Author Topic: Lager fermentation  (Read 1513 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Lager fermentation
« Reply #45 on: March 19, 2014, 06:43:30 PM »
Those weren't torches they were tiki torches. "If you like pina coladas... "

Offline S. cerevisiae

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Re: Lager fermentation
« Reply #46 on: March 19, 2014, 07:34:06 PM »
Well, this is a quote from Wyeast's website technical section, yeast fundamentals page

" Ale and lager yeasts are currently both classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae"

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Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Latin translates roughly to sugar fungus (Saccharomyces) of beer (cerevisiae).  It's no coincidence that the Spanish word for beer is cerveza.

At one point, all brewing strains were classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the species also includes wine and baker's yeast).  However, the field of yeast genetics has determined that lager strains are hybrids of two different species within the Saccharomyces genus; namely, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus.  The Latin name for this hybrid is Sacchormyces pastorianus.   Furthermore, the field of yeast genetics has determined that their are two genetically different yeast families within the S. pastorianus species; namely, Frohberg and Saaz.  Here's a link to a recent paper that sheds new light on the Frohberg and Saaz families: http://www.g3journal.org/content/early/2014/02/26/g3.113.010090.full.pdf+html.  The researchers sequenced Carlsberg Bottom Yeast No. 1 (the first pure culture lager strain, which is also a Saaz strain) and W-34/70 (which is a Frohberg strain) for the study.

Offline troybinso

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Re: Lager fermentation
« Reply #47 on: March 19, 2014, 08:14:20 PM »
Well, this is a quote from Wyeast's website technical section, yeast fundamentals page

" Ale and lager yeasts are currently both classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae"

Sent from my SCH-I915 using Tapatalk

Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Latin translates roughly to sugar fungus (Saccharomyces) of beer (cerevisiae).  It's no coincidence that the Spanish word for beer is cerveza.

At one point, all brewing strains were classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the species also includes wine and baker's yeast).  However, the field of yeast genetics has determined that lager strains are hybrids of two different species within the Saccharomyces genus; namely, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus.  The Latin name for this hybrid is Sacchormyces pastorianus.   Furthermore, the field of yeast genetics has determined that their are two genetically different yeast families within the S. pastorianus species; namely, Frohberg and Saaz.  Here's a link to a recent paper that sheds new light on the Frohberg and Saaz families: http://www.g3journal.org/content/early/2014/02/26/g3.113.010090.full.pdf+html.  The researchers sequenced Carlsberg Bottom Yeast No. 1 (the first pure culture lager strain, which is also a Saaz strain) and W-34/70 (which is a Frohberg strain) for the study.

I don't know anything about that publication, and I am not an expert in yeast or genomes, but I made it past the abstract and I thought that it sounded interesting and I could probably pick out the important parts that I can understand. Then I got to the first line of the introduction...

"Starting from the early ages of agriculture and the domestication of barley fermented beverages played an important role in the emerging societies."

...and I thought: whatever happened to commas! I had to read that sentence three times before it made sense to me, and there are none of them fancy words in there neither.

I will trudge through the the science and hope that the grammar doesn't slow me down.

Offline S. cerevisiae

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Re: Lager fermentation
« Reply #48 on: March 19, 2014, 08:37:05 PM »

I don't know anything about that publication, and I am not an expert in yeast or genomes, but I made it past the abstract and I thought that it sounded interesting and I could probably pick out the important parts that I can understand. Then I got to the first line of the introduction...

"Starting from the early ages of agriculture and the domestication of barley fermented beverages played an important role in the emerging societies."

...and I thought: whatever happened to commas! I had to read that sentence three times before it made sense to me, and there are none of them fancy words in there neither.

I will trudge through the the science and hope that the grammar doesn't slow me down.

The authors are non-native English speakers.  I have had the pleasure of exchanging a couple of e-mails with Jürgen Wendland.  His native language is German.

The field of yeast genetics was pioneered at Carlsberg Laboratory in the thirties and forties by Øjvind Winge.  Øjvind was lucky in that his assistant was an American scientist named Catherine Roberts.  I have a culture in my bank that was deposited by Catherine Roberts while she was working with Øjvind in the forties.   
« Last Edit: March 19, 2014, 08:39:50 PM by S. cerevisiae »

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Lager fermentation
« Reply #49 on: March 20, 2014, 02:33:20 AM »
Ya well, I coached Vic Wild in football and raced him on MT Hood. (True Story)

Offline erockrph

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Re: Lager fermentation
« Reply #50 on: March 20, 2014, 07:25:48 AM »
Ya well, I coached Vic Wild in football and raced him on MT Hood. (True Story)

Go back to Soviet Russia, ya commie!
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline denny

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Re: Lager fermentation
« Reply #51 on: March 20, 2014, 08:26:53 AM »
Per the reply to my email to wyeast, they are separate species and web page is wrong.

Which is what I said...damn, every once in a while I get one!  :)
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