Author Topic: thick creamy head  (Read 975 times)

Offline sheets

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thick creamy head
« on: April 02, 2010, 05:37:51 PM »
I'm trying to replicate a boddingtons-like ale  and i was wondering how i could achieve that great thick creamy head without a nitrogen ball or widget. i was thinking of adding gypsum to replicate the calcium-rich water on that side of the pond and also lactose in hopes that it'll at least add some extra body and smooth mouthfeel if it doesnt give me the head I'm looking for. any suggestions?

Offline denny

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Re: thick creamy head
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2010, 05:45:34 PM »
I'm trying to replicate a boddingtons-like ale  and i was wondering how i could achieve that great thick creamy head without a nitrogen ball or widget. i was thinking of adding gypsum to replicate the calcium-rich water on that side of the pond and also lactose in hopes that it'll at least add some extra body and smooth mouthfeel if it doesnt give me the head I'm looking for. any suggestions?

One of the things that gives the smooth mouthfeel is actually a low carbonation level.  The nitrogen helps that by making sure the beer pours with so much force that it knocks some of the carbonation out of it.  Same thing with the nitro pour for Guinness.  Years ago, Guinness came with a syringe so you could suck up some beer and shoot it back into your glass.  That knocks out some carbonation and gives you a big creamy head.  You might try something like that.
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Offline sheets

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Re: thick creamy head
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2010, 05:57:27 PM »
One of the things that gives the smooth mouthfeel is actually a low carbonation level.  The nitrogen helps that by making sure the beer pours with so much force that it knocks some of the carbonation out of it.  Same thing with the nitro pour for Guinness.  Years ago, Guinness came with a syringe so you could suck up some beer and shoot it back into your glass.  That knocks out some carbonation and gives you a big creamy head.  You might try something like that.
[/quote]

wow, i never would have guessed that. i always thought guinness just skipped carbonating altogether and just nitrogenated the stout to create smaller fine bubbles or something along those lines. always very informative sir thank you much for your input.

Slainte!