Author Topic: Best options for scaling recipes?  (Read 820 times)

Offline dzlater

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
  • Dan S. New Jersey
    • View Profile
Re: Best options for scaling recipes?
« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2014, 04:34:33 PM »
I'm not trying to be a smartass but instead of scaling the recipe with the software, why don't you just set the software for a three gallon batch , and divide the recipe in half?
Dan S. from NJ

Online HoosierBrew

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6806
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Best options for scaling recipes?
« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2014, 04:44:36 PM »
FWIW, I brew 3-gallon all-grain recipes myself, and I adapt recipes from BCS all the time. I use Brewers Friend and the recipe-scaling functionality is pretty good and robust. Basically, all the grains would remain the same by percent of the recipe. The only time I would adjust the base grains and specialty grains of a recipe by different percentages is if I was taking an existing recipe and either Imperializing or Sessionizing it. If the only difference is the batch size, then all the grains scale by the same amount.

Agree totally. I don't like to deviate from the percentages unless it's a session or imperial.
Jon H.

Offline el_capitan

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 229
    • View Profile
Re: Best options for scaling recipes?
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2014, 09:17:07 AM »
To the OP - like you, I'm using BrewMate to scale back many of the BCS recipes from 6 to 3 gallons.  I haven't had any problems going this route at all.  I've brewed 8 batches that way and they've been awesome so far.

I think the problem lies with either your personal expectations of the style, or something within the brewing process.  If your beer is too thin and lacking character, I'd take a close look at your mash temps.  Consider mashing a bit higher to increase body and decrease wort fermentability.  It could also be a yeast factor.  You might consider a different strain that will increase body and amp up the malt character (WY1450 comes to mind).

Also, keep an eye on pitching rate with the 3-gallon batches.  I think overpitching can increase attenuation a bit (although that's strictly a gut feeling at this point - I have no data to support it). 

Offline Brewtweak

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 325
  • Rocky Mount, VA
    • View Profile
Re: Best options for scaling recipes?
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2014, 07:59:52 AM »
To the OP - like you, I'm using BrewMate to scale back many of the BCS recipes from 6 to 3 gallons.  I haven't had any problems going this route at all.  I've brewed 8 batches that way and they've been awesome so far.

I think the problem lies with either your personal expectations of the style, or something within the brewing process.  If your beer is too thin and lacking character, I'd take a close look at your mash temps.  Consider mashing a bit higher to increase body and decrease wort fermentability.  It could also be a yeast factor.  You might consider a different strain that will increase body and amp up the malt character (WY1450 comes to mind).

Also, keep an eye on pitching rate with the 3-gallon batches.  I think overpitching can increase attenuation a bit (although that's strictly a gut feeling at this point - I have no data to support it).
All great points! I'm beginning to think that it is indeed my impression of the beer and not the recipe. The commercial examples I'm "comparing" my brew to are not designed or brewed for a competition so they have not interest in brewing to strictly to style but more for taste. If I'm brewing according to recipes made to represent specific styles, the most may very well be different. I think it's inexperience on my part.
Corripe Cervisiam

If I ever go missing I want my picture on a beer instead of a milk carton , I want fun people to find me