlfloc tab to the boil for the last 10 minutes. Cheap and easy!
Oops...  Forgot to mention that I do indeed use whirlfloc in my boils. I do 2.5 gallon half batches so I use a half of a whirlfloc tablet.

Ok then... Let somebody more educated than me weigh in  :P
Frank

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2014, 03:40:39 PM »
Maintaining good pH control in AG beers is important to clarity, for starters. Whirlfloc (which you use) is pretty effective for me. Keep in mind that chill haze is a different thing from yeast induced haze. A beer that is otherwise clear might have some chill haze when poured , then clear up after warming up for a couple minutes. However yeast that is still in suspension will cause prolonged haze until it falls to the bottom, some strains quicker than others. Gelatin is pretty effective for this, as is cold crashing @ near 32F for a couple days. If you already cold crash I recommend using gelatin. This site has a simple explanation of using gelatin - it works nicely. Also, watch that pH. Good luck !

http://www.bertusbrewery.com/2012/06/how-to-clear-your-beer-with-gelatin.html
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Offline denny

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2014, 04:44:13 PM »
Start simple... Add a whirlfloc tab to the boil for the last 10 minutes. Cheap and easy!

The tabs are for 12 gal. batches, so 1/2 tab is enough for 5 gal.
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Offline Steve L

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2014, 05:31:28 PM »
Maintaining good pH control in AG beers is important to clarity, for starters. Whirlfloc (which you use) is pretty effective for me. Keep in mind that chill haze is a different thing from yeast induced haze. A beer that is otherwise clear might have some chill haze when poured , then clear up after warming up for a couple minutes. However yeast that is still in suspension will cause prolonged haze until it falls to the bottom, some strains quicker than others. Gelatin is pretty effective for this, as is cold crashing @ near 32F for a couple days. If you already cold crash I recommend using gelatin. This site has a simple explanation of using gelatin - it works nicely. Also, watch that pH. Good luck !

http://www.bertusbrewery.com/2012/06/how-to-clear-your-beer-with-gelatin.html
Great article, the gelatin sounds like a great solution.  Thanks for the reply. I do wonder about one thing in regard to cold crashing. If I plan to rinse the yeast cake, should I cold crash or slowly reduce the temps over several days? Will the slow temp drop work the same as cold crashing?  I've read that some believe cold crashing can shock the yeast and it's not recommended if you plan to rinse and repitch.

Quote
The tabs are for 12 gal. batches, so 1/2 tab is enough for 5 gal.
Looks like I've already been doubling up on the Whirlfloc in my 2.5 gallon batches. I'm thinking I might try a 1/4 tab :)
« Last Edit: February 23, 2014, 05:33:15 PM by swlusk »
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Offline majorvices

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2014, 06:08:36 PM »
Yes, pH is hugely important if you want clear beer. Try the colorpHast pH strips to start. They are fairly accurate.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2014, 06:19:56 PM »
Maintaining good pH control in AG beers is important to clarity, for starters. Whirlfloc (which you use) is pretty effective for me. Keep in mind that chill haze is a different thing from yeast induced haze. A beer that is otherwise clear might have some chill haze when poured , then clear up after warming up for a couple minutes. However yeast that is still in suspension will cause prolonged haze until it falls to the bottom, some strains quicker than others. Gelatin is pretty effective for this, as is cold crashing @ near 32F for a couple days. If you already cold crash I recommend using gelatin. This site has a simple explanation of using gelatin - it works nicely. Also, watch that pH. Good luck !

http://www.bertusbrewery.com/2012/06/how-to-clear-your-beer-with-gelatin.html
Great article, the gelatin sounds like a great solution.  Thanks for the reply. I do wonder about one thing in regard to cold crashing. If I plan to rinse the yeast cake, should I cold crash or slowly reduce the temps over several days? Will the slow temp drop work the same as cold crashing?  I've read that some believe cold crashing can shock the yeast and it's not recommended if you plan to rinse and repitch.




You can reuse yeast after crashing. I let it warm a bit before reusing , but it works just fine.
Jon H.

Offline Steve L

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2014, 07:48:06 PM »
Excellent. Thanks for all the replies. One other question. I have about another week before bottling a Southern English brown ale that I fermented with WLP002. o you think it would be over kill to use gelatin on a reportedly very High flocculating yeast?
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Offline AmandaK

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2014, 07:54:44 PM »
Usually, chill haze is caused by insufficient conversion time. Have you been checking for conversion before you sparge?
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2014, 08:02:34 PM »
Excellent. Thanks for all the replies. One other question. I have about another week before bottling a Southern English brown ale that I fermented with WLP002. o you think it would be over kill to use gelatin on a reportedly very High flocculating yeast?

I think you should be fine, assuming your pH was good and,as Amanda said, you got good conversion. WLP002 normally falls pretty clear, pretty quickly.
Jon H.

Offline Steve L

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2014, 08:13:39 PM »
Usually, chill haze is caused by insufficient conversion time. Have you been checking for conversion before you sparge?
Typically I use brewers friend to calculate my water adjustment and PH range for the beer I'm brewing. I test about 10 minutes into my mash with precision labs pH 4662 strips that my LHBS sells. I'm always in the right ballpark according to the strip reading but I know they aren't going to be as accurate as a meter.

Quote
I think you should be fine, assuming your pH was good and,as Amanda said, you got good conversion. WLP002 normally falls pretty clear, pretty quickly.
Very good. This is my first use of WLP002, I'm anxious to see the results. :D
« Last Edit: February 23, 2014, 08:15:33 PM by swlusk »
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Offline AmandaK

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2014, 08:16:27 PM »
Usually, chill haze is caused by insufficient conversion time. Have you been checking for conversion before you sparge?
Typically I use brewers friend to calculate my water adjustment and PH range for the beer I'm brewing. I test about 10 minutes into my mash with precision labs pH 4662 strips that my LHBS sells. I'm always in the right ballpark according to the strip reading but I know they aren't going to be as accurate as a meter.

I didn't mean for you to check pH. I meant for you to check the actual conversion. e.g. an iodine test. If that is negative, then you know your conversion is the issue that needs working on.
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Offline Steve L

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Re: What would be the first step in ferreting out a chill haze problem.
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2014, 08:25:58 PM »
Usually, chill haze is caused by insufficient conversion time. Have you been checking for conversion before you sparge?
Typically I use brewers friend to calculate my water adjustment and PH range for the beer I'm brewing. I test about 10 minutes into my mash with precision labs pH 4662 strips that my LHBS sells. I'm always in the right ballpark according to the strip reading but I know they aren't going to be as accurate as a meter.

I didn't mean for you to check pH. I meant for you to check the actual conversion. e.g. an iodine test. If that is negative, then you know your conversion is the issue that needs working on.

Ah... I do use the iodine test at the 1 hour mark and use that as my marker for conversion. After reading your post, I went out and looked at a few videos of people performing an iodine conversion test, and I have to admit, it's possible that I am a bit short of full conversion. I'm planning a brew day in a week, I'm going to CLOSELY monitor my mash conversion. Thanks, again for the help. :D
« Last Edit: February 23, 2014, 08:38:00 PM by swlusk »
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